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Morning Mars fron from The Middle Volga

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#1 astrodoctor

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 01:41 PM

Hello, everybody!!!
It was the great oportunity to catch a picture of the Mars last sunday morning.
Meade LX 90 12" + 3x Barlou lens + DMK21, red filter. Stacked 1000 frames from 4000.
Russia, Ulyanovsk city, 28-june-2009. 01h. 05m. UT.
Mars alt. - 27 degrees, Sun alt. 4 degrees.

Thanks for looking!

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#2 iceman

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 01:49 PM

Very good image! Nice work!

#3 Sunspot

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 06:04 PM

Outstanding!!

#4 Freddy WILLEMS

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 10:57 PM

Wow, nice, well done doctor !
Lots of detail for that low altitude.
Hope to see more of your planetary imaging.

#5 Rick Woods

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 07:43 AM

That's the best image I've seen so far this apparition!

#6 dfell

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:33 AM

Agreed, the best so far :jump:

#7 Houdini

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 01:06 PM

Very nice, impressive amount of detail on a 5" disk low in the sky!

Robert

#8 Special Ed

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 04:00 PM

Astrodoctor,

Congratulations on this fine image. You were smart to follow Mars up into the sunlit sky. Not only was Mars at a higher altitude, but the seeing is often steady during twilight and early sunrise. I've experienced some of the best conditions for visual observing at that time.

Syrtis Major, the dark albedo feature on the central meridian in your image was first observed (and sketched) by Christiaan Huygens in 1659. Now we are seeing it again. :)

Below Syrtis Major (to the south) is the round Hellas Basin with the dark feature Zea Lacus within it. Dust storms can develop in the Hellas Basin, but the disk appears to be clear of dust in your picture.

Just south of Hellas, I can make out the very small South Polar Cap (SPC). It is early summer in the southern hemisphere of Mars (293.4° Ls at the time of your image), so one would expect the SPC to be small.

With images this sharp so early in the apparition, we should see many great pictures of Mars in the months to come. :cool:

#9 OMAR

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 06:18 PM

Very nice image, lots of detail there.
Bests.

#10 John Boudreau

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 07:26 PM

Very nice!

Fine detail for a sub 5" disc.

---John

#11 Kris.

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 11:14 AM

that's a lot of detail so early in the season! superb image, indeed the best i've seen so far!

#12 astrodoctor

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 12:12 PM

Thank you all for the replies!
It was really lucky morning for Mars imaging. Evrything has combined: very good optics, well colimated telescope, good camera and good red filter. The disc of Mars was free of dust storms.... The atmosfere condition was not very good, but I was able to select 1000 good frames and stuck them together. So you all can see the result. :jump:

#13 Rick Woods

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 12:19 PM

Below Syrtis Major (to the south) is the round Hellas Basin with the dark feature Zea Lacus within it.

By golly, you're right, Zea Lacus is plain as day! That's a very mysterious feature. I've seen it suggested that it marks the location of a dust-filled crater within Hellas that periodically becomes more or less visible. :D






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