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My first Saturn...

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#1 sunrutas

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 11:03 AM

Hi!

At last, at the end of this week , we had fair weather up here in Sweden.

So I took the opportunity to catch some avi´s with my new DBK 21AU04.AS colour camera.

At first I managed to capture 3 avi´s before the clouds came rolling in... the seeing was really bad, sometimes everything blurred up into a gray ball..

About an hour later, the clouds had passed and it was clear again!
This time I shot about 15 avi´s with different camera settings. The seeing was a little bit better than before, but still hardly mediocre.

The scopes I used was my Vixen ED100SF and my friend Magnus´s Orion Optics 8" f/6, 1/6 PTV reflector.
For magnification I used an Intes 2,4X Barlow lens.

With the Vixen refractor, I used an ir/uv blocking filter.
No filters was used with the reflector.

The first thing I found out, was that I need more power to "fill out" the chip.

And with the DBK camera, (on Saturn), I will have to use at least an 8" scope to resolve Saturn "properly"... I had to set the gain setting at maximum to even see it on the screen, with the Vixen 100...

We had our gear set up on Magnus´s balcony, so his CG5 GT mount was used this night.
He also was in charge of the hand control to track the planet, while I was busy operating the camera and focusing.

As this is my first effort to capture Saturn, I can´t be too dissapointed with the final results...

I will be most grateful for your opinions and thoughts, how I can improve the results!

-A more powerful Barlow lens, eyepiece projection, a bigger scope? -All suggestions are welcome!

I also have an Orion Optics 8" f/6 1/4 ptv. reflector, and an Orion Optics OMC 140 mak, that I am going to try as soon as the weather allows.

This picture is shot with the Orion Optics 8" f/6, 1/6 PTV reflector.

Kind regards/Roger!

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#2 sunrutas

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 11:08 AM

Here is another one, shot with my Vixen ED100SF... this image is perfect for those who like to count pixels... As you see, a 2,4X Barlow wont enlarge the image enough...

I am afraid that if I use higher magnification, the image will be too faint, when using the Vixen 100...

Perhaps eyepiece projection is the right way to go?

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#3 solshaker

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 11:27 AM

great results for a first shot, Roger. the first one is a little overexposed but the rings across the planet show up very well. i can make out the cassini division also.

looking forward to more.

#4 sunrutas

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 01:27 PM

Thanks for the kind words.

I am already planning for the next imaging session!
Until I have got me a new, more powerful Barlow, I´ll either use my OMC 140, because of its focal lenght (2000 mm), or my Orion Optics 8" f/6, with eyepiece projection, to enlarge the image on the sensor.

/Roger!

#5 Dr Morbius

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 01:46 PM

Keep at it Roger, you're doing well!

#6 Chris_H

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 03:12 PM

Just add a Barlow. Your 8 inch has the same focal length as my telescope and I think I get a good image scale with a 3x barlow. Add a 5x if you need more ;)

#7 Trever

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 03:46 PM

I have used a barlow to get up to F/30 on Jupiter or Saturn. It really depends on the seeing conditions, camera settings and optics used.

You are on the right track though! Looks great!.






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