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Luna tonight 30th

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#1 daniel_h

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 05:00 AM

Thought i would try pastel luna with my new blending tool - how wrong was I, felt frustrated could not get nay detail i wanted - thru my new steiner 20x80 (taksharp).
Any advice appreciated how would i go about getting some crater detail, can i use something black on the black paper? i will make a wooden read:harder blending tool to scratch the pastel i think

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#2 JimPie

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 11:50 AM

Daniel,
I have no experience using pastels. I'll let those that do give advice.
I will say the moon is in my opinion the most difficult night sky object to sketch (Ive never posted my attempts -there quite bad). I dont think your sketch is bad for a first attempt.

#3 frank5817

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 05:44 PM

Daniel,

First of all I like your sketch it shows highlands, maria and earthshine. It's the moon and a waxing crescent at that. :jump:
I can see the texture in your paper. Judging from that I would guess the moon size in your sketch is less than 3 inches(76 mm) across. If that is true it would be very difficult to sketch craters using pastel pencils. You will need a black pastel or charcoal pencil for the shadows and/or you can use a shaped eraser to remove the white pastel to creat shadow. If I were you I would use a larger amount of paper to create a larger sketch.
It is clear from what you have done here that you will be able to sketch the moon the way you want it to look in short order. Do save this sketch so you can watch your sketching evolution and look back to your first moon sketch with white on black. :cool:

Frank :)

#4 rolandlinda3

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 11:07 PM

Frank has given you good comments and advice. Keep using the pastels...but start with a little larger sketch paper and a smaller target along with his other advice and you will find it very exciting. Pastels do not yield fine detail easily but they are wonderful for depth. Let your last steps be to add white for the brightest (highest things) and black for the deepest/darkest shadow regions and your apparent relief will be really nice.

Roland

#5 markseibold

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 12:33 AM

Daniel

A great rough impression with an old world feel :bow: :bow: :bow: You've got the earthshine and some mare area shading down quite well.

I used paper napkins and cotton swabs for years before ever using a blending stump. I now use an array of all blending tools depending on the surface size being worked; [but never my fingers as the oil can blemish and stain the paper.]

You did not mention the format size that you worked in here. I am guessing a 9" X 12" Strathmore Artagain tablet?

Yes, the blending is only part of the process so do not get too hung up on that. Fine details can be rendered in small format but I find it difficult to work so small if its details you want. Frank and Roland have offered some good pointers. You might try copying as much lineage first then color in large areas. Once you have all those details, blending can come last as a finishing touch although I blend lightly sometimes midway in my artworks just to give me some sense of place and progress as I work. [*It is always a work in progress as I never consider a work done; only abandoned.] You will find that everyone develops their own techniques. I do not mean to say that there are no rules in art but you will borrow some from many others to eventually develop your own.
It’s the old adage; practice makes perfect. And did I mention mistakes? Relax; there are none! :cool: It is part of the learning process in any art. It adds up to automatic improvement in the next work. Always something great to look forward to.

Good luck and I look forward to seeing your next sketch work,

Mark
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My CN Sketch Gallery

An artist’s work is never done; only abandoned.
-Arthur C. Clarke

#6 daniel_h

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 01:36 AM

thanks for the comments guys, yes i did use a small sheet - about 6x10" - have got some bigger though, makes sense

#7 markseibold

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 02:10 AM

Daniel

Just to reiterate, as Roland mentioned that pastels may not be great for detail, that may apply to pastel sticks which become blunt with use, but pastel pencils can be made razor sharp easily. I keep a single edge razor, hand held pencil sharpener and fine sand paper on hand to sharpen the pastel pencils.

You will discover many tricks with use over time and this is part of the enjoyment as you hone your practice and skills.

If you have art supply stores in your area, the employees are usually quite helpful on suggesting materials as they too are usually artists that have used the mediums extensively.

Good luck,

Mark






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