Jump to content


Photo

New Helios 10.5 X 70mm binocular.

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 steveoid

steveoid

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 692
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2008
  • Loc: London, England

Posted 06 July 2008 - 05:00 AM

I decided that I needed a new pair of 10x binoculars but because we have such a huge amount of choice here in England it was not going to be an easy task. I looked at all the big names Nikon, Canon, Zeiss etc but did not really like any of their offerings. Having already bought a 100mm binocular with U-mount from the Far East and was very happy with the result I decided to go with a company called Helios. The binoculars are made in Japan and come in a nice protected case, which on closer inspection does seem a bit flimsy especially the mount for the handle.. The magnification is X10.5 with a 70mm object glass and they are also fully coated through out. The body is also rubber armoured with a light green finish and they are also nitrogen filled to prevent misting, the weight of the binocular is 2.6kg. Because I need to wear glasses the eye relief is most important to me and this binocular has a very generous 23mm. The prisms are Barium crown BAK 4 and are superb with no obstructions in the field of view. The focussing is by individual eyepiece mechanisms so this type of binocular would not suite birding for instance, they also have threaded eyepiece units to accept standard 1.25” astronomical filters. The workmanship on these binoculars is also superb and the engineering is very solid and feels like a good binocular should.
The image is very clear and bright with an exit pupil of 6.6mm and with a 5.5 degree true field of view. The image is sharp all the way to the edge with no false colour on the moon or stars which show a point like structure, a good way to tell if you are going to be plagued with false colour is to look at some tree branches against a very bright background, there should be no false colour against the image of the branches. These binoculars cannot be hand held and therefore a tripod would be needed to use as a scientific tool. I am now in the process of sorting out my old DeVere tripod for use with these binoculars. They come in two varieties the 10.5x and a 15x but I decided on the lower power for sweeping views and also my other binoculars are high powered.These binoculars cost just under £300 here in England and while this might sound like an awful lot of money they should give decades of use if looked after, so in reality they are a good buy and well worth the money.

Attached Files



#2 KennyJ

KennyJ

    The British Flash

  • *****
  • Posts: 34239
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2003
  • Loc: Lancashire UK

Posted 06 July 2008 - 05:05 AM

Thanks for an encouraging report Steve .

Don't forget to add the 10.5 x 70 to your signature list !

Kenny

#3 charen

charen

    Surveyor 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 1643
  • Joined: 28 May 2005
  • Loc: New Zealand

Posted 06 July 2008 - 05:55 AM

Hi nice report. These are Hi quality binoculars. I have the Orion Resolux 15x70 versions. These are actually Chinese sourced Binoculars from the United Optics / Kunming Factory.
Helios does source from different companies for their different models.
Helios labels there Kunming series BA8 version 10.5x70, 15x85 and 28x110 as ‘Apollos'.
The Apollo’s are the same as the Orion 'Resolux' 10.5x70 and 15x70's. They are also sold by Garrett as ‘Signatures, ‘Oberwerk as ‘Ultras’ and Astro Physics as their ‘Premiums’.
The 'Quantum' series 6 and 7 are also from the Chinese Kunming / United factory.
The 15x70 Helios 'Stellar' series binos are sourced from Japan. They are optically good but they have minimal eye relief. Orion also sold them as the 15x70 'Little Giant' 11.
The Quantum 10x60's is the Kunming / United series 3 versions.

Yes it gets confusing.

http://www.united-op..._Binoculars.htm

http://www.widescree..._Observati.html

http://www.widescree...ESOLUTION_.html

#4 steveoid

steveoid

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 692
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2008
  • Loc: London, England

Posted 06 July 2008 - 06:16 AM

Cheers Kenny nice to hear from a real expert, I really do like these bins they really astounded me when I took my first views with them. Charon thanks for the update, I did think these were from the Chinese factory then some guy told me they are Japanese so like you said totally confusing. I own two Chinese refractors and a mount ( same as you) and they are superb instruments for the price.

#5 Michael S.

Michael S.

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 31 May 2008
  • Loc: New Zealand

Posted 07 July 2008 - 07:47 AM

Great to read these reviews. About a year ago I purchased a pair of Signature 10.5x70 from Garrett Optical. GO shipped them to me in New Zealand and they arrived in perfect condition. These binoculars are indeed superb, and I agree with what is written in the review and comments. Steve good that you recommend a tripod for these, I think that's a must too. In fact I'm preparing to construct a parallellogram mount for the 10.5x70 (and future bino's!).

I'd like to add to this the rugged quality of the individual focus on the eyepieces, and the fact that they take 1.25" filters. The long eye relief is useful when adding a filter, I wear glasses and the eye relief is still fine.

----------------------
GO Signature 10.5x70
Nikon Monarch ATB 8x42

#6 steveoid

steveoid

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 692
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2008
  • Loc: London, England

Posted 07 July 2008 - 01:24 PM

Hello Michael, The binoculars are definitely made for a tripod although you could hand hold for a few minutes the view is not very good. Once mounted, then you see what these binoculars can really do. The parallelogram sounds like a good idea I have also toyed with the idea for these glasses and this is something which I will probably address later on this year. I think the Chinese are certainly pulling the stops out on their optical production with some very good instruments being sold for very good prices. I did consider the 15x70mm but that would have been too close to the magnification that I already have with my 100mm bins. Charon was right about the Kunming factory in china they do all the Quantum and Helios binoculars and for the price they can’t be beaten.

#7 mercedes_sl1970

mercedes_sl1970

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 559
  • Joined: 02 Dec 2005
  • Loc: Canberra, Oz

Posted 08 July 2008 - 07:01 AM

I have had a set of these 10.5x70s for a while now (locally Australian badged versions) and agree with most of the comments - great sharpness across (most) of the field, good contrast and colour rendition, etc. I have to say that they are excellent value - and very sturdy and well made.

Interestingly, I find the greater weight of these binos makes for a steadier view compared to lighter 10x's and even compared to a rather light Kern 7x50 Focalpin. (I believe there is a physiological explanation for this which I very, very vaguely remember from university days many moons ago - but of course forget the exact mechanism...)

Enjoy!

Andrew

#8 Wes James

Wes James

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5504
  • Joined: 12 Apr 2006

Posted 08 July 2008 - 08:05 AM

Takes more energy to get a heavier mass moving... so doesn't jitter around as easy. Of course, once it starts moving, takes more energy to get it to stop! End result- less jitters, motion is slower. The mass smooths out the little movements.
Wes

#9 EdZ

EdZ

    Professor EdZ

  • *****
  • Posts: 18820
  • Joined: 15 Feb 2002
  • Loc: Cumberland, R I , USA42N71.4W

Posted 08 July 2008 - 08:06 AM

Interestingly, I find the greater weight of these binos makes for a steadier view compared to lighter 10x's and even compared to a rather light Kern 7x50 Focalpin. (I believe there is a physiological explanation for this which I very, very vaguely remember from university days many moons ago - but of course forget the exact mechanism...)


Mass leads to dampening of movement, therefore handheld oscillations are tempered. However mass also leads to tiring more quickly.

edz

#10 steveoid

steveoid

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 692
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2008
  • Loc: London, England

Posted 08 July 2008 - 08:24 AM

The bottom line is these binoculars weigh in at 2.5kg (5lbs) and holding them steady even for a short while is almost impossible and viewing stars is a definite no. The reality is you need a tripod to get the best out of them especially for astronomical use.

#11 Gordon Rayner

Gordon Rayner

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2463
  • Joined: 24 Mar 2007

Posted 09 July 2008 - 07:41 PM

Has anyone , inadvertently or otherwise, removed some/all of the heavy rubber covering? I have seen a lot of Fuji 7 x 50MTR /Fmtr and the Kamakura Koki /Fujinon with the prism tilt collimation over a long period , and the rubber covering is often so deteriorated from salt water, sunlight, and/or perspiration, that removal of the remainder, with the help of toluene (YUK, attacks most rubber gloves) was the only sanitary option. Sometimes the rubber would be replaced, sometimes not. The rubberless binocs are noticeable lighter.
The rubber covering ads considerable weight. Presumably astronomers and most other non-nautical users do not have wet hands. To me, the main benefit of rubber, for the careless boater, would be to minimize sliding on a chart table as a boat rolls or pitches. I prefer the non-rubber covered versions of the Fuji Meibo/Fujinon 10 x 70 and 7 x 50 . The rubber covering has almost no benefit for shock cushioning. Far more important is the shock resistance( the lack of it) of the glue used in Asia in recent times to secure the prisms.






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics