Jump to content


Photo

Lunar Halo Feb 2 ~ 3 2009

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 markseibold

markseibold

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1573
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Portland Oregon

Posted 05 February 2009 - 07:19 PM

Posted Image
Well, I never thought I'd attempt a lunar halo. This is a rather impressionistic rendering as I do not think I really captured the real feel of it. Maybe a little. I know there are web sites such as Les Cowley's Atmospheric Optics and possibly other technical sites that explain the many varying halos and their distance in degrees from the moon, weather conditions, etc. They do really indicate that a weather change is imminent. We had 50 degrees F yesterday and they predict snow by the weekend again.

For two nights the high thin cirro-stratus layer of clouds [edited Feb 7th as I mistakenly reported clouds here; the very minimal clouds appeared on the second night but the sky remained clear around the moon which still showed the this rare halo- *See my later comments below on Feb 7th] ...

produced one of those very small halos around the moon. A tight wrapped cream color that faded to a slight orange diffuse ring, then a very faint and abrupt blue outer periphery ring that faded to black sky.

I think I was as carried away with the local street ambience and had to just throw it in with Venus near the horizon and fading daylight at the time of observing. :cool:

Various pastel chalks on 19" X 25" Black Strathmore 500 Series paper.

Mark

#2 Erix

Erix

    Toad Lily

  • *****
  • Administrators
  • Posts: 25766
  • Joined: 25 Dec 2004
  • Loc: Texas, USA

Posted 05 February 2009 - 10:05 PM

Very artistic.

Evidently what I generally see is what is called a lunar aureole. It's got a corn color around the moon and much smaller than a halo. I've only seen a halo a few times these past couple of years, but the aureoles are very frequent if a person looks up often enough to see them.

Here is a collage of photos that I took one night of the aureoles. I've never tried sketching them but it's been in the back of my mind to do so sometime.

Attached Files



#3 Erix

Erix

    Toad Lily

  • *****
  • Administrators
  • Posts: 25766
  • Joined: 25 Dec 2004
  • Loc: Texas, USA

Posted 05 February 2009 - 10:06 PM

Here's just one more, if you don't mind. The aureoles are a little more formed in this collage. I suppose what always put me off of sketching them was how quickly the clouds move.

Attached Files



#4 Tommy5

Tommy5

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2814
  • Joined: 28 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Chicagoland

Posted 05 February 2009 - 10:24 PM

great set of sketches they closely resemble the actual view better than many photos of the same thing bravo.

#5 Erix

Erix

    Toad Lily

  • *****
  • Administrators
  • Posts: 25766
  • Joined: 25 Dec 2004
  • Loc: Texas, USA

Posted 05 February 2009 - 10:43 PM

Tommy, I hope you're talking about Mark's sketch and not my posts. Mine are photos that I took to show what an aureole looks like compared to halos. :lol: I've never attempted to sketch them.

#6 Tommy5

Tommy5

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2814
  • Joined: 28 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Chicagoland

Posted 05 February 2009 - 11:28 PM

Oops!, i just looked at them quickly and thought they were digital sketches,sorry about that Erix. :foreheadslap:

#7 frank5817

frank5817

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8390
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 05 February 2009 - 11:53 PM

Mark,

Excellent sketch. Based on the way you have sketched it I would say the glow around the moon is a lunar corona or as Erika calls it a lunar aureole. Note in Erika's excellent photos they are bright bluish-white near the moon and extend out just a few degrees and are red on the outside circumference. A lunar halo is typically 22 degrees and has red on the inside circumference and blue on the outside with much white light scatter beyond the blue and darker on the inside curve within the red layer. However you can have both a corona and a halo together at the same time which more closely matches your drawing. The lunar and earthly features of this drawing are spectacular and the inclusion of the atmospherics makes for great conversation and discussion. If you were wearing polarizing sunglasses you would not see a halo around the moon, just like you can't see a rainbow in the daytime while wearing the same at the ideal location. Try it, next time you see a rainbow put on polarizing sunglasses and it will disappear.
Mark, sorry I am digressing. That is a great composition. :bow: :rainbow: :cool:

Frank :)

#8 markseibold

markseibold

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1573
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Portland Oregon

Posted 06 February 2009 - 01:54 AM

Thanks to all of you. It's good to see that there are members here that have much knowledge beyond simple observational astronomy. I have forgotten much of my reading about halos. If I failed to mention the two dates, I had observed the same halo effect over two successive nights.

Erika:
Thanks for posting your collage of photos. I have forgotten that I saw those last summer and I too thought at first that you had done some amazing artwork as Tommy thought. I see your photos show a larger aureole than I observed. Your camera picked up the definite orange but I don't see the outer blue edge there as Frank explains. I imagine you'd have to overexpose to pick up the blue in a photograph.
Isn't it amazing that the eye can instantly adjust to see these subtelties but the camera cannot?

I took a photo of the Harvest Moon in 2007 with a strange rainbow-like halo in a cloud hovering above the moon and Spacweather published it. It is very similar to this street scene pastel. I cannot remember the date now and my old photo files are packed away in my stored computer since I lost the house. I'll figure the date, retrieve that photo from Spaceweather archives and post it later. -Mark

#9 markseibold

markseibold

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1573
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Portland Oregon

Posted 07 February 2009 - 02:51 PM

Here's just one more, if you don't mind. The aureoles are a little more formed in this collage. I suppose what always put me off of sketching them was how quickly the clouds move.


Erika

The photos are great. :bow: :bow: :bow: About sketching when things move or change; I think you just have to improvise and do the best impression from the mind, or memory of the past few seconds or minutes. I know that no one is going to criticize the shape of a cloud that you rendered. :lol:

That was the first time that I ever did the similar with clouds over the moon last summer (image below here again with a close-up of the terminator that I never identified the crater names on that rough small sketch- The two are on separate 9" X 12" Artagain paper). I did an impression of the general scene as the clouds were changing fast. There was not really a halo but only strange color fringes on some of the adjacent clouds. The cloud shapes are what got me to sketch it. Now that I recall, there was a general cream-beige color to the halo over broken clouds; it transcended to an outer red-orange (that perhaps I grabbed a 'too red' chalk color to render it. I suppose there was an outer blue ring just beyond the red-orange but I may have missed recording it here. >
Posted Image

Mark

#10 CarlosEH

CarlosEH

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7179
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Pembroke Pines, Broward County, Florida

Posted 07 February 2009 - 04:05 PM

Mark,

An excellent observation of a lunar aureole. You have captured this atmospheric phenomena very nicely. Your other observations are excellent as well. Thank you for sharing them with us all.

Erika- Excellent images of lunar aureoles. Thank you for sharing them.

I have attached an observation of a lunar aureole made on September 27, 2007. I hope that you like it.

Links;
http://www.atoptics....lo/circmoon.htm
http://www.pixheaven...nom=halo_lune02
http://www.dewbow.co...oes/mhalo1.html

Carlos

Attached Files



#11 frank5817

frank5817

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8390
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 08 February 2009 - 12:52 AM

Mark and Carlos,

These are great sketches you have both posted since I was last here. The prismatic colors that Mark captured in the foreground clouds and the aureole that Carlos captured in 2007 are both sensational. Although I have seen these phenomona, it has never occurred to me that they can be sketched. Someday I'll need to try for these.

Frank :)

#12 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6966
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier Co., WV 38N, 80W

Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:32 AM

Although I have seen these phenomona, it has never occurred to me that they can be sketched. Someday I'll need to try for these.

Frank :)


I've seen these phenomena too and it has occurred to me that they could be sketched--but not by me. :lol:

Impressive display of talent with these drawings. :bow:

#13 Jeff Young

Jeff Young

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4535
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2005
  • Loc: Ireland

Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:35 AM

Cool sketches and pictures, everyone!

It looks like the hardest thing is getting the fade at the outside edge, where the dark orange goes smoothly to black. I suspect that even if you captured it in the sketch, you'd have to re-do that part digitally after scanning (at least I'm pretty sure my scanner would mess it up).

Cheers,
-- Jeff.

#14 markseibold

markseibold

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1573
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Portland Oregon

Posted 08 February 2009 - 01:32 PM

Cool sketches and pictures, everyone!

It looks like the hardest thing is getting the fade at the outside edge, where the dark orange goes smoothly to black. I suspect that even if you captured it in the sketch, you'd have to re-do that part digitally after scanning (at least I'm pretty sure my scanner would mess it up).

Cheers,
-- Jeff.


Thanks again to all of you. Yes, the reality of an image of this, I think, is in the trying to duplicate it with some means of sketching. I guess this was my first real attempt. I still look at the original sketch and realize there is something else missing; perhaps more blending that I did not finish. As Jeff mentions getting the fade of the orange; I actually saw an abrupt dark blue ring on the outer edge of the faded orange and not more than a degree or two comprising the total halo. Maybe it is an anomaly of my eyes vision.

I see where Carlos renders it under a more totally cloudy sky as Erika's photos do; the [usual conditions] that create this effect where that strange outer blue ring will not show within the cloud cover obscuring it; but that is where this is so elusive. These effect of nature are so subtle at times, I think we as astronomers, more than simple observers, will dissect the scientific understanding beyond the general public out of a sheer want of that end means to understand it. Very nice digital rendering, by the way, Carlos. I think we as sketchers know that photographs do not always capture the subtleties that the human eye sees and can render in a sketch.

What makes the condition so rare and probably why I attempted this, was the rare condition of what appeared as a mostly clear sky with only a small apparent halo, no more than maybe a degree or two surrounding the moons disc. There were no apparent clouds in the sky surrounding the moon. I have rarely seen this condition. I began to think that it was not clouds at all but possibly volcano dust in the upper atmosphere. There is talk of the Alaska Redoubt volcano erupting soon but I think the news would have mentioned it. Has it been venting or spewing dust lately? Years ago Mt Pinatubo in the Philippines caused similar sky phenomena hear in the Pacific Northwest skies for many months as has the Gobi Dessert dust from China to frequent our Northwest skies. We had strange orange sunsets and sunrises and an LA-like smoggy orange sky around the sun, and other rare sky phenomena even through our crystal clean-clear winter skies then. I have heard that this is where the old phrase, “Once in a blue moon” occurs due to rare atmospheric effects from an infrequent dust from a volcano in the upper atmosphere..

I like Special Eds comment. "I've seen these phenomena too and it has ocurred to me that they could be sketched--but not by me." :lol: It is very difficult to render this especially with chalk on a textured surface. I like this Strathmore 500 Series paper but it is not as smooth as their Artagain Paper, that my older real first attempt with clouds was on (image also above.) I recommend that if you attempt a subtle halo sketch, use nothing in a paper with any texture, unless you want the old-world oil painting canvas look.

I need to look up some of the other web sites like Les Cowley's Atmospheric Optics and get my physics down about this as I am only a mere observational artist :tonofbricks: and sometimes claimed astronomer. :question:

Thanks again for the interest, information, other images and compliments from all of you,

Mark

[edited Feb 10th] I experimented with a hand held digital camera a couple nights ago from an inner city restaurant court yard, forgetting at first that the camera color settings were for daylight and then changed to tungsten. One close-up shows the typical blue to orange and possibly back to blue halo effect but this is in clouds where my original observation was without clouds. -Mark
Posted Image






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics