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E200 - E6 Home Processing

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#26 Jim847

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 10:40 AM

A question from a newbee if you please. Where do you buy your film from? I'm located in Chicago and have used B&H in New York for some things online. I am also interested in processing supplies as well. Hope I'm not being ignorant and hijacking the thread but figured this purtained to the thread.

Jim

#27 TxStars

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 11:06 AM

I like Freestyle:
http://www.freestylephoto.biz/

#28 Geo.

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Posted 23 November 2010 - 06:29 PM

I'd vote Freestyle too. The service is fine and they seem to really be committed to "chemical" photography. Although they aren't going to help you with your Kodachrome, either. They have some interesting "cross processing" films intended to be processed and scanned.

#29 Retsub

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 11:28 PM

I have several Kodak Hobby Packs for E-6. How long would be the normal shelf life of them be ? They have always been stored in my house closet. Thanks. *BW*

#30 Nebhunter

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 12:00 AM

If the closet is cool and dry - then somewhere around the expiry date printed on the package for maximum colour density. After that I would say the density would start to slowly drop.

Keep it in the fridge and it will last longer. Keep it in the freezer - indefinitely - but in a good plastic container and away from the walls of the freezer where ice can form.

Also, great to see another possible film shooter, and welcome.

Igor

#31 pbunn

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 08:10 PM

I have a Jobo system in storage with multiple tanks and bottles. It worked fine when it was packed away a couple of years ago. I'd let it go very reasonable to someone who can use it.

#32 Nightfly

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 08:19 PM

I've been offered one recently and will be going that route, but there are a few folks here that might like your offer.

What do you say guys, any one interested? If no one bites I might have to!

PM me pbunn with what you'd like for it and if no one bites, I'll think it over.

Thanks

Jim

#33 Rick Thurmond

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:12 PM

These are great systems. I've had a CPP-2 for the whole time I've been interested in photography. I have used it for developing film (E-6, C41 and b/w). I no longer use it for color film but I still use it for my black and white film. I used it for all of my Ilfochrome prints and now that Ilfochrome is gone I use it for RA-4 and b/w prints. No complaints, though I've worn out a few parts from heavy use.
Rick

#34 Dave Kodama

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 09:21 AM

One of these days I'll probably break down and get one. :) Thus far, I've just been using your basic stainless steel tanks or open trays.

What I am really interested in, however, is if anyone has a solution for doing developing "in the field" (at my observatory) where I have limited running water. I have a 5-gallon tank that I can fill with water and use for a run, but don't want to go bigger than that. That means a tank that takes minimal chemicals and washing system that doesn't require Lake Michigan to wash the film. And I probably need to transport the waste back home with me...

And related to that -- can anyone advise the best way to process extremely small quantities of loose film (like single frame medium format "chips") in a light-sealed tank? These chips can be very curly (especially hypered Tech Pan). I've been doing those in open trays, but this is so inconvenient, it has been causing me to avoid shooting with my Schmidt camera.

Dave

#35 SteveNH

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 02:25 AM

Greetings, Dave!

These Film Astrophotography threads are so intriguing that I just had to pipe in (if you are still there!). I am the former owner of a custom color lab in California called Peninsula Photographics. We used to process E-6 and C-41 using dip-and dunk Hostert and Refrema machines, and had a 3-1/2 gallon sink line for custom black and white. I closed the lab in 2004, after 22 years in the business, so hearing of these films and processes hit a nostalgic cord in me!

To address your question, the E-6 process has one single all-important critical step that pretty much determines the consistency and fidelity of the processed image. That step is the first developer. Do this right and you'll be forgiven for temperature variations of +/- 2 degrees F for the rest of the steps - in fact, once you're past the color developer, you can even do the rest of the process at room temperature if you had to (though not recommended)! The first developer must be fresh, and temperature controlled to +/- 1/4 degree F. Agitation must be extremely consistent, and the process timed to a few seconds if possible, as you start the water rinse cycle. The rest of the steps can be done in more relaxed conditions, as long as temperature is kept within reasonable limits, e.g. between 80 to 90F. (It is preferable to keep the first wash and reversal bath close to 100F if possible.)

You will need to take two 5 gallon tanks or bottles of water with you. One for processing and the other for a tempering bath and temperature control. Back in the days before I opened my custom lab, I ran a photo lab for a scientific research center that always had insufficient funding. Therefore we had no automatic temperature control device, so I had to use a manually controlled hot water bath to do my color processing. Water has lots of thermal inertia, so once you get the bath temperature right, it can be controlled within tolerance for the duration of the critical first developer step by strategic additions of very hot water. The bath tank must be large enough to submerse all your chemistry bottles and your 16 oz. developing tank. You’ll need a simmering pot of hot water on a portable butane cooker so you can add scoops of it into the water bath while stirring, as necessary to keep the temperature at 100.5F for the duration of the first developer step, which for non push/pull is 6 minutes. After that, you’re home free! For washes, you can save quite a bit of water by filling and emptying the tank at 1 or 2 minute intervals, with agitation, about 5 or ten times – you do not need running water.

To develop the film chips, I would recommend using plastic 120 reels. Find one that is precisely made and does not buckle film, and yet is not so loose that the film rattles. Carefully and slowly slide your chip almost but not quite into the center of the reel, pinching the reel lightly with your thumb and index finger where the leading edge of the film passes each crossbar. It will help greatly if you trim off the leading corners of the film chip at an angle to bevel it. Just make sure the reels are absolutely dry before loading! You probably already know this from experience, but the base side is relatively immune to fingerprints, whereas great care must be used to avoid touching the emulsion. If your fingers are dry, no harm is done if you do touch the emulsion constantly moving across it, but once your finger stops in one position – that’s when damage occurs. You must make sure you fill the tank completely with chemistry to assure that agitation will not create currents that can dislodge the film chip. You would of course want to do a dry run with exposed film and water to see how it works.

Have fun!
Steve

#36 Dave Kodama

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 10:17 AM

Steve,

Yes, I'm still "here." Thanks for all your detailed information. Those tips sound very helpful. Although it sounds impractical for me to do this at my observatory where I don't have running water (or drains), I may still attempt color processing at home.

With the apparently imminent demise of Kodak, do you know if there is any practical alternative to Kodak chemistry? I've never seen any Fuji chemicals for sale. I have heard of other smaller (European?) companies, but never actually seen it for sale at the photo stores I go to.

Perhaps at my observatory I'll stick to at most black and white processing.

Dave

#37 Giorgos

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 11:37 AM

Try tetenal chemicals...

#38 SteveNH

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 12:04 PM

Dave,

In the commercial market a few years back, Fuji-Hunt chemistry was the most prominent competitor to Kodak. I don't know the details of the connection with Hunt, but I think nowadays the chemistry is distributed from the Fujifilm company itself. It was always much cheaper than Kodak, and they tried hard to pull us over to their account, but the quality, although good, was inconsistent at the time, and I couldn't afford to deal with that issue so I never strayed from Kodak. Recently though, Fuji has become the leader in supplying photo labs with high quality consistent chemistry and control strips, no different from the way Kodak used to be. But I don't know if they market smaller portions for individual use, nor do I know if they still make E-6 chemistry. In fact, I was surprised that these threads were still active to this current year! I would contact a Fuji rep to find out details of availability and distribution.

You're right - black and white would be a piece of cake at your observatory! :ubetcha:

Steve

#39 Dave Kodama

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 01:29 PM

Thanks everyone. I'll check out Tetenal. I've heard of them but not tried it (or seen it on local shelves).

Regarding Fuji, my local photo place (Pro Photo in Irvine, CA) still processes film, and it sounded like Fuji was very aggressive in making sure they stayed in the business of doing processing, providing equipment at low cost, etc.

Dave

#40 KB2QQM

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 01:13 AM

Hi,

I am new to the Astro section and just getting back into astronomy after a bit of a lapse.

I buy all my film and stuff from:

digitaltruth.com

and my favorite:

freestylephoto.biz

I liked "Kona's" setup. That's what I use at home too. fish tank thermometer and it always turns out great. Although I am more of a B&W film guy.

You can get E6 chemicals from freestyle. It comes in the pint, quart or gallon sizes. I got the quart size and it was $33.00 which they indicate will do 10 rolls of Medium Format film. I have 8 more rolls to do.
The E6 kit is from Arista. It works great. A premix of 3 chemicals. I am happy with the results.

I have also been making my own B&W developer: PaRodinal
out of Acetaminophen tablets, Drain cleaner (Lye) and Sodium Sulfite from PhotographersFormulary.com

cheers

Greg

#41 Nebhunter

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 01:37 AM

Welcome Greg and let us know how that home brewed astro film turns out. You may want to experiment with various exposures and push processing as well depending upon the target.

igor

#42 Glen A W

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 05:15 PM

I used to develop E6 using Kodak hobby-pack chemicals back when I was a kid. Looking at the slides now, they all still look great except one batch which has turned almost clear. I enjoyed processing the film and it seemed easy. I hope to try it again sometime soon. GW

#43 Nebhunter

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 04:56 PM

Getting chemicals is becoming an issue. The Arista looks to be doing a good job with less processing involved. I hope to try it soon.

#44 gillmj24

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 02:35 AM

Bump wish I found this thread a long time ago!

I've gotten into film the last year and developed my own e6 in a jobo processor. I found Kodak single use chemistry from about 2009 on ebay and after a test roll of 120 ektachrome that expired over 20 years ago - still a usable result- I developed my fresh 4x5 Fuji slides and they came out very nicely. The jobo makes everything manumatic but it was still a day's worth of activity to mix the chems and set everything up the first time and then clean up the kitchen afterward.

I have a sinar C 4x5 and a mamiya 645 and rz67. I'm late to the game having gone to film for the sensor size of the larger formats as my digital is 35mm format already. Bought an Epson film scanner but haven't used it yet.

I know Pentax 67 was a standard mount for astronomy as astro-physics' field flattener selection would indicate. Can you adapt that to the mamiya mount I wonder.

#45 TxStars

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 12:35 PM

You might be able to use the AP reducer with the proper spacing.
You would want to measure the Pentax body and make an adapter that makes the spacing the same with the Mamiya.

#46 keithlt

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 02:41 PM

e-6 film was so much fun for a/p and home development,i used to push the ASA over 10000 chemically buy adding time in the 1st chemical.ok so i just found a color side i took in 1982 of my chemicals and a 20x32 poaster blowup of m-42 done hand guided through a 6" newtonion and pentax s1a.it funny because i just cleaned up the telescope and mount last week.i cant wait to order new equipment and start all over.(this time goto and dslr)

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#47 searching4

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 11:43 PM

Hi. Go to Freestyle.com. They are in Hollywood Ca. They have all the supplies you will need. Just found an unopened box of E-6... going to have to get some slide film. It's really easy with the Arista chems. 60 sec pre wash, 6.5 min. for the 1st dev., 4.5 min for the color dev.,1st wash 2 min., blix 10 min final wash 5 min. About a half hour. Hope this helped

#48 Achernar

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 07:00 PM

Whatever kind of developing tank and reels you choose, practice loading the reels with a junk roll of film first. It is very important to load the reels correctly, otherwise your film will be damaged because of it contacting itself or the film getting marked up by improper handling. Practice until you can do it in total darkness. Most films must be developed in total darkness because they respond to the entire visible spectrum, and you must also make sure the room where you are loading the reels is completely blacked out to avoid ruining your film. Alternatively, you can use a "changing bag" which is a light proof bag with sleeves. You unzip the bag, insert the film, reels, tank, lid, scissors and something to open the cassettes with.

I developed my own film when I was a young man, and I preferred stainless steel tanks and reels. Once I loaded the reels, put them in the tank and put the lid on, I could then turn on the room lights and pour the pre-wet, first developer, reversal bath, and bleach fix into and out of the tank without fogging the film. Once the bleach-fix step was completed, I took the reels out and washed the film in my film washer before treating the film in a stabilizer solution.

Taras

#49 TxStars

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 07:40 PM

Don't forget, Cotton/latex gloves are your friend.
A finger print will show up on the film when developed.

#50 Nebhunter

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 07:59 PM

Have fun with the developing. I would love to have a Jobo unit. Don't know about making an adapter - probably less expensive just to get a good P67 camera?? Is it the Epson V600? If you get the Silverfast V8 software for it, you will get much better scans - MUCH better.

Igor






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