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LPI and Autoguiding

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#1 JR#8

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 06:55 AM

-Right know I dont have any cash to buy a real auto guider. I was wondering if I would be able to use a LPI on a ED80 to guide the LX200 10".

#2 rmollise

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 09:00 AM

-Right know I dont have any cash to buy a real auto guider. I was wondering if I would be able to use a LPI on a ED80 to guide the LX200 10".


You would. After a fashion, anyhow. The problem is that it is rather insensitive, meaning relatively long exposures and relatively bright guidestars will be needed. With a good drift alignment and a precisely balanced scope, you might be able to make a go of it...and it would, if nothing else, get your feet wet with autoguiding.

#3 mattyfatz

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 01:25 PM

Great Question....
Uncle Rod, Would it be better to use the Meade DSI as an autoguider, rather than the LPI?
Matty

#4 JR#8

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 05:29 AM

Is it that much of a pain in the but to get this auto guiding thing.

#5 neptun2

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 05:35 AM

Meade DSI is more sensitive then LPI so definitely DSI looks like better choice for autoguide.

#6 Charlie Hein

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 05:40 AM

The DSI would definitely make a far better autoguider than the LPI will. However, if the OP is asking because he already owns the LPI and is looking to get going on the cheap then Uncle Rod's advice is spot on.

#7 rmollise

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 06:44 AM

Great Question....
Uncle Rod, Would it be better to use the Meade DSI as an autoguider, rather than the LPI?
Matty


Very much so. That's what I use all the time. Much more sensitive.

#8 rmollise

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 06:44 AM

Is it that much of a pain in the but to get this auto guiding thing.


Uhhhh.... :confused:

#9 JR#8

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 09:56 PM

t

With a good drift alignment and a precisely balanced scope, you might be able to make a go of it...and it would, if nothing else, get your feet wet with autoguiding.

Since I'm new to this guiding thing. Why would one have to do a drift alignment if the computer and scope are doing the guiding for you

#10 rmollise

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 07:53 AM

t

With a good drift alignment and a precisely balanced scope, you might be able to make a go of it...and it would, if nothing else, get your feet wet with autoguiding.

Since I'm new to this guiding thing. Why would one have to do a drift alignment if the computer and scope are doing the guiding for you


The closer you get to the pole, the better your results will be. Certainly, I've had very good luck at reasonably short f/ls (800mm or so and down) and reasonably short subframes (3-minutes or so) despite skipping a drift alignment. But a good polar alignment does make things go easier.

#11 Jimmy2K63

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 10:29 PM

In supplement to what Rod said, nothing substitutes for accurate polar alignment because if you are spot on, all your corrections are on one axis only (RA) and you won't have any field rotation in the final image. The longer the focal length the more you amplify that visually.






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