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#1 David Pavlich

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 01:52 PM

I just checked several webpages looking for the pixel scale of the Orion Starshoot Autoguider. Any of you guys know?

Thanks again! David

#2 rsbfoto

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 02:05 PM

I just checked several webpages looking for the pixel scale of the Orion Starshoot Autoguider. Any of you guys know?

Thanks again! David


What about this ?

Orion StarShoot AutoGuider

* Finally, an easy-to-use, affordable autoguider for long-exposure astrophotography
* Uses a 1/2" format 1.3MP CMOS chip, with 5.2 x 5.2 micron pixels for highly accurate guiding
* Compact housing measures just 2.5" x 2.35" and weighs a mere 4.4 oz.
* Included software offers automatic calibration and guiding with a single mouse click
* Powered via your computer's high-speed USB 2.0 connection; no other power source needed
* ST4 compatible autoguide output jack on camera body

Just read slowly the

web page of Orion and you will be enlightened

2nd sentence :grin:

#3 David Pavlich

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 02:23 PM

If this is the sentence that you've pointed out (Uses a 1/2" format 1.3MP CMOS chip, with 5.2 x 5.2 micron pixels for highly accurate guiding), it tells me the size of the pixels.

Pixel scale is measured in arcseconds/pixel.

So....I'm not enlightened. ;)

David

#4 jrcrilly

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 02:26 PM

If this is the sentence that you've pointed out (Uses a 1/2" format 1.3MP CMOS chip, with 5.2 x 5.2 micron pixels for highly accurate guiding), it tells me the size of the pixels.

Pixel scale is measured in arcseconds/pixel.

So....I'm not enlightened. ;)

David


It tells you everything the camera manufacturer can know. Imaging scale is based on that figure and the focal length of the telescope - which the camera manufacturer cannot know. With that figure and your focal length you are all set.

#5 LLEEGE

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 02:31 PM

Dave, CCDCalculator will give you the scale by plugging in the above figures and your scope figures.

#6 rsbfoto

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 02:51 PM

If this is the sentence that you've pointed out (Uses a 1/2" format 1.3MP CMOS chip, with 5.2 x 5.2 micron pixels for highly accurate guiding), it tells me the size of the pixels.

Pixel scale is measured in arcseconds/pixel.

So....I'm not enlightened. ;)

David


Hi David,

Sorry ... for my stupid answer but you already got some more answers so I guess your question is answered ...

#7 Moggi1964

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 04:06 PM

I had forgotten all about the CCDCalculator - brilliant little tool. Isn't there one that shows you the FOV of the setup as a graphical output Luke?

#8 David Pavlich

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 06:11 PM

Thanks, guys. As usual, question answered!! :bow:

David






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