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#1 hapo

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 06:13 PM

I just stumbled on the Astrosysteme site searching for astrographs offers and it seems that they are making a mount http://www.astrosyst.../eng/monts.html , observatory class, advertised as having no PE. Can anyone comment on the specifications and if it is really possible to have no PEC at all? The mount looks good in picture anyway.

#2 watcher

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 06:57 PM

When I win the lottery, I'll get a few of them! 140 lbs. capacity, and super accurate. What's not to like. You can pre-order one at OPT for about 18000.

#3 Mike Clemens

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 07:02 PM

just AWESOME!! I am thinking the Mr. FUSION as seen in Back To The Future will be the appropriate field power pack for this mount.

#4 Jared

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 11:59 PM

I just stumbled on the Astrosysteme site searching for astrographs offers and it seems that they are making a mount http://www.astrosyst.../eng/monts.html , observatory class, advertised as having no PE. Can anyone comment on the specifications and if it is really possible to have no PEC at all? The mount looks good in picture anyway.


I have no experience with the mount, but it absolutely should be possible to avoid periodic error entirely. Rather than trying to improve periodic error mechanically, ASA has decided to use high resolution encoders to track and correct periodic error as it occurs. It's almost like an SBIG adaptive optic system, except that it works by measuring variations in position on the mount itself rather than using a guide star.

The only problem I can see is that you would want very nearly perfect polar alignment to get the most out of this mount. With extremely accurate polar alignment, you could eliminate the need for autoguiding entirely.

#5 Mike Clemens

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 12:53 AM

The last mount of this type we were chatting about peaked at almost a kilowatt at times didn't it? Do these have fantastic holding currents or not?

#6 TxStars

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 10:47 AM

Well I will go out on a limb here and say IMHO
Guiding or Adaptive optics are allways needed at focal lengths greater than 100mm due to atmospheric refraction.
It has nothing to do with how good the mount tracks.
Once you go beyond local seeing good tracking means nothing.

#7 Miguel Lopes

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 11:21 AM

Well I will go out on a limb here and say IMHO
Guiding or Adaptive optics are allways needed at focal lengths greater than 100mm due to atmospheric refraction.
It has nothing to do with how good the mount tracks.
Once you go beyond local seeing good tracking means nothing.

Same opinion. Was that 1000mm typo?
I think that in the near future most mounts can discard great PE and concentrate on go-to accuracy, as people will go for AO.
Easier to move a 40g glass than a +50Kg mount... :tonofbricks:

#8 chboss

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 12:29 PM

I have seen the mount live in Germany... very impressive. Certainly an alternative for people looking to buy a mount for a permanent observatory. I heard that they are working on a smaller "portable" version for mid next year. It needs to be seen how big the power consumption will be. I would also guess it is to high for real portable use.

The one thing that I don't like is that you need to run a Windows PC to controll the mount. As I understood there is no stand alone hand controller... :smirk:

I will wait in any case until first specimens arrive in the wild. ;)

CS
Chris

#9 Egon Doeberl

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 04:09 PM

Hi Jared,

[EDIT: Removed unsolicited product marketing CH]

CS

Egon

#10 Egon Doeberl

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 04:15 PM

Hi Chris,

[EDIT: Removed unsolicited product marketing CH]

CS

Egon

#11 cvedeler

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 06:26 PM

I'm curious if anyone has used this mount yet in the US? I really like the sound of it.

#12 GShaffer

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 09:46 PM

The smaller one depicted here is VERY intresting for the price 5750 Euro.....

http://www.astrosyst...ount_ddm60.html



When I win the lottery, I'll get a few of them! 140 lbs. capacity, and super accurate. What's not to like. You can pre-order one at OPT for about 18000.



#13 WOBentley

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 09:23 PM

The ASA DDM60 is very interesting. Since I live in a fair amount of light pollution the portability of it combined with the essential elimination of PEC should make for a great remote unit. I am really interested to hear any actual use comments from any US users...

#14 LLEEGE

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 08:17 AM

When I win the lottery, I'll get a few of them! 140 lbs. capacity, and super accurate. What's not to like. You can pre-order one at OPT for about 18000.

For that price, you can get a decked out AP1200 and a nice scope to put on it. 99.44% of us don't need any more accuracy then the AP's deliver at 1/2 the cost.

#15 Dennis Sakva

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 11:53 AM

ASA mounts have their specific use. At 100 degrees per second gotos they can be used to observe fast decaying events like gamma bursts that last few seconds.

#16 cvedeler

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 01:19 PM

99.44% of us don't need any more accuracy then the AP's deliver at 1/2 the cost.


Actually it is 94.99% :grin:

I'm intrigued by the idea that one could do away with guiding. Theoretically it would be possible if one could model out the atmospheric refraction. They claim to be able to go with sub arc second unguided tracking for more than an hour. This would greatly simplify imaging. Also with this tracking and pointing accuracy, plate solves become a thing of the past as well. This mount also compensates for mount vibration from wind etc. at 100x/sec without needing a star for adaptive optics. That can be a big deal.

This of course is assuming it can be done in the field. That I would like to see (or hear about by a 3rd party) before I would open up my wallet. :question:

#17 Mert

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 01:24 PM

But we will still have to deal with the fast
atmosferic turbulence effects, which as others
already have stated can be dealt with an AO
system.
To bad these mounts will be incredibly expensive!

#18 LLEEGE

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 01:24 PM

[ Theoretically it would be possible if one could model out the atmospheric refraction.

Pulse Guide. :grin:

#19 Phil Cowell

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 05:46 PM

But we will still have to deal with the fast
atmosferic turbulence effects, which as others
already have stated can be dealt with an AO
system.
To bad these mounts will be incredibly expensive!


It's early days for the ASA yet. Give them time to build up volume and kill off some of the older clunkers out there and pick up their market share. Hopefully then the price will drop, it's always expensive being an early adopter.

#20 fetoma

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 06:04 PM

I wish one of the other manufacturers would buy one of these to clone. Then you would see prices start to fall I think.

#21 rjsc2000

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 04:15 AM

judging from their high tech cnc machines, i don't think the price will drop....

Maybe some DIY experts can clone it....

#22 dan17

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 11:10 AM

Chinese will clone everything, when we will be able to have it

#23 coz

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 02:44 PM

I'm pretty set to get a AP Mach1 at the next production cycle but I just saw a S&T video with the ASA DDM60. The ASA is more money but is in the same ballpark as the AP. Is this new technology worth it? I'm new to astrophotography and don't have a lot of equipment. I feel like if I had the ASA I wouldn't need to get a guidescope. I think I might miss the AP handset though. Any opinions?

#24 DeanS

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 08:23 PM

tried and true technolgy is priceless out in the field at night :) Unless you are able to set this up on a permanant pier I would think you still need a guide scope?

#25 BPO

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 10:58 PM

The ASA DDM60 is very interesting. Since I live in a fair amount of light pollution the portability of it combined with the essential elimination of PEC should make for a great remote unit. I am really interested to hear any actual use comments from any US users...


Chris Lyons in Baltimore, USA has had a DDM-85 for some time, although he hasn't had much chance to use it.

However, having said that, from the relatively small amount of use he's got so far, it certainly sounds like an amazing piece of equipment.

Over on the Yahoo! tech group for ASA mounts, you'll find a few other Americans with DDMs, mostly the 60 but at least one other DDM-85 owner, as well as many European owners.






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