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New Sky-Watcher "Heritage 130" Mini-Collapsible

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#1 Mike Ducharme

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 06:59 PM

The new mini-collapsible Sky-Watcher somebody spotted on the Synta website now has a page on the Sky-Watcher site and the scope is called the "Heritage 130". It's not linked into the site anywhere, I just found it by calling up a recent product and randomly changing the product ID number in the URL:

http://www.skywatche...duct.php?id=146

The photo is obviously wrong as it is the 8" dob photo, so some of the other specs listed may still be wrong, but it's interesting nonetheless.

#2 panhard

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 07:31 PM

The weights of the tube and ground board are the same as an 8". So I would guess everything else is very questionable.

#3 Doug76

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 09:03 PM

Very questionable. Likely a correction is coming in the photo department.

#4 Deep13

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 09:51 AM

The collapsible tube is nice and all, but that won't make the rocker box any smaller.

#5 Doug76

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 03:57 PM

Deep13, that's gotta be the wrong picture. That, as stated above, has to be the 8", not this new one they are talking about. I figure they'll find out their mistake, and put in the real photo of it.

#6 Keithdrengen

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 03:00 PM

A 6" collapsible would be just for me, but this is a great idea too.

#7 DSalters

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 11:59 AM

This certainly is an excellent design. It beats the heck out of having to take off truss poles and still having fairly large UTA and lower tubes (Lightbridge). This allows a one-piece scope to be collapsed into something quite easy to move around. I can see this design going a long way with customers.

#8 TONGKW

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 08:21 PM

I come across an advertisement of this Dob, it is called Skywatcher mini Dob P130. It is at present on sale in China at RMB968 (approx. US$150) but I don’t know when it shall be on sale elsewhere.
http://www.hkastrofo...pic.php?t=13972

K W TONG
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C8 + CG-5GT, TSA102 + HEQ5 PRO, MK67 + Voyager Mount, WO ZS 80FD + Kenko NES, NexStar 6SE, WO Megrez 72 + Mizar K Mount, Mini Borg 50, C5, PST

#9 PianoPaul

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 09:07 PM

IMO that's going to need some shielding for the secondary, and two poles won't be strong enough, even for such a small structure.
Where are the focus knobs? is it helical? I like helical focusers on newts, but if it were the quality of the r&p focusers we expect to find on this level of instrument, ykes!

I think Newts this small are better off as solid tubes, for a number of reasons: keep body heat out of the light path, and why not make it a few inches longer than 'necessary', to have a light baffle/dew shield?

I don't like the looks of this design, functionally. Cute, though.

#10 rmollise

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 01:13 PM

I come across an advertisement of this Dob, it is called Skywatcher mini Dob P130. It is at present on sale in China at RMB968 (approx. US$150) but I don’t know when it shall be on sale elsewhere.
http://www.hkastrofo...pic.php?t=13972

K W TONG
----------------
C8 + CG-5GT, TSA102 + HEQ5 PRO, MK67 + Voyager Mount, WO ZS 80FD + Kenko NES, NexStar 6SE, WO Megrez 72 + Mizar K Mount, Mini Borg 50, C5, PST


IOW, a mutant StarBlast. Cute, I gotta say...

;)

#11 Keithdrengen

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 01:44 PM

Hmm wasnt able to see the picture before now, I would have liked the "Flextube" design more, more robust. (Is that a word in english?)

#12 paul hart

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 01:52 PM

Looks pretty neat.

#13 sabir

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 02:08 PM

Had posted about this quite a while back Mini Dob :smirk:

Sabir

#14 jason_kelly

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Posted 28 April 2009 - 10:32 PM

It's for sale in canada for 209CAD. I will be getting one for my daughter, looks great. Much more usable than the Celestron mini version!
Here's the link!
http://www.maisonast...suppliers_key=1

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#15 GreekGeek

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 12:04 AM

I just got one of these as a travel scope and for the mrs. to use when home. I've used it a couple of times (cools much faster than the 8-inch one and I won't wake the wife up moving it around).

The focuser is indeed helical. Not bad though. I haven't had problems with it so far. It keeps collimation well-enough (120km round trip on not too great Greek roads and not a screw needed to be tightened according to my laser colli), it is very portable and it can give you pretty good images. With the 10mm eyepiece supplied and a 2X Barlow I could make some detail on Jupiter's surface easily enough, and the moon was quite pleasant. I pushed it all the way to X162 (8mm Hyperion and 2X Barlow) and the views were not bad at all.

The bad is the optical finder (to much paralax, if I'm saying that right) and the absence of a shroud which can be annoying if the neighbours heep their lights on.

Should you get one? I'm pretty happy with mine. I need to figure out how to shroud it (working on that) and what to do with the awful finder (probably get a Telrad or a laser for it), but for the money it's a great travel or "kid" scope. The mrs. loves it already.

Dimitri

#16 jason_kelly

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 01:39 AM

The one for sale in Canada has a laser finder so sounds like a good buy to me. Will be ordering one for my daughter's birthday for sure. Glad to here the focuser is ok. Seems like a great tarvel scope to me!
Cheers
Jason

#17 WWPierre

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 09:51 AM

I bought one as a first scope about 5 months ago. I love it. I even wrote a review and submitted it here, but nobody got back to me.

#18 WWPierre

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 10:00 AM

Here are a couple of pics

Attached Files



#19 WWPierre

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 10:03 AM

and another with my Celestron Zoom installed.

I carefully applied some vasiline to the focuser threads and they work a lot smoother.

I have no problem with the red dot finder, once I zeroed it in it stays spot on.

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#20 ajg

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 05:00 PM

I bought one of these for my Dad's birthday present. Had to take it out before I handed it over ... just to make sure everything was OK :grin:
It's got it's flaws - the helical focuser isn't great, the secondary suspended on a single arm could be better, the stock eyepieces are exactly what you'd expect, but for the money that's nitpicking.
I picked it up on a 10% discount for about £110 - borderline theft on my part IMO.
Was very impressed with the view through it, the portability, you can store it almost anywhere. No complaints whatsoever. An excellent starting point for a newbie or for somebody on a tight budget.
Great value.

#21 skyward_eyes

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 05:16 PM

I looked all over for this little scope as I would like to get one to add to my collection of IYA '09 stuff. Where do you get them from? Skywatcher USA didnt have them.

#22 WWPierre

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 06:36 PM

Only available in Europe and Canada so far. I expect the Skywatcher Collapsable Dobs to dominate the market once they are introduced into the states.

#23 WWPierre

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 06:44 PM

What the heck, they didn't seem to want to publish the review I submitted here, so I'll sneak it in the back door:)

A note: some of the parts I thought were cast aluminum are actually plastic, but what the hey. I have since purchased a Celestron 8mm-24mm Zoom. It's all I need, really. I love my little dob!

Since writing this article, I have had the opportunity to observe Jupiter under better conditions, and have been able to see four distinct brown cloud zones. I might even be able to bag the GRS with it some day.

Here ya go;

----------------------------------------------------------

July 19, 2009

Sky-Watcher 5” Collapsible Dobsonian Mount Telescope.

I have wanted a good telescope all my life, but I have been putting it off, thinking that I needed to be able to photograph what I found in the sky. This, of course, would have meant a considerable outlay, and there has never been the disposable income.

I realized recently that excellent photos of whatever I could find in the sky, taken by people with equipment and abilities orders of magnitude better than I could ever hope to achieve, were only clicks away in Cyberspace. This flash of insight brought the possibility of amateur astronomy from my back yard immediately within my grasp. I drove to Vancouver Telescope Centre, and on the advice of Nick Seiflow there, I purchased a Sky-Watcher Heritage 5” collapsible Newtonian telescope on a Dobsonian mount.

One might think that the review of a piece of equipment by a relative newbie might be questionable. The reader should know that I have a small collection of optical survey instruments, and know how to operate them, I have a basic understanding of optics and engineering, and I know how to recognize quality when I run across it.

Specifications:
Primary Mirror: 5” – 130mm diameter
Focal Length: 25” - 650mm
Speed: F/5


What Comes In The Box

The telescope comes well packaged and protected from shock, making purchasing on the internet a viable option for those who are far removed from a retailer. The box contains the collapsed assembled telescope and Dobsonian mount, a red dot finder, (a zero magnification pointing tool that superimposes a small red dot on the night sky), two 1-1/4” generic eyepieces, 25mm and 10mm, and an 8-page instruction manual.

The Construction:

The main components of the body are black matte powder coated cast aluminium. They are the mirror cell holder, the top tube end, the secondary mirror/eyepiece holder, the dovetail slide, and the altitude swivel. The mirror cell seems to be cast aluminium as well. All the castings seem to be of good quality and well finished.

The tube itself is sheet metal, attached to the top and bottom castings with screws. The inside is painted matte black and the exterior is decorated with a cool graphic listing the names of historically significant astronomers to commemorate the International Year of Astronomy.

The collapsing mechanism consists of two steel rods attached to the front secondary mirror/eyepiece casting and passing through corresponding holes in the top tube casting. There are machined detents in the ends of these rods, which engage ball-bearing stops when the scope is extended or collapsed. The rods are precisely machined, and once the knurled locking screws are snugged up, the scope attains precise alignment.

When the telescope is in collapsed mode, a well designed and robust plastic dust cap protects the optics.

The Dobsonian mount is constructed of (probably) particle board with a melamine surface. The altitude swivel has a cast aluminium slide which engages the full-length dovetail on the side of the tube, and tightens with a generous knurled screw. This allows the telescope to be perfectly balanced around the altitude swivel. There is a large tension knob, and a ball bearing, infinitely adjustable tensioning mechanism. The azimuth motion, like most Dobs, slides on Teflon or Nylon bearings on the triangular base.

The Red Dot Finder:

This is a wonderful little accessory which mounts with two setscrews to a small dovetail cast into the secondary mirror/eyepiece casting at the front of the scope. It has knurled vertical and horizontal adjustment controls and is easily lined up with the telescope. It is powered by a 3 volt lithium battery, (supplied).

The Manual:

This is well written and illustrated. Besides describing assembly and operation, there is a primer on optical mathematics, another on basic stargazing, and collimation instructions.


The Optics:

The primary mirror is adjusted by three knurled screws, which are easily accessed while looking through the eyepiece. Together with these are three larger knurled locking screws which must be loosened to adjust the primary mirror, and snugged up again after adjustment.

The secondary mirror is mounted on a two-piece cast aluminium assembly suspended from the front casting on one ¼” steel rod. There are three set screws for alignment of the secondary mirror which are adjusted by a small Allen wrench, (not supplied)

The eyepiece holder is cast aluminium and screws into the receiver on the front casting. The threads are not machined, and consequently are somewhat loose. These threads are the focusing mechanism, and focusing is achieved by screwing the eyepiece holder in and out. The eyepieces are held in the eyepiece holder by knurled set screws, which double as convenient focusing knobs.

The eyepieces are the generic no-name ones one would expect to get with an entry-level telescope. When I asked the dealer for the specifications, this is the reply I received:

Unfortunately, there are no published specs on the eyepieces, but if
I were to give an educated guess, I would
say that the fields of view are 50 degrees for the 25mm and about 40
degrees for the 10mm.
The eye relief, respectively, will be 18mm and 13mm, and again these
are estimates only (could be 2mm more for each)

The magnification from the 25mm eyepiece is 26x and that of the 10mm is 65x

The Seeing:

I am located in a yellow light pollution zone at sea level, and my eyepieces are less than optimal, however, the performance of this instrument is surprisingly good, even under these conditions. I was able to see the almost edge-on rings of Saturn before it disappeared behind the mountain to the West. I was not able to discern any detail on the surface of Jupiter, but it was again low on the horizon, and I was looking through a lot of dirty air. The moons were nice crisp points of light. M3 is easily seen with both eyepieces, and looking closer to the zenith at Mizar and Alcor, I was able to see surrounding stars down to the 11th magnitude. I am confident that a dark sky site will substantially improve the performance of this little instrument, and better eyepieces will improve it even further. The basic optics seem rock solid, and it would not surprise me to be seeing down to 13th or 14th magnitude objects once the telescope is improved to it’s maximum potential.

I have built a small table for my scope, and it takes less than a minute to get it set up and begin scanning the skies. I often use it to watch the mountain climbers on the Stwamus Chief across the valley, (of course, they are upside down and reversed, but I have an erecting eyepiece on order)

The Negatives:

What can I say, there are none. I was at first disappointed with the looseness of the focusing screw, but use has proven this not to be a major issue, and an initial roughness in the focusing action was probably caused by the powder coating, and use has tended to lap the mating surfaces together, improving the smoothness.

It is a maxim in Amateur Astronomy that the best scope is the one that gets used. Although I have no experience of other telescopes for comparison, this telescope seems to have the ability to fulfill many roles with little compromise. I would highly recommend it to anyone.

Peter B. Legere - 49.41.37N 123.09.29W

#24 WWPierre

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 07:03 PM

Some detail photos

Attached Files



#25 WWPierre

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 07:05 PM

Post deleted by WWPierre






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