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Light Shaft in Grimaldi with Lohrmann & Hevelius

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#1 markseibold

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 06:50 PM

Posted Image
To all

After I saw that light shaft in the crater Grimaldi last Saturday night January 7th in early evening at Cannon Beach Oregon and rendered a rough sketch in ball point on an envelope while showing it to the public at a restaurant, I imagined standing on the surface of the moon in that light. So I rendered a scene studied from high resolution photos of the topical view. My inspiration was further helped to watch Destination Moon on the following night, the 1950's sci-fi with Chesley Bonestell paintings and movie backdrops. Further listening to NPR's Science Friday today with talk of the moon and all, added to my impetus.

I then duplicated the eyepiece view above from my earlier rough notes and memory of the live observation through the eyepiece of the Nexstar 5i with use of a 6mm Orthoscopic eyepiece at 200X.

This was the first time I used black Stonehenge paper, a sheet of 20" X 25" with various pastel chalks.

I thought of placing the crescent earth in the sky above the terrestrial scene but thought that it might be cliche'.
Perhaps someone will push me to it. I still consider this unfinished and could enhance the light shaft on the ground scene but I wore tired and need to take a break. A close-up of the eyepiece observation sketch can be seen here >
Close-up of Grimaldi -Lohrmann - Hevelius Sketch
Mark

#2 JayinUT

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 07:11 PM

Mark,

Hauntingly beautiful and truly captivating. Your sketching truly amazes me and I anticipate each of your efforts. This one needs to be submitted somewhere. I love how you capture light and shadow here.

As far as the crescent earth, I think it would offer a wonderful contrast to the black and white in the image. Then again, I'm fine with it as it is as well.

#3 perfessor

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 09:54 PM

Mark, this is very imaginative, I really like it. Leave the earth out, it would detract from the stark desolation. Thank you for showing it to us.

#4 frank5817

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 11:15 PM

Mark,

No doubt you are a wonderful artist and also very imaginative as Tom has stated above. :bow: :cool: :rainbow: How did you like using the "Stonehenge paper"?

Frank :)

#5 Tommy5

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 12:32 AM

Wow great sketch, you sketched a scene that astrophotographers won't be taking for quite some time , great imagination, bravo!

#6 markseibold

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:29 AM

Thanks Jay, Tom, Tommy and Frank

Glad you enjoyed it.

The Stonehenge paper is a near exact material copy of Strathmore Artagain paper except that the Stonehenge is a heavier weight and has the rough uncut (or rough torn) edged perimeter like many of the professional papers.

Happy Valentines Day from the surface of the moon!

Mark
*PS: I am still hinging on adding the earth (you might barely notice where I drew the circle to possibly add it at just right of center page.) Thanks for the input from all of you on this.

#7 varmint

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:42 AM

Mark,

Great sketch, I'm thinking you've already decided you want to add the earth to the sketch, you're just hoping we all jump up and say "yes please do!" :grin: I'm just kidding. I can go either way, but if it were my sketch and I decided to add it, I'd crop away the crater detail above as I don't think it would quite work well. But that's my opinion.

I can see where you have positioned the Earth in the sketch, it's quite a composition and I'm sure it'd look great regardless.

#8 markseibold

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 06:52 AM

Jim

Thanks for your input. I'll just have to do another work. It could have become more or less. It is definitely quite different than I planned. It evolved as I worked on it and something new emerged. This is what I find so compelling about sketching with pastels. There are great unforseen images that appear to manifest unexpected. The unintentional smearing of the chalk at times can be stunning and surprizing. I wish that I could post a larger image. Perhaps I'll start attaching a link for that because I feel that much of the fine detail cannot be seen here. Remember the sheet of paper I use is 20" X 25" so it is reduced to maybe 1/10 size here on the screen. I just refigured that to 1/25th size? I am not sure now but the image is considerably smaller on the screen than the original.

I guess I could do about anything but I don't think that I could remove the crater detail from observation as that would render the work as only fantasy and relegate it to only the art forum. The moderators have been quite kind and fair about this and I must commend them.

What would it take to get a sketch to win over the photography again in the monthly contest? My feeling is that the sketch would have to be so realistic as a technical work from observation yet somehow so beautiful that it would fool a photographer and win over their hearts for sheer beauty and awe at the same time. Am I getting close yet? :cool: I know I may be trying to convolute too much into one work at times. I am really only dabbling here. I have held off doing art for most of my recent life and just now letting it go to astronomical heights. I feel that I have to make up for lost time.

Jay mentioned earlier that I should submit this [somewhere.] Other than the CN monthly sketch contest in two weeks at the end of February (I am already in the current one for January) does anyone have any other suggestions? It would have to be something current in the sky to qualify for Spaceweather or APOD, and I have been there a few times already. Perhaps I need to write an extensive column about astronomical pastel sketching and submit it with my better images to S & T or the like.

Thanks for any further input from any of you,

Mark

#9 frank5817

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 05:35 PM

Mark,

Before you add a crescent Earth, remember the crescent Earth would be above the sun in this landscape of Grimaldi you have created.

Frank :)

#10 RobertED

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 11:47 PM

WOW!!, that's wild!!! :ooo:

#11 markseibold

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 05:39 AM

Frank

Thanks for that information; Didn’t you say earlier not to taint this sketch with the earth? I may do it in a future work but decided to leave this as is on your early advice.

Yes, I thought about that quite a bit. I tried to render the light of the sun as appearing to come from just behind the broken rilled walls in the near distance as rising low on the horizon. The image of this location and lunar day, I believe would be experiencing the sunrise, so the sun would be quite low. I suppose the Earth might be anywhere in the central sky but knew that it would be back-lit and if any appreciable sunlit image of it would appear as somewhat of a crescent phase; the lit edge being at the bottom of the earths disc in relation to the moons surface. So the earth might appear as a large "U" shape or smile in the sky with the sun below it. Am I figuring this right? Just as we see a new moon in the west at sunset or old moon morning at sunrise in the east. *See reverse images of this in the opening scene of the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, where the sun is above with a moon below it showing a crescent phased ‘overhead arch’ of light.

I thought about this but I am not the expert to figure the phases, celestial positions of and angle of incidence of light for a given scene on the moon. I just briefly thought of the logical configuration. I saw a book the other day, Observing the Moon- (authors name- North. Excellent, as he states the longitudinal angles of lunar surface features. There must be some here in CN that know these equations? I think many people just assume that the earth to always be that three quarter phase that they see in Apollo mission photos.

I would be interested to hear if others will offer some input about this.

Thanks again for raising this issue Frank, as I want to be technically accurate.

Mark

#12 CarlosEH

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 11:26 AM

Mark,

Fantastic renderings of the light shaft that you observed over the crater Grimaldi. Your space art rendering reminds me of the works of Bonestell. Thank you for sharing it with us all.

Carlos

#13 markseibold

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 11:55 PM

Robert
Thank you! I feel wid sometimes when I do these works :cool:

Carlos

Thank you for the kind words; I have along way to go to match Bonestell; but I'm glad that you enjoyed it.

Tom

I am sorry that I ran out of names to remember while replying,:foreheadslap::tonofbricks: I am rereading now that you were the one to advise me to not render the earth into this work. I have been scattered and not entirely in tune with replying to messages lately, so I apologize for forgetting to respond to you.

I appreciate that you suggested leaving the earth out.

Thanks again to all of you,

Mark

#14 JayinUT

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 02:29 AM

Mark,

Sounds like it is time to try S&T or Astronomy or someone and let them do a column on sketching. I also was reading the October 2007 back issue of the RASC which on page 201 has an article on sketching. You could read that and perhaps see if they would be interested in someone south of the border so to speak.

Here's the link JRASC Oct 2007 where you can download the issue.

#15 markseibold

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 01:00 PM

Jay

Thanks again for your interest in my work and for the link to possibly do a column on astro sketch art. I will have to work up a story to accompany it and as to what I would submit as several sketch works. I will welcome any suggestions as to what to write about what I do. Perhaps I could mention in a possible article that sketch-artworks occasionally win over the photography in the monthly contest here. I am shocked to see that this morning as all the photographs are equally beautiful accomplished works. I think this is my first to win over the photography. Charlie announced it this morning -Mark >

http://www.cloudynig...t/1#Post2930488

#16 JayinUT

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 01:35 PM

Mark,

That is tremendous and well deserved! You have a fantastic talent. Someone should pick your work up as I think it is wonderful.

As you mention, the talent here is amazing and I am envious of the many skilled experts here in both the sketching and astrophotography sections.

#17 markseibold

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 12:49 PM

I do not necessarily mean to repost this to the top of the list. I just realized as I checked my info that I mistakenly reported the observation date as January 7th 2009. It was actually February 7th 2009. -Mark






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