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any one has hydraulic mount?

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#1 drg

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 11:52 AM

I have a Celestron C6-GT 150mm and built a roll off observatory and when I look toward the zenith my eyepiece is almost in the floor, I need to be able to incrrease the hight of the pier after I open the roof and be able to lower the peir to be able to close the roof.
may be someone have the same problem and can help me. :tonofbricks: :tonofbricks: :tonofbricks:

#2 scopeman

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 02:11 PM

Hi DRG,
I believe PierTech sells an electric extendable pier. I think it ran about 1500.00 or so. I have often thought about one because I would like to extend my pier a bit in my roll off too. Just isn't at the top of the list right now because of cash :bawling:
Regards,
Barry

#3 John Carruthers

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 03:05 AM

One of our members has an old hydraulic ram sunk in the ground and a foot pump to pump it up, works very well, he has a 10" F6 on it no problems. I think it was on a skip lorry in a former life but there are always a few in the scrap yard.

#4 Rusty

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 08:23 PM

Welcome to Cloudy Nights!

The parts Pier-Tech uses are available from McMaster-Carr; I priced them years ago, and I got my PT 2 for less then the price of the parts. However, if you have access to a hydraulic ram, pumps, and control valves, you yould save some money over a new PT.

#5 Luigi

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 07:38 AM

Just like to point out that it needn't be hydraulic. Any means to provide the mechanical advantage necessary to raise and lower the mount/scope smoothly should suffice. Could be a winch, screw, lever, etc.. I designed (but never built) a pier that moved up and down 10" using a manual lever and would precisely register in both positions. It would take some fabrication capability to implement...but I'm sure some saw dust devotee out there could come up with a wood design.

#6 John Carruthers

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 08:03 AM

True, JK uses a motorcycle jack for his fold up observatory.

#7 tim53

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 10:40 AM

Another option, requiring a sturdy mount, is to add weights to the focuser end of the OTA, so the CG is closer to the eyepiece end than the sky end. I did this for my 6" f/10 Jaegers by adding small (I think they're 3 pounds each) barbell weights to either side of the tube.

-Tim.

#8 drg

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 02:44 PM

I appreciate everyone in this forum that took time to answer to my question.
I have decided to use: Husky 12 Ton Bottle Jack

Model T91203H $25.00 from HomeDepot, I think it will do all I need it to do for a small price.I will keep everyone posted if it work.
Thanks to everyone

drg

#9 tim53

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 10:21 AM

Depending on where you live, you might also consider building something around a hydraulic ram from Harbor Freight - one of those used in engine hoists, with a long cylinder with lots of travel: hydraulic jack

Other suppliers probably also carry a similar product, but that one just came to mind.

In any case, you'd want one of these to do the lifting. You'll still need some pier structure that preserves polar alignment while you raise or lower your pier with it.

-Tim.






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