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The Amazing World of Fusion Crust

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#1 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:26 AM

Hi All,

Fusion crust has taken on a renewed importance in the authentication of specimens. But beyond its utilitarian use, it is really a sheen of solidified lava that reflects both the turmoil of the meteorite’s arrival on earth, but also expresses the individual chemical makeup of the space rock when melted.

From foamy jet-black, to tar-like shiny plastic, to milky brown paint, fusion crust is a characteristic of meteorites whose value only appreciates, and beauty only grows as one delves deeper into meteorite collecting. Here are a dozen examples of crust from my collection. Each is a testament to the extraordinary and individual nature of these beasts.

Enjoy.

Bialystok, Poland
Howardite
Fell: October 5, 1827

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#2 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:27 AM

Pavel, Bulgaria
H5 Chondrite
Fell: February 28, 1966

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#3 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:28 AM

Pasamonte, New Mexico, USA
Eucrite
Fell: March 24, 1933

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#4 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:28 AM

Selakopi, Indonesia
H5 Chondrite
Fell: September 26, 1939

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#5 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:29 AM

Binda, Australia
Howardite
Fell: May 25, 1912

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#6 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:29 AM

Alfianello, Italy
L6 Chondrite
Fell: February 16, 1883

This monster slice is well over a kilogram. Note the little centimeter cube peeking out in the lower left.

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#7 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:30 AM

Ibbenbüren, Germany
Diogenite
Fell: June 17, 1870

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#8 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:30 AM

Murchison, Australia
CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrite
Fell: September 28, 1969

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#9 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:31 AM

Goalpara, India
Ureilite
Discovered in 1868 among the mineral and gem specimens provided to the Calcutta Museum by the Rajah of Goalpara.

It is presumed that the Goalpara meteorite was witnessed to fall which is how it wound up in a gem collection. It is not assumed that the Rajah of Goalpara knew that this class of meteorite called Ureilite actually contains diamonds, which it does.

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#10 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:31 AM

Zabrodje, Belarus
L6 Chondrite
Fell: September 22, 1893
This meteorite fell as a single stone right through the roof of a house.

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#11 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:33 AM

Haraiya, India
Eucrite, Monomict
Fell: August 1878

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#12 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:33 AM

Cumberland Falls, Kentucky, USA
Aubrite
Fell: April 9, 1919

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#13 csa/montana

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 11:02 AM

These specimens are absolutely beautiful! :bow: :bow: :bow:

Thanks for sharing such beautiful photos of them!

#14 Talstarone

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 02:36 PM

Awesome Images,Martin. Those are some of the best looking specimens I have ever seen.

It is interesting comparing the differences in the fusion crust from each individual type of Meteorite. Though I would be more the happy to give any of the pictured specimens a place to call home.

But the sheer pressure,heat,and speed that each meteorite is subjected to during its descent is incredible.Its amazing with them experiencing these processes, that any would or could survive.

#15 edwincjones

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 02:59 PM

wow!

#16 Ed Fortier

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 03:35 PM

wow, indeed.

#17 Dick Lipke

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 04:59 PM

Not to seem to repetitive,but WOW!

#18 Talstarone

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 07:44 PM

While going through a few pieces to place for sale at my store, I ran across this little piece with some of its Fusion Crust still in place.
This is a Specimen of NWA 869:

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#19 Talstarone

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 07:45 PM

Post deleted by Talstarone

#20 Talstarone

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 07:46 PM

Post deleted by Talstarone

#21 Talstarone

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 07:51 PM

Last...This Really Was a Pleasant Surprize. I have specimens with fusion crusts I am aware of. Its always a joy to look at a small piece that had not been examined in quite a while, and then find this:

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#22 zagami

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 08:17 PM

Hi,

Thanks for sharing the pic.

Are you sure it is 869? Unless my memory is going, or the pic was photoshopped, black crust is not an 869 trait. I remember 869 having a weathered brownish varnish with no real aspect one would describe as fresh.

Does the internal nature of your pictured piece match other 869 in your inventory? Maybe a polish is in order on the internal side of this specimen.

That crust looks somewhat calcium-rich eucrite-ish if you ask me. What does it do around a magnet?

#23 Talstarone

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 09:42 PM

Hi,

Thanks for sharing the pic.

Are you sure it is 869? Unless my memory is going, or the pic was photoshopped, black crust is not an 869 trait. I remember 869 having a weathered brownish varnish with no real aspect one would describe as fresh.

Does the internal nature of your pictured piece match other 869 in your inventory? Maybe a polish is in order on the internal side of this specimen.

That crust looks somewhat calcium-rich eucrite-ish if you ask me. What does it do around a magnet?


Martin, I am not 100% sure how to take your last post.I am very baffled about the Photoshop reference.

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#24 zagami

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 10:09 AM

All I mean is that sometimes when photos are prepared for display on the internet, the contrast is cleaned up, maybe the image is brightened. Things like that can cause the crust to appear a richer, fresher black than if compared in person.

Of course the opposite can happen as well. If you look at my pic of Pavel above, I can assure you the crust is not green, and actually appears black rather than with dusty dark yellowish overtones.

I noticed when comparing your two posted images, the background is bluish in one, and fairly white in the other. The red cube is red in one, and pinkish in the other. Also, the black portion of the upper image is likely a pretty good black to trust, and it matches well with the specimen's crust. There is not much of a black strip in the lower pic so it is hard to compare blacks. Those "known" colors help me guess at the true color of the crust.

In the pic above where two specimens are side by side, it still looks like the fragment has blacker, more textured (possibly fresher?) crust.

Have you compared similar sized pieces (like the two above) with a magnet?

#25 Talstarone

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 01:33 PM

I am still somewhat confused as to where this is leading. When re-sizing the pics I do press a button that says Auto-Contrast. It brightens the image very,very slightly.

I touch NO OTHER brightness,contrast,temperature or any other controls that will change appearance. From what I read you seemed to think that the image is either not a specimen of NWA 869 or that I have changed the color.

I will send you a PM to see if I can understand what you are trying to say,because now I just dont get it.Sorry






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