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Fixing the Giro Mount

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#1 asaint

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Posted 19 September 2003 - 06:15 AM

Fixing the Giro Mount Article

#2 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 19 September 2003 - 05:47 PM

I have been looking at buying a Giro-2 mount. How is the stability at high power? I will be attaching a 4in f/9 refractor to it.

#3 Oldfield

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Posted 21 September 2003 - 09:47 PM

It's very stable at high power, with my C8... 300x is easy.

#4 rboe

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Posted 21 September 2003 - 09:53 PM

Oldfield; I'm glad you didn't post pictures of you and your dad trying to pull that brute apart. It would have been too much! Sounds like you needed the services of a press. They have these big units for pulling parts apart - and their counterpart the press for squeezing them back together. I'm not too sure how you would have put it back together if you had succeeded in getting it apart. It will be interesting how long this fix will last.

#5 Oldfield

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Posted 22 September 2003 - 04:58 AM

No, we just pull it hard enough to make a slide large enough for me to pull some grease back, pushing it back together is not hard at all... since it's the suction which prevents it from separating.

Service of a press? I don't quite understand... Poor English I have. oops...

#6 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 22 September 2003 - 01:25 PM

I do not own a GiroMount, beet it seems like a rock solid thing....

A hint for seperating the base next time; try heating up the mount body gently with a hairdryer or paint stripper (caution with this one!) 50 or 60 degrees should be no problem for the paint but to hot to handle bare handed.
The grease will be smoother then, also the metal will expand outwards so there will be more space. In this manner your arm will not stretch by 5cm everytime you try to pull this thing apart!

Peppe

#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 22 September 2003 - 05:30 PM

Oldfield; What do you use for a base? Tripod? I am looking to put the Giro on a pier with my 4in refractor.

#8 Oldfield

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Posted 22 September 2003 - 11:58 PM

Yes, I use a tripod.

#9 Mad Matt

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Posted 24 September 2003 - 03:21 AM

Great Artical Oldfield. I'm glad you got your mount working again.

Of course Tele-Optic does not recommend you dissassemble the mount. We also realise that sending it off for repairs is simply not a good alternative. Especialy with Mars waiting to be Photographed. My comments come under the catagory - "Do at your own risk". :grin:

At the point you where, the only thing keeping the two pieces from comming apart is a small plastic plug that protects the Az. friction screw from gouging the Az. Axis. It runs in a noot to keep the Giro from comming apart unintentionaly. I'm glad to see it is working properly :D

With a bit more force you end up shaving off about 0.5mm of the plastic plug when the bottom comes off. In most cases this does not harm the fuction of the plug and it can simply be reused. If it is damaged to much your dealer or Tele-Optic can of course send a new one.

Please do NOT use a heat gun or anything simular. Just think what happends when that plasic plug melts and turns into glue :(

I hope that helps,

Matthew Friend
Tele-Optic Technical consultant

#10 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 24 September 2003 - 12:03 PM

Thanks for correcting my ill advice :)
Wouldn't want anyone around here to ruin his/her's giro!
I'll remember it when i own one myself.

Peppe

#11 Mad Matt

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Posted 25 September 2003 - 09:53 AM

No problem Peppe. If the plastic was not there your advice would make good sence.

-Matt

#12 Oldfield

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Posted 29 September 2003 - 10:08 PM

Matthew, thanks again!

Now, I'm thinking if I should go for a full disassembly, since the Mars is getting farther... I need something to pull it off, instead of getting my (old) father involved, my wife simply can't help a bit... :lol:

#13 rboe

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Posted 30 September 2003 - 08:55 AM

Oldfield;

I'm wondering if you couldn't bolt two strong pieces of wood to each end using existing bolt holes then use two car sissor jacks to push the pieces of wood apart? Metal would be stronger but a bit tougher to work depending on available tools.

Just about any jack would do that would fit between the wood beams but everybody has one in their car. If you don't own a car I would think you could borrow two for the half hour it would take to 'break' apart. Then you get your wife to operate one and involve her! Just in case you break something - you have someone to blame! :lol: And me, but I'm thousands of miles away.






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