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Tele Optic Giro 2 Maintenance

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#1 MeadeMan

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 05:43 PM

Hello all

Does anyone know if the Giro 2 Mount by Tele optic ever requires servicing?

By this, I mean, does the mount require re-greasing from time to time and if so, what is the grease that should be used?

Regards

Mike G

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#2 Jim7728

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 08:52 PM

Maybe contact tele-optic?

http://www.tele-opti...ID_4990031.html

#3 Traveler

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Posted 01 August 2009 - 05:50 AM

Ever is a long time by the way....

No, in my case the Giro is still after several years in splendid condition. Why you are asking, are you having trouble with the mount?

#4 PJF

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Posted 01 August 2009 - 05:05 PM

Can’t say if they all “require” servicing; but I can say that my particular unit benefited enormously from a strip down and re-lube.

I bought mine second hand, and for a couple of months I thought I’d bought a pup. Neither axis was particularly smooth; indeed both felt distinctly rough sometimes if balance was off even slightly. From limited previous experience of one of these mounts I knew this wasn’t correct.

Eventually, since the mount was causing more aggravation than satisfaction, I felt a “kill or cure” remedy was in order. So apart it all came. I wasn’t entirely surprised to see the grease looking old, thin and dry, similar to the appearance of that in neglected bearings on cars, etc. Since this was a radical rescue (and having had previous success with Teflon loaded grease in other low temperature bearings), I went for the most Teflon loaded grease I could find in the regular retail sector:
http://www.finishlin...fied-grease.htm
(available at Halfords in the UK)
The application method I used was the good old “absolutely loads and then keep wiping the excess off the joins until the excess stops appearing” default classic.

The result was delightful; both axes free, smooth and easy with perfect, almost imperceptible stiction. No need for endless, neurotic balancing anymore to achieve gratifyingly gliding motions up and down and around and about. The friction-locking bolts deliver appropriate feedback “feel” - instead of being all or juddering uncertainty.

It was so successful, in fact, that I applied the same approach to the alt-az mounts on both my AstroSystems (1980s UK Rob Miller) Newtonian ‘scopes to similar benefit.

Sorry, I can’t tell you if other greases work as well, or how long this lasts. I know this worked brilliantly so I apply it at the start of every observing season (hey, it’s August already) and just enjoy worry-free alt-az viewing without distraction.

Top kudos to “Oldfield OS” and his/her adviser for the page on how to dismantle the Giro II:
http://www.astromart...p?article_id=72


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#5 MeadeMan

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 06:16 PM

Guys

Thank you very much for all the information you have all provided on this topic.

My mount is brand new and was supplied in fact as a Bressier mount with tripod, the tripod being replaced by a Berlebach UNI 18. One night after I had removed the scopes from the mount, I lifted the tripod and mount by picking the whole assembly up from the Giro Mount Arms.....this caused the main head of the mount to lift from the base which was still firmly attached to the tripod mounting plate.
Although there was no damage at all to anything, I noticed the Giro mount was simply a greased bearing sliding on two machined surfaces.....this is why I wondered whether or not, in time, the unit would reqiure a strip down and rebuild in case the grease dried out.
The unit is flawless in its operation and I am very pleased to say the least....such smooth, effortless, wobble free images even at high powers with a 127mm refractor and 2x barlow. My only complaint is that the Alt Brake doesn't really do anything which is a nuicance when changing my heavy Meade UWA eyepieces out, as I have to steady the long 127mm to prevent it tipping, or, allow it to rotate to a vertical position and then rebalance. I am thinking the nylon lug in the alt hole has become contaminated with grease where it is supposed to bite on the arms inside the unit?
Even so, I've learnt alot from all your helpful comments and links you have provided and will print this thread as a source of refernece for the mount.
I intend to purchase a case for it to store it in when not in use, and incidently, I've recently seen a picture of the Giro 2 mount with machined aluminium brake knobs as oposed to the supplied plastic ones. It was pictured with the new Explore Scientific 80mm APO in a publicity shot I believe.

Once again many thanks

:)

#6 Jim7728

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 08:18 PM

I lifted the tripod and mount by picking the whole assembly up from the Giro Mount Arms.....this caused the main head of the mount to lift from the base which was still firmly attached to the tripod mounting plate.



Did the same to my GIRO3. No harm done, but there could have been a instructional warning not to lift it by the top part when attached to tripod. My "3" version has teflon type bearings.

I've recently seen a picture of the Giro 2 mount with machined aluminium brake knobs as oposed to the supplied plastic ones. It was pictured with the new Explore Scientific 80mm APO in a publicity shot I believe.



That's ES's Twilight alt/az. Looks like a Giro, but believe it's Chinese sourced product. Thought the one I saw at NEAF was quite smooth.

http://explorescient...s/ed_80_apo.jpg

#7 PJF

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 04:00 PM

...I lifted the tripod and mount by picking the whole assembly up from the Giro Mount Arms.....this caused the main head of the mount to lift from the base which was still firmly attached to the tripod mounting plate.


Heh, looks like they may have gone from one extreme to the other with these mounts - from an inability to remove the azimuth column (straightforwardly) from the base, to leaving it unsecured. I wonder if the latter is a response to user feedback on the former.






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