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Crow Haven Observatory - a small nested ROR design

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#476 Crow Haven

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 01:03 PM

...and a continued view a bit further to the obs...

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#477 Bart

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 02:06 PM

Maya,

It's been a while now since you had the observatory built. If you had to do it all over, and with what you now know, what would you have done differently?

Thanks
Bart

#478 Crow Haven

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 04:15 PM

Hi Bart, :grin:
The observatory design has proved itself to be perfect in every way! :grin: It has weathered hurricane-force winds and rain with no hiccups, and if we were to have heavy snow the build is solid and sturdy enough to hold the weight.

There isn't anything I would want done differently! It was built to conform with the building size restrictions and, if it weren't for those, the only thing that could be done with this would be to build an even bigger observatory and add extra piers simply because I have many different types of scopes.....but.....with the outside electrical connections, etc., it is more than easy to also setup outside the observatory with a large dob for example, or put in other pier pads. The observatory has tons of storage space and the heated warm-room and dehumidifier I consider a 'must-have.' :grin:
---Maya

#479 FTLAUDSKY

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 05:17 PM

wow..impressive!! Maybe one day I can have an observatory. In the meantime I am trying to get a pier setup in the yard and that isn't even going over well....one can dream...Thank you for this thread. Gave me inspiration for sure...

#480 Crow Haven

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 01:59 PM

:grin: Thank you for the reply! I'm glad it provided inspiration. :grin: I hope you get your yard pier working.
I may eventually add an outside pier setup to use in the warm months with other scopes. I don't want to add a lot of concrete ground, though, since it radiates heat, so I'm going with mostly lawn around the observatory.
Clear Skies! :grin:

#481 SkyCruzr

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Posted 01 March 2015 - 09:38 AM

Just finished spending a few hours reading this entire thread.  WOW!!  Having been in the construction / remodeling industry for more than 30 years,all I can say is.......Outstanding!!   You guys thought this one all the way through before moving the first shovel of dirt and it shows with all of the little details you incorporated into your project. Good job! :waytogo:


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#482 JJK

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Posted 01 March 2015 - 11:07 AM

Outside view of the OSB installed. :jump:
After the siding is up the next stage is roof framing, and since we have to wait a few days for the fixed wheeled casters to arrive we'll start on the non-moving roof section first. :grin:

 

Is that OSB2.0 or 3.0?   :grin:


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#483 TCW

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Posted 01 March 2015 - 04:12 PM

Very nicely built!

 

I am glad to see this thread resurrected as I missed out on it the first time around.   Your design has definitely given me food for thought.  I am glad to see you designed and built your retaining wall properly.  A local contractor built a wall of blocks similar to yours but about 40 feet high.  The first time I saw it I knew it would fail which it started to almost immediately.  It took about 10 years for it to fail completely and as a result the owner had to tear down a building in order to slope the soil properly.  :(

 

I too have lots of trees and until I work up the will to cut down dozens of mature pines, oaks and cedars I will have to hold off on building a observatory.  Are those Douglas Fir I see in the background?


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#484 Crow Haven

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 01:47 PM

Very nicely built!

 

I am glad to see this thread resurrected as I missed out on it the first time around.   Your design has definitely given me food for thought.  I am glad to see you designed and built your retaining wall properly.  A local contractor built a wall of blocks similar to yours but about 40 feet high.  The first time I saw it I knew it would fail which it started to almost immediately.  It took about 10 years for it to fail completely and as a result the owner had to tear down a building in order to slope the soil properly.  :(

 

I too have lots of trees and until I work up the will to cut down dozens of mature pines, oaks and cedars I will have to hold off on building a observatory.  Are those Douglas Fir I see in the background?

I'm glad you enjoyed this thread! :)  Yes, the cottage brick needs to not be stacked too high.  It's great, though, and we haven't had any problems with it nor the observatory.  The observatory has made it through the worst of weather here (over 70mph wind and rain storms) without any troubles.  Since we never get the huge loads of snow here that isn't a factor for this design either.

 

We've continued to cut those trees (mainly Douglas firs and some cedars -- yes that's what is in the photo backgrounds) that were diseased or dead and the underbrush much further up the hill behind the observatory.  There are a few trees in the way of my views to the west but the seasons roll all the objects into view anyway so that's not a problem. :)



#485 Crow Haven

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 01:52 PM

Just finished spending a few hours reading this entire thread.  WOW!!  Having been in the construction / remodeling industry for more than 30 years,all I can say is.......Outstanding!!   You guys thought this one all the way through before moving the first shovel of dirt and it shows with all of the little details you incorporated into your project. Good job! :waytogo:

Many thanks and I'm glad you enjoyed the thread! :)

 

 

Outside view of the OSB installed. :jump:
After the siding is up the next stage is roof framing, and since we have to wait a few days for the fixed wheeled casters to arrive we'll start on the non-moving roof section first. :grin:

 

Is that OSB2.0 or 3.0?   :grin:

:lol: I'll have to ask my designer...but it wasn't the cheap stuff I can tell you. :lol:

Update -- that's OSB3 (best used in our humid conditions) :)


Edited by Crow Haven, 02 March 2015 - 03:05 PM.


#486 JJK

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 04:48 PM

 

Just finished spending a few hours reading this entire thread.  WOW!!  Having been in the construction / remodeling industry for more than 30 years,all I can say is.......Outstanding!!   You guys thought this one all the way through before moving the first shovel of dirt and it shows with all of the little details you incorporated into your project. Good job! :waytogo:

Many thanks and I'm glad you enjoyed the thread! :)

 

 

Outside view of the OSB installed. :jump:
After the siding is up the next stage is roof framing, and since we have to wait a few days for the fixed wheeled casters to arrive we'll start on the non-moving roof section first. :grin:

 

Is that OSB2.0 or 3.0?   :grin:

:lol: I'll have to ask my designer...but it wasn't the cheap stuff I can tell you. :lol:

Update -- that's OSB3 (best used in our humid conditions) :)

 

 

And it's faster.



#487 TCW

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 08:53 PM

 

Very nicely built!

 

I am glad to see this thread resurrected as I missed out on it the first time around.   Your design has definitely given me food for thought.  I am glad to see you designed and built your retaining wall properly.  A local contractor built a wall of blocks similar to yours but about 40 feet high.  The first time I saw it I knew it would fail which it started to almost immediately.  It took about 10 years for it to fail completely and as a result the owner had to tear down a building in order to slope the soil properly.  :(

 

I too have lots of trees and until I work up the will to cut down dozens of mature pines, oaks and cedars I will have to hold off on building a observatory.  Are those Douglas Fir I see in the background?

I'm glad you enjoyed this thread! :)  Yes, the cottage brick needs to not be stacked too high.  It's great, though, and we haven't had any problems with it nor the observatory.  The observatory has made it through the worst of weather here (over 70mph wind and rain storms) without any troubles.  Since we never get the huge loads of snow here that isn't a factor for this design either.

 

We've continued to cut those trees (mainly Douglas firs and some cedars -- yes that's what is in the photo backgrounds) that were diseased or dead and the underbrush much further up the hill behind the observatory.  There are a few trees in the way of my views to the west but the seasons roll all the objects into view anyway so that's not a problem. :)

 

DF's are my favorite tree and I am fortunate to have a few myself.



#488 Crow Haven

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 12:21 PM

 

 

Just finished spending a few hours reading this entire thread.  WOW!!  Having been in the construction / remodeling industry for more than 30 years,all I can say is.......Outstanding!!   You guys thought this one all the way through before moving the first shovel of dirt and it shows with all of the little details you incorporated into your project. Good job! :waytogo:

Many thanks and I'm glad you enjoyed the thread! :)

 

 

Outside view of the OSB installed. :jump:
After the siding is up the next stage is roof framing, and since we have to wait a few days for the fixed wheeled casters to arrive we'll start on the non-moving roof section first. :grin:

 

Is that OSB2.0 or 3.0?   :grin:

:lol: I'll have to ask my designer...but it wasn't the cheap stuff I can tell you. :lol:

Update -- that's OSB3 (best used in our humid conditions) :)

 

 

And it's faster.

 

Agreed!  

 

 

 

Very nicely built!

 

I am glad to see this thread resurrected as I missed out on it the first time around.   Your design has definitely given me food for thought.  I am glad to see you designed and built your retaining wall properly.  A local contractor built a wall of blocks similar to yours but about 40 feet high.  The first time I saw it I knew it would fail which it started to almost immediately.  It took about 10 years for it to fail completely and as a result the owner had to tear down a building in order to slope the soil properly.  :(

 

I too have lots of trees and until I work up the will to cut down dozens of mature pines, oaks and cedars I will have to hold off on building a observatory.  Are those Douglas Fir I see in the background?

 

 

DF's are my favorite tree and I am fortunate to have a few myself.

 

They are beautiful trees! 




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