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Moon last night; Several surface features 06-02-09

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#1 markseibold

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 02:43 PM

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As it was a beautifully balmy evening with clearing and the gibbous moon showing many interesting features, no less the magnificent terminator, I set up to sit out for several hours and decide which features I would render in pastel. As I began to observe without sketching for the first half hour with approximately 68 F temperatures, light wind degraded seeing. Then still air followed by 10 PM and seeing was steady for some time.

I began observing about 9:45 PM PDT and finished about 1 AM. I focused on Sinus Iridum again with Plato, Copernicus for the first time [left unfinished as I did not include its rays, only concentrating on the crater walls and rim], a roughed in Mare Crisium, also unfinished but included Proclus and its rays roughed in. It was amazing to see how the terminator changed over three hours. I had to leave some features as is in the original hour. This is an artistic license that tests ones observing abilities; the changing effects of what we assume is a static and unchanging moon. The light and dark moving at the terminator is actually quite dynamic!

The detail at middle left was at the terminator but I cannot identify it. What caught my eye was a light shaft that I only rendered roughly at the middle of the detail, as I originally intended to feature it as the main subject of this work. I could actually note over a few minutes time the light creeping across this craters floor! I instead became lost in so many other surface images, that I was overwhelmed and began to feel sorry for those who raced by in their cars in the street next to me. They don't know what they are missing! I see my charts at possibly somewhere between Epimenides, Elger and Palus. Will someone confirm this? Again after about three hours I was fatigued at 1AM as seeing degraded and the moon was low in the atmosphere. I continued inside with the whole moon image [at 10" diameter] earlier only roughed in from low power at the telescope by finishing with use of photos I took through the telescope eyepiece for reference. The foreground lunar landscape was done last, finishing at 4 AM this morning, entirely from imagination. It could be a rille or walled plain not necessarily related to any of the observed features. Perhaps I imagined standing on the surface with that shaft of light approaching.

Various pastels on 20" X 32” coal black Stonehenge paper.

Mark
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My CN Gallery

#2 JayinUT

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 06:02 PM

Beautiful crisp clear details of the craters and I love your Mara's, they are mysterious to me. I enjoy the contrast of shadows throughout the sketch and love your contrast of light and dark along the terminator.

#3 Tommy5

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 07:09 PM

Great series of sketches, i like the way it is put together

#4 frank5817

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 09:00 PM

Mark,

Do you realize you have 7 wonderful sketches on one piece of large black paper. I like the way your sketches look on that very dark paper. You used some very nice subtle colors too. Excellent sketching.. no ..Super excellent sketching.:waytogo: :cool: :bow:

Frank :)

#5 kraterkid

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 12:45 AM

Mark keep on doing what you are doing, it is totally awesome sketching! :bow: :jump: :bow: I totally agree with Jay, Tommy and Frank. Wonderful presentation, crisp contrast and very beautiful and subtle color. :waytogo: :waytogo: :waytogo:

#6 terrapin

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 07:04 AM

Excellent! Really like your rendition of the "jeweled handle" of Sinus Iridium (I think Patrick Moore named it thus). I was captivated by that region at the same time you were sketching it...was really beautiful watching the "handle" solidify.

Thanks for posting! :bow:

#7 markseibold

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 11:32 AM

Thanks Jay, Tommy, Frank, Rich and Terrapin

Jay; yes, what can I say about mysterious? It is mostly accidental as those mare features you mention are really left as unfinished {and really rough abstracts with some details lacking] as I fatigue trying to do too much. This is the beauty of pastels when newbies ask, how to blend. I would have them recalling the fun of finger painting as a child. Picasso said, “When you go to do art you must think like a child again.” It comes out as abstract and many people will see different things in it, which can make it fun but the mind really wants to control it. That is the hard part to let go as an artist. [Read: Abstract Expressionist Art.] I am straddling many dangerous fence posts here. Enough said about that for now.

Tommy, thanks; but I do not know if I am really putting it together right. It is really all done as random access as my brain ROM is set to stun. :cool:

Frank; thanks for reminding me that I did seven sketches? (; I forget to count sometimes and I know I am compromising on quality of image when I do this.)
It may have been seven too many all at once as I reached burnout after an hour or two but continued for some details as I think of your great crater close-ups at times. I know I need to stop and do one like yours eventually. Do you know the region names on the left detail? Sorry it is rough and I made some line mistakes. I’ll attach a photo I took of it below later.

Rich- Thanks, its fun at times but you know I am compromising the real fine details in doing too much in a short time of each work. As we discussed the fatigue that builds, I am sure other artists here know what we are saying. At near 55 my eyes are giving up the ghost now. I cannot focus on the real world for an hour or so after executing one of these works as Jeff asked the other day if I take breaks. There is no time for breaks when the moon is setting in the western haze at 2 AM and I have to make seven somewhat detailed sketches in 2 or 3 hours!?. I can always sleep later. I am 20/400 vision without corrective lenses and I don’t wear bifocals. The repetitive observe-a-detail-sketch-and-back-to-the-eyepiece for several hundred eye muscle motions in a few hours is blinding me now. You know the process. So I should have these works in real exhibit somewhere before I die? I would like to put them into a book but how? What an expensive process that could be. I just hope to exhibit then all soon in a local gallery. I would rather lecture about them as the real pieces are more impressive to see up close than in the small Web screen. Can I travel on invites to do this as I hear the clock tick now. But schools and institutions are cutting budgets; hence no honorariums any longer.

Terrapin, thanks for reminding me of Patrick Moore’s description. I could not describe it as it changed over a couple hours. Yes; this is what hurried observers will miss. The changing dynamism of light on the lunar surface. It can literally change before our eyes as we sketch it . What a challenge to do great art! Some of my friends say a picture is a dead 2-dimensional image. I would say, “and yet it moves.” Galileo must have been beside himself when he discovered this and we must imagine how bad his optics were.

I was hoping that one of you might identify that middle left sketch as I got some lines wrong, I know it is really rough and probably not identifiable. It had that light shaft entering and changing fast. Any takers?

Thanks again to all,

Mark

#8 rodelaet

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 03:55 PM

Great sketches, Mark! :bow: :bow: :bow:

#9 markseibold

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 02:27 PM

Thanks Rony

I'm hoping that someone will identify that detail I placed at the middle left. Any guess as to what crater region it is?

Thanks again,

Mark

#10 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 05:06 AM

Mark,

Oustanding sketches of the Moon showing interesting regions. You have captured the lunar terrain over these regions very nicely. Pastels are such a wonderful medium for the Moon as exhibited by you, Frank, Dee, and other talented members on the forum. Thank you for sharing them with us all.

Carlos

#11 markseibold

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 02:01 PM

Thank you Carlos

I finally uploaded that rough image I snapped (1/20th Sec. f/3.2 at 400ASA) through the untracked-mounted 10.1" Dobsonian telescope with 9.7mm Plossl eyepiece; my Sony Cybershot 5 mgpxl digital camera mounted with tripod over the eyepiece. I over-layed an orange highlighted disc in Photoshop to indicate the light shaft area that I began to render (in the left detail) then left it unfinished to concentrate on other areas of the sketch. I was hoping that someone might identify a name for that region as it is not names in my charts (it is just below right of Clavius at the terminator in this photo.) The light is from the left coming between two walls; it stretches to the right and includes some small craters to its far right in a flat enclosed area. I watched the light fill into this area over a two hour period. It was a stunning and dynamic visual change to witness.

Thanks again,
Mark
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#12 kraterkid

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 11:02 PM

Hi Mark,

The area you have highlighted corresponds to Lacus Timoris, the "Lake of Fear". There is a large wall that is bisected by the mare fill of the lake and the light was creating a very beautiful ray at the time of your observation and sketch. Below your highlight is the famous "bear claw" of Capuanus, it's dramatic triangular shadow reaches into the nightside in your image.

#13 markseibold

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 06:09 PM

Rich

Recent PS (edited)

Thanks for responding with the info. I should have known that you are a walking encyclopedia of the moon! :cool: Just seeing these features names that you provided inspires me to not miss the terminator at this point next month again.

I need to study more of the surface features names. You, Frank, Erika, Roland and Carlos have taught me much about the moon since I have frequented the CN sketch forum. I tell many that I know, that the CN forums are like a live observational astronomy encyclopedia and not to me missed. There is something to learn here every time I return.

A young lady in Spain heads an astronomy club and has just contacted me after seeing my whole lunar sketches over the Portland skyline in Spaceweather after the Lunar-Venus Occultation April 22nd. She was enthralled with my 'whole moon art' and has included my site in their site in Spain now. Communications are difficult as she speaks little English; I know even less in Spanish. Her site also includes the sketching tutorials from several here in CN as I saw Erika's name at the end of a chapter in all the Spanish.

Leonora Hernandez' lunar sketches are spectacular as she has been seriously involved in astronomy since a young teenager. Maybe others here in CN should see this, if they are not aware. >

http://astronomadas.jimdo.com/
http://astronomadas....jo-astronomico/

And my drawing blog:
"Drawing the soul of the night" http://almadelanoche.blogspot.com/

-Mark

PS (edited) I just realized how she wanted to use my whole moon sketch as the main masthead to her new blog site - I just received this email explaining where - I must say I am impressed -Mark >
http://almadelanoche.blogspot.com/







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