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Eddington to Olbers: A Lunar Triptych

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#1 kraterkid

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 09:37 PM

Starting from the top, 81 km Pre-Nectarian ring plain Eddington is is merely a remnant of a once large, complex crater. Having formed from an impact only a few hundred million years after the Moon was formed some 4.5 billion years ago, it may have kept it's rugged walls, glacis and central peaks for nearly a billion years before the glowing basalt floods of Oceanus Procellarum cascaded over it's rim, inundating it's floor and nearly filling it to the brim. To the east Eratosthenian aged, 44 km Seleucus, displays youthfulness in it's fresh looking walls and terraces. Further down the terminator, Upper Imbrium Krafft and Cardanus appear to be a perfect pair, at 53 and 51 km respectively, and besides their near identical appearance, they also share a rille-like structure that lunar orbiters have identified to be a catena, a linear alignment of overlapping craters. It is still uncertain where these secondaries originated. At the bottom of the triptych, and formed only a few hundred millions of years after the Eddington impact, lies the degraded walls of 77 km Nectarian Olbers. It's somber lava plain is covered in deep shadow. To the east, enigmatic Gamma Reiner, a surficial stain on Oceanus Procellarum, is associated with a strong magnetic anomaly. It has been proposed that it represents the remains of a comet collision, or possibly the results of an antipodal impact.

Sketch details:

Subject: Eddington to Olbers Rukl: 17, 28
Time: 10:30pm - 1:30 PDT Date: May 7-8, 2009
Seeing: Antoniadi II-III Weather: clear
Lunation: 13.01 days
Colongitude: 73.2 deg.
Illumination: 98.9%
Lib. in Lat.: +06 deg. 57 min.
Lib. in Long.: +05 deg. 27 min.
Phase: 11.1 deg.
Telescope: 12" Meade SCT f/10
Binoviewer: Denkmeier BV-25 with 2X nosepiece
45 deg. W.O. erect image diagonal
Eyepieces: 26mm Meade Super Plossls
Magnification: 234X
Medium:Sketch White and black Conte' on Black 400 Strathmore Artagain paper
Sketch size: Triptych composed of three 9x12 sheets of paper

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#2 kraterkid

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 09:43 PM

Here's the triptych arranged on the page so you can see the entire sketch without scrolling:

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#3 cildarith

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 11:32 PM

Beautiful observation, Rich! :bow:

#4 kraterkid

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 11:58 PM

Thank you Eric! :D I must admit to being totally exhausted after this sketch was finished. Best seeing I've had since moving here a few months ago. The wind never even whispered last night.

#5 terrapin

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 04:21 AM

Great post and sketch. I spent a lot of time checking out Eddington last night and you really captured it. Nice to read about how/when it was formed. Thanks! :bow:

#6 CarlosEH

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 07:18 AM

Rich,

An excellent observation and report of this lunar tritych. An interesting area of the Moon. Tahnk you for sharing it with us all.

Carlos

#7 kraterkid

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 10:57 AM

Thanks so much Terripan and Carlos! :thanx:

It's a area often overlooked because it's at its prime one day before full Moon or new Moon.

#8 Sol

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 07:22 PM

Superb sketch and great to be able to read the landscape at the same time from the text description - thanks!

Mark

#9 rolandlinda3

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 09:10 PM

Very nice. Hope to try tonight on the Mojave Desert West of Lancaster near the edge. Roland

#10 kraterkid

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 09:41 PM

Thanks for the kind words Mark and Roland! :D

Have a look at multi-ringed basin Mare Humboltianum, limbward of Endymion or perhaps further south to the complex floor fractured crater Gauss. I'm going out tonight but the Jacumba winds may make sketching tough. :p

#11 markseibold

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 05:48 AM

Rich

What can I say? Beautiful sketching by you again. :bow: :bow: :bow: It is good to see you return with such great work again. This is really a labor of the love to sketch from intense observation with artistic mastery.

I appreciate your efforts to assemble three panels and especially your admittance of being exhausted. I know the feeling after intensive observing time over the eyepiece and simultaneously employing the labor intensive sketching. This is yet another element that those who have never sketched may not understand. It can take tremendous concentration and effort. Many will say that this is merely fun, but great artwork demands great perseverance and effort at times.

Thanks for posting and all your detailed text, as this also serves as a great lesson for others.

Mark

#12 kraterkid

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 11:02 AM

Thanks for the very kind words Mark! :D

Sketching does seem to demand much more energy at the time of the observation. To a large extent that's due to the need to make hundreds of cross checks on the shapes, shading and positions of features. It's observe, sketch, confirm or modify and observe again, in an almost endlessly repeating cycle. However, the rewards of returning with a drawing that is an accurate representation of what you saw is very gratifying.






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