Jump to content




Search Articles


Observing Skills Archives

Observing Abell 2151: The Hercules Cluster

Jul 01 2009 10:38 AM | admin in Observing Skills

The area in Hercules bordering Serpens Caput has always interested me due the remoteness of many of the visible galaxies in that area, many of which are members of the Hercules Supercluster over 500 million light years away.

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Jewels In Dark Settings, Two By Two

May 14 2009 07:46 AM | admin in Observing Skills

Spring is not a season that presents a lot of deep sky objects to the irregular chunk of sky I can see from my tree crowded back yard

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Three Evenings in December

Feb 19 2009 05:48 AM | admin in Observing Skills

On the 28th of December, 2008, I found myself checking the Clear Sky Chart and seeing nothing but deep blue squares for the next three days

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Meteorites

Jan 21 2009 01:44 AM | admin in Observing Skills

It was by chance that I acquired my first meteorite

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    *****

Astronomy for the Disabled

Dec 19 2008 05:03 AM | iancandler in Observing Skills

My name is Ian candler. I am 50 yrs old and for the last 9 + yrs have been disabled due to a bad back injury

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

My Lunar Eclipse Experience

Mar 17 2008 02:25 AM | Chris Schroeder in Observing Skills

aboard the Caribbean Princess on February

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Beautiful Saturn

Feb 21 2008 02:07 AM | admin in Observing Skills

Saturn, the jewel of our solar system, is best known for it’s spectacular rings and multitude of moons

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Observation Log on the Web

Nov 30 2007 02:14 AM | Oldfield So in Observing Skills

It's always nice to keep a log on your observations.

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Loons on the Lake (Binocular Observing Report)

Jul 23 2007 02:09 AM | admin in Observing Skills

The record of my binocular observing over recent vacation

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Beyond M42

Dec 21 2006 03:59 AM | ftodonoghue in Observing Skills

As we spend so much time studying Orion over the Winter, it will do no harm at all to mention a few of the other objects that are visible apart from M42, the Great Orion Nebula

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Inside a Messier Marathon

May 05 2006 02:57 AM | Art Fritzson in Observing Skills

I decided to try my hand at a Messier Marathon this year - I'd never done one before and I've only been observing for a couple of years. If you haven't tried one, or if you have and want to compare it with your own

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Southern Globular Clusters for Binoculars

Apr 18 2006 01:49 AM | Magellanico in Observing Skills

The list below are my compilation of 16 years of observation under Brazilian dark skies

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Lunar Domes

Feb 24 2006 04:21 AM | admin in Observing Skills

The Lunar domes and their Characteristics

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Are Amateur Observations of Mars Important?

Nov 20 2005 02:28 AM | Lusty in Observing Skills

During the 1960's and 1970's heyday of space missions to Mars we learned that amateur observations were of vital importance to the safety of landing machines on that planet

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Seeing and Transparency

Nov 19 2005 02:47 AM | Starman1 in Observing Skills

The atmosphere interferes with the telescope's ability to see. Every beginner learns that axiom very quickly. First, we blame the scope

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Deep Sky Tools: 5800 Free Mini-maps

Nov 06 2005 06:51 AM | admin in Observing Skills

Everybody knows that for catching faint deep sky objects, one has to know exactly where to look at. We need a detailed star atlas to succeed, showing very faint stars. Imagine for a moment an atlas reaching the 12.5 magnitude. It would plot millions of stars and would include thousands of charts filling several volumes. Too bulky to carry with us, isn't it? However, what we really need to know in detail is only the neighbourhood of the deep sky object we are looking for. Why charting then with high detail "empty" areas which we are not really interested in? Think in how we do starhopping. First we use our finder, and with the only assistance of our favourite sky atlas (Herald-Bobroff, Sky Atlas 2000) we gradually move to the area. Then we look through the telescope to enlarge the area, look back again to our atlas, and... ops... our atlas does not plot anything of what we can see in the eyepiece field.

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

November Skies (2005)

Nov 01 2005 02:53 AM | admin in Observing Skills

Highlights: Comet Journal, Martian Landers, Planet Plotting, Leonid Meteor Shower, Where Are We Now?, November Moon

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Solar Binoviewing

Oct 27 2005 05:45 AM | admin in Observing Skills

Here are my impressions after nine months of extensive solar viewing and a couple of nocturnal sessions

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Free Mag 7 Star Charts

Apr 24 2005 09:30 AM | admin in Observing Skills

I hope beginner's and experienced observers alike might find some use in these charts -- as a first atlas, as a bridge atlas between planishere and a deeper atlas, as a binocular atlas, as printable charts for outlining observing plans and/or recording small field notes, or to make wallpaper for your outhouse. At the very least, when you take family or friends on an observing outing it is easy (and affordable) to ensure everyone has an atlas of their own to refer to.

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Lunar MISSION: POSSIBLE

Mar 30 2005 06:45 PM | admin in Observing Skills

Introduction...

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

A Dream Night in the Observatory (The Moon)

Feb 16 2006 07:16 AM | JimP in Observing Skills

I always enjoy getting to the observatory ahead of time. I like observing in the evening to early morning and, I like getting up early to observe as long as I have some significant observing time before dawn

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Spring Double Star Tour

Feb 16 2006 06:47 AM | admin in Observing Skills

In the north woods, Spring comes much later than in most places, but it generally starts near the end of April. By then the only remaining evidence of winter are patches of snow left in the woods beneath the shade of thick evergreens. The smelt are beginning their yearly trek up stream, and it won't belong

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Flocking Materials Test -stray light reduction

Mar 12 2005 11:47 AM | admin in Observing Skills

Stray light reflected off inner tube walls in Newtonian & Dobsonian telescopes has been a subject of increasing concern in recent years by Amateur Astronomers. Small portions of this light finds its way to the image plane, where it can significantly diminish resolution and contrast. The degree of image deterioration is directly determined by the degree of reflectance at the inner tube surface. Therefore, in order to achieve the best possible performance, it is critically important to have this reflectance reduced to a possible minimium, particularly in unbaffled tubes. Current methods to reduce this stray light have been to flock the inside walls either

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

Basics of Starhopping

Jul 29 2005 12:35 PM | Wouter D'hoye in Observing Skills

Today we, amateur astronomers, have an immense array of equipment at our disposal. We have telescopes that can find their own way through the sky and even tell us what we are looking at. Some telescopes are even capable

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----

What Does It Take To See Width In The Cassini D...

Jul 29 2005 11:59 AM | admin in Observing Skills

The Airy disk radius is measured from the midpoint of the central diffraction disk to the minimum of the first diffraction interspace. The central diffraction disk, sometimes confusingly referred to as the Airy disk, is somewhat smaller than the true Airy disk.

attachments:
Read story →    0 comments    -----




Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics