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Cabeus Crater Impact Pastel Impression [Observed?]

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#1 markseibold

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 08:03 PM

Posted Image

Well as there was an Impact Star Party provided by the generosity of Dan Gray and his phenomenal home built 28 inch String Telescope at the inner city location of Portland Oregon on the Willamette River with a high resolution video feed and digital recording, just in case I could not see the event through my 10.i inch Dobsonian, I had to stay up till 3:30 AM PDT and go.

We thought we saw the event but perhaps we were viewing the wrong crater as Dan’s video monitor showed what looked like a bright plume with shadowed side; I confirmed seeing it in my 10 inch Dobsonian as others did. It seemed to last for many minutes.

Then someone looked up a NASA site to check the crater images for reference. We were looking to the west of Cabeus, another adjacent crater but could swear there was a three dimensional plume translucent with a shadowed side. I did a quick field sketch over the earlier sketch I made from the NASA site photos earlier at the home computer. Then worked up this later large 19 X 25” pastel on black Strathmore Artagain pastel paper to indicate in detail what I observed through the eyepiece of my 10 inch Dobsonian and Dan’s video monitor simultaneously as I ran repeatedly between both views. *Other reference photos are linked within this post below.

Mark
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My CN Gallery

CabeusImpactFieldStudySketch >
http://i10.photobuck...dSketchStud.jpg

Impact At Cabeus Photo Through 10 Inch Dobsonian with Sony Cybershot mounted over eyepiece projection with 9.7mm plossl *Note red pointer where Cabeus is, *Blue arrow denoted where we observed plume, a crude image through a Sony Cybershot that I used barely shows the grey cone shaped plume just at bottom of blue arrow >

http://i10.photobuck...rough10Inch.jpg

Moon through 10 inch Dobsonian 32mm plossl eyepiece projection to Sony Cybershot Camera

http://i10.photobuck...rough10Inch.jpg

Dan Gray’s Impact Star Party at TMS – 28 inch String Telescope, other RCA members

http://i10.photobuck...rPartyTMS28.jpg



#2 CarlosEH

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 11:34 PM

Mark,

Excellent lunar disk observation and artist impression of the LCROSS impact event. Thank you for sharing them with us all.

I am glad that you and your friends were able to get together for the LCROSS impact event. It appears that you had the aperture sizes required to view this event. The last that I heard is that an event (plume) was not visualized using the Palomar (200-inch) or the mighty Keck (10-meter), although they could have obtained data in the infrared. I am not doubting that you and your companions witnessed something, but whether it was the actual impact is uncertain (as of this time). I look forward to other observations of the impact event as well.

The best of luck in your future observations.

Carlos

#3 Jef De Wit

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 03:28 AM

Mark, thanks for the the nice sketch! Finally I saw "something" of the impact. At 11.30 UT it was in Belgium broad daylight and the Moon was only 5° high in the sky :bawling:.
So I looked at NASA TV, but there was nothing to see! In the last close ups from Cabeus I saw the head of a frog (Kermit?). The broadcast looked very amateur to me. The people in the controlroom didn't look very happy. I think the expected some visual result.
In the morning (8.00 UT) - when the Moon was still high in the sky - I looked to the impact zone with my 12" dobson. It was my first observation of the Moon in daylight. With my Field Map of the Moon (Sky&Telescope) I hopped from Clavius to Moretus, Short and Newton. But after that it went a little bit difficult at the limb. I couldn't identify Cabeus. The maximum magnification was only x100, due to bad seeing.
Hopefully the scientific results are better....

#4 CarlosEH

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 09:26 AM

Mark,

I believe that you and your friends may have seen something connected with the LCROSS impact event, but no confirmation by the larger observatories to date. I found the following links with regards to observations made by the Keck (10-meter) reflector and the Palomar (200-inch using adaptive optics, very impressive!). I hope to see confirmation of some activity connected with the impact soon. Thank you once again for sharing your observations and experience with us all.

Jef- I also believe that you saw a phenomena (?) associated with the impact event on the NASA TV image. Thank you for sharing your experience with us all.

Links;
http://darkerview.co...-From-Keck.html
http://www.astro.cal...mar/lcross.html

Carlos

#5 frank5817

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 10:05 AM

Mark,

I wish NASA TV would have used this sketch while it was telling us about the impact. Beautiful work as always.
:bow: :bow: :rainbow: :bow: :bow:

Frank :)

#6 gregj888

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 12:33 PM

Carlos,

I was one of the people there with Mark. I assure you, we did NOT see a plume. For a short while we thought we did, but it was an existing feature of the moon's surface:-)

Seeing was pretty bad... Here's what we were looking at (raw image, first attempt with the web cam, 6" f/15 trischiefspiegler at prime focus).

Greg

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#7 markseibold

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 03:53 PM

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Carlos, Jef, Frank and Greg

Thanks to all of you, glad that you enjoyed the art which I seem to understand now looks better than the real thing! (;

Carlos, thanks for the inspiration as you say that we [might] have viewed something of the LCROSS event. Although Greg indicates that we did not, I guess I am an optimist. Glad to see you here Greg as I did not think any other Rose City Astronomers ever frequented the Cloudy Nights Forums.

Frank- thanks for the kind commendations; Can you put a word into NASA for me? I was a little dismayed that Dr Tony Phillips at Spaceweather did not display my sketch as he has put my art up on his front page more than any other. I know I'd like to see art from others there but it just doesn't seem to happen. Where are all the artists? At least we have Cloudy Nights to thank.

I suppose Spaceweather determined it to be only art and not an actual observed event. I hope Carlos is right about a chance that it could have been related. Although Greg has a reasonably good image of what we saw, note mine above [and my image is reversed from Greg's], as taken through my 10 inch Dobsonian/Newtonian (23 years old and never colimated) with a consumer-grade Sony digital camera propped over the 9.7mm eyepiece.

Dan took a length of video footage through his 28 inch scope that showed this anomalous cone shaped plume. I hope to see Dan's video images put up here somewhere eventually.

I have placed a 'Blue Arrow' over the visual anomaly appearing as a cone shaped plume. The 'Red Arrow' is indicating where the Cabeus dark crater is. Not actually bad seeing, I would say Greg, at the moment I snapped this photo. What the live eye actually saw was much more telling than the photos, as we know as sketch artists, fleeting moments of 'seeing' come through. The photo artists now know this with video frames snapping away at many per second to later 'cherry-pick' the best of.

Jef- Glad that you finally saw 'something' [the art?], sorry you had to contend with daylight.

If I only serve to enrtertain the viewers eye with art, imagine the posssibilities. Sorry this was again a rough and unfinished work; I could have spent more time detailing the surface craters, but rather left things smooth, I think it looks more like a snow scene in winter; sorry to critique my own and suggest other images but there it is.

Mark
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Imagination is more important than knowledge -Albert Einstein

#8 markseibold

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 06:37 PM

As if enough was not said about this, perhaps this stereo vision camera record a friend took of me today indicating the pastel images will help. :question: :shrug: :yay:

*If you have never experienced the old Sawyers [GAF] Viewmaster images, here is your chance! You'll have to hold your eyes about 10 inches from the screen, relax the eyes and a stereo image will appear as a 3rd image with the two originals on either side. For astronomers, think averted vision to help. . . The more you do this and get it, the more the eyes learn how to do it next time... Enjoy,
Mark
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#9 frank5817

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 08:48 PM

Mark,

Works very well. Looks great in 3-D. Oohh. Wwaaiitt nnooww II''mm sseeiinngg eevveerryy tthhiinngg iinn ddoouubbllee..
:cool: :cool: :bow: :bow:

FFrraannkk :) :)

#10 JayKSC

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 08:40 AM

What an awe-inspiring illustration, Mark! I especially like how you've incorporated subtle warms and cools in your pastel work. It adds a depth and realism to the moon that captures a sense of what it is to directly observe our neighbor.

I look forward to more of your great pieces in the future!

- Jay
South Florida

#11 markseibold

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 04:44 AM

Frank

I know you are kidding, but many people write to me and admit that they cannot focus to see the stereo 3-D effect. I should have indicated the eyes to further back at about 10 inches and not only 4 or 5. Also as I explained to a lady friend the other day who could not focus to produce the effect, I asked that she focus on something across the room, hold that focus and then drop the eyese into the screen at the prescribed distance; try not to focus on the images directly but to stay centered and the 3rd image will eventually appear between the two as a 3-D. The eyes will feel slightly crossed but relaxed.

Good luck,

Mark

#12 frank5817

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 09:56 AM

Mark,

I have never had trouble doing these "cross eyed" stereo images but you certainly feel the pull in your extrensic eye muscles. It does help to be very relaxed. I do like these as much as the stereo red/blue glasses images but you can't have them as large.

Frank :)

#13 markseibold

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 02:48 AM

What an awe-inspiring illustration, Mark! I especially like how you've incorporated subtle warms and cools in your pastel work. It adds a depth and realism to the moon that captures a sense of what it is to directly observe our neighbor.

I look forward to more of your great pieces in the future!

- Jay
South Florida


Thanks Jay-

Glad you liked it. I really did try to illustrate what we thought we saw, if you look closely at Greg's photo and mine (his is in real image and mine is reversed as photographed directly through the Newtonian optics. It really did appear as a cone shaped plume in three dimension. It had us all fooled as we were looking at the wrong crater next door. Also the supposed plume appered to last for over 20 minutes. Is that possible? I know the gravity on the moon is only said to be 1/6th of the earth's. Did NASA hit the wrong crater next door? Others said we mistook a surface anomaly as a plume.

Mark






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