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The Great Peninsula and Adjacent Sea

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#1 frank5817

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 05:51 PM

On this cold early morning I chose for sketching the lunar highland region that is pointed directly to Earth, namely the Great Peninsula and the adjacent Mare Nubium. It would be much fun to draw the entire visible part of the Peninsula in just one sketching session at the eyepiece but that is just a dream with the terminator features changing so quickly. I focused on just what I could handle inside my self-imposed two hour limit. The seeing was good and that alone means ignoring some visible detail within the allotted time.
I was well into the sketch when I noticed my first mistake. I was using the excellent black Canson acid-free paper and one edge was embossed with the words “Colorline Canson…” which I discovered about one hour into the sketch as I began drawing over these words… Dah.
The terminator was cutting across the western part of the peninsula which was diagonal and inverted in the eyepiece from upper right to lower left in the Newtonian telescope.
From top center to lower left the large ancient craters with floors in full darkness are: Regiomontanus (125km.) with an illuminated, cratered peak somewhat off center; Purbach (120km.) with its arching central peaks picking up the last rays of sunlight; Smaller Thebit (60km.) closest to Rupes Recta (Straight Wall); Arzachel (100km.) with all but the rim in total darkness (note: that was not the case before I started sketching); and lastly Alpetragius( 40km.) with the tip of its huge central peak catching light.
The two smallish and younger craters on the other side of Rupes Recta are Birt (17km.) and Nicollet (15km.). With such good seeing many smaller craters were clearly visible across the Sea of Clouds. While observing this region after finishing the sketch in twilight, clouds moved in and closed out any further viewing.
Sketching is always a series of compromises, if you want the moon high in the sky this time of year you are limited to the early morning. During the fall early morning is the coldest part of the day and you need to give up some sleep time.
It was an adrenalin rush to see the moon on this morning and enough to keep warm.

Sketching:

For this sketch I used: black Canson paper 9”x 13”, white and black Conte’
pastel pencils , and Conte’ crayons, a blending stump, plastic eraser.
Telescope: 10 inch f/ 5.7 Dobsonian with 6mm (241x) eyepiece
Date: 10-11-2009 9:30-11:30 UT
Temperature: -3°C (27°F)
Clear becoming mostly cloudy, calm
Seeing: Antoniadi II and briefly I
Co longitude 182°
Lunation 22.7 days
Illumination 49.4%

Oak Forest, Illinois

Frank McCabe :)

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#2 JanisR

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 09:17 PM

Terrific drawing, well worth the chill and loss of sleep!

I would have missed the imprint if you hadn't mentioned it. (Don't you just hate when that happens? For me, it usually happens just seconds after I think to myself "hmm, this drawing is looking pretty good..." :-)

#3 JayinUT

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 12:05 AM

Frank,

As always, you offer a wonderful view in your sketch and you gave a great description of the process.

#4 jayscheuerle

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 06:40 AM

Awesome! - j

#5 perfessor

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 07:17 AM

Frank, a great drawing as always. Wonderful texture in an attractive region.

#6 Jef De Wit

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 07:42 AM

Frank, impressive as allways.

#7 JayKSC

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 08:44 AM

Your drawing captures fantastic detail and depth, Frank. The contrast between the deep shadows encompassing the crater floors and the brightly lit peaks and crater rims is particularly stunning. I fully agree with your sentiment about sketching involving compromises, too. Such compromise is definitely worthwhile, though, to accomplish what you've shared here.

- Jay
South Florida

#8 frank5817

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 10:03 AM

Jan, Jay, Jay S, Tom, Jef and Jay K:

Thank you all for your kind words and comments. :thanx:
---
Jan, I was feeling pretty good about the sketch until I spotted the imprint-- live and learn.

People that don't sketch have no idea how much fun they are missing.

Frank :)

#9 Tom Machtemes

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 10:48 AM

Frank,

A very nice sketch :)

:thanx:,

Tom

#10 frank5817

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 03:55 PM

Tom,

Thank you. :thanx:
Keep your fingers crossed for the evening of October 23rd.

Frank :)

#11 Tommy5

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 08:47 PM

Great sketch great contrast between the shadows and lunar crators i saw the moon rise over Las Vegas this weekend great sight.

#12 frank5817

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 09:41 AM

Tommy5,

Thank you for your nice words. :thanx:
Wait--- I thought it was "What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" ? :shocked:

Frank :)

#13 kraterkid

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 10:08 AM

Frank, this sketch is nothing short of a masterpiece! :bow: :bow: :rainbow: :bow: :bow: From the shadow filled craters Regiomontanus, Purbach, Arzachel and Thebit to the ancient and degraded circular form of Ancient Thebit (Chuck Wood pointed out this out in one of his LPOD posts) to the wonderful sword of the Straight Wall. Magnificent work! :waytogo: BTW, It took me 15 minutes to locate the Canson embossment, so I'd say no problem! :D

#14 CarlosEH

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 10:55 AM

Frank,

An outstanding observation (sketch) and report of the Great Peninsula and adjacent Mare Nubium. You have captured this region perfectly. The rendering gives a chilly feeling as if we were all observing next to you (I could use some cool air as it is now 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 Celsius) down here in South Florida (Is it really the middle of October?). The shadows and the peaks (edges) of the craters are well rendered. Rupes Recta (Straight Wall) looks very nice as well. Thank you for sharing this with us all. I hope to look at the Moon soon myself.

Carlos

#15 Jef De Wit

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 11:59 AM

Frank, congratulation with your ASOD!

#16 frank5817

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 12:44 PM

Rich, Carlos and Jef,

Thank you all for the encouraging words and nice comments about this sketch.:thanx: I must say Rich I had the best view ever of this region and wish I could have seen it with the 18" scope.
---
Carlos , I would be happy to trade weather conditions with you for a while, I didn't get my fill of summer weather this year.
---
Jef, I'm always honored and happy when I see one of my sketches on ASOD but I happiest when I see sketches Rich and Jeremy post that are the creations of other sketchers from around the sky sketching world.
Thanks again guys.

Frank :)

#17 markseibold

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 05:21 AM

Frank

Beautiful artwork as always. :bow: :rainbow: :bow: :rainbow:

Your dedication to sketching the fine details and then extensively describing them is an inspiration to me for over the past year now as I'm sure it is to many others who frequent this forum.

Sorry, I have been so scattered lately and slow to respond for the past month while traveling.

Your mention of the stumbling over the Canson embossment is humbling as it sounds like something that happens to me often. I could write a book on my mistakes alone! :foreheadslap:

I always have to get out my astronomy moon charts and read along in your descriptiopns of the details that you catch.
Anyone having the privilege to observe with you would gain a treasure trove of observing skills on the moon. Have you ever considered doing a lunar observing/sketching class for a local university as an addendum to their astronomy classes? Students would learn so much from you.

I always look forward to seeing your next work,

Mark

#18 frank5817

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 01:54 PM

Mark,

Thank you for your kind comments.
Actually there are several regulars here and in the Lunar observing Forum that are very knowledgeable about all thing lunar. Also in the Lunar forum at the page top are some great works and book lists so folks can get up to speed. Look also at Lunar Photo of the Day website ( Chuck Wood's Site) where you can read back over the years all the daily posts.
At our monthly open viewing at the district's community college (weather permitting) we do observe the moon and most folks that attend do enjoy the views. I have done astronomy presentations at the college through the speakers bureau in years gone by. Attendance has been lower than you might think at a community college that is the second largest in Illinois at 17,000 students.
Even the Astronomy credit course has trouble filling one section with students.
I have lived in Chicagoland for 63 years and am hoping to relocate to better skies soon.

Frank :)






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