Jump to content


Photo

Meade 2120 - LX3

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
3 replies to this topic

#1 Pauls72

Pauls72

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 626
  • Joined: 28 Oct 2007

Posted 05 August 2009 - 01:55 PM

Our club has an old 10" Meade 2120 with LX3 drive on a Meade wedge. It has been stored in someones barn for at least 4 years that we know of. I am in the process of restoring it. The optics have cleaned up pretty well and the clock drive works. However this monster is super sensitive to any motion or wind and then takes forever to dampen out. All the screws, bolts, knobs, etc... are tight but is just seems like the fork, the mount and the wedge all have some flexture in them. Are there any know problems, fixes or suggestions of things to look at.

Thanks,
Paul

Posted Image
Posted Image

#2 rmollise

rmollise

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15778
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2007

Posted 05 August 2009 - 05:43 PM

Our club has an old 10" Meade 2120 with LX3 drive on a Meade wedge. It has been stored in someones barn for at least 4 years that we know of. I am in the process of restoring it. The optics have cleaned up pretty well and the clock drive works. However this monster is super sensitive to any motion or wind and then takes forever to dampen out. All the screws, bolts, knobs, etc... are tight but is just seems like the fork, the mount and the wedge all have some flexture in them. Are there any know problems, fixes or suggestions of things to look at.


It will never be the Rock of Gibraltar, but a set of Celestron's vibration supression pads will help a lot.

Riggin' up a real tripod leg spreader that presses against the legs can help too.

#3 Joe Aguiar

Joe Aguiar

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2145
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2007

Posted 05 August 2009 - 05:57 PM

I had the same scope a 10" Meade LX6 it had the same fork arms & tripod & legs. Thats about as good as it going to get, try keeping the tripod legs as low as posible & yep the vibration pads do helps but i found it to be pretty stable for visual work if you are on solid ground.

It severed me well for about 12 years.

Joe

#4 Pauls72

Pauls72

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 626
  • Joined: 28 Oct 2007

Posted 06 August 2009 - 11:42 PM

Thanks Guys,
I'll try both suggestions. I made a spreader for my LXD55 and it helped a bunch. I have kept the legs all the way down. The other night our club had a sidewalk astronomy session at the local Walmart, so it was on the concrete in front of the store, still way too much movement.

Guess I'm just spoiled ever since I got my Atlas EQ-G, it is like the Rock of Gibraltar.






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics