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New Solar Cycle Activity Sketches

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#1 Special Ed

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 08:46 PM

Hi Folks,

A break in the clouds covering WV for the past month allowed me to make these white light sketches of new Active Region 1029. Both drawings were done with a 2B pencil and stump on Strathmore recycled sketch paper.

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#2 Special Ed

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 08:47 PM

This is sketch #2 made 5 hours after the first sketch.

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#3 frank5817

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 09:13 PM

Michael,

Very nice sketches. :bow: :cool: :rainbow: You took good advantage of your opportunity. I was very surprised to see the sun yesterday and today although both were brief encounters. We are living in very cloudy times East of the Mississippi river.

Frank :)

#4 Tommy5

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 09:57 PM

Cool beans, it looks like the sunspots may be on the way back.

#5 markseibold

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 04:09 AM

Michael

Very nice sketch documentation of the current sunspots. :bow: :bow: :bow: It was clear all day Saturday in Portland and all I thought of was showing the moon to patrons at a local coffee house in the early evening. Then the clouds rolled in instead. Wished I'd seen your post. I guess part of this is the perservering to catch the ever changing dynamism in the moment. I need to check all celestial object postings in CN more often. Hopefullly we'll see clearing again here.

Thanks for posting; I'll look forward to your future observations and solar sketches.

Mark

#6 kraterkid

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 08:05 AM

Michael, very nice to see your superb White Light sketches of AR 1029. Does the nearly equatorial position of this active region indicate anything about future solar activity?

#7 Special Ed

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 11:15 AM

Thanks, everyone. It was nice to see a little sunshine, even though I had to steal the time. This AR is very active so anyone who has an Halpha scope like a PST will get some rewarding views (I didn't have time to get mine out yesterday).

Rich, I don't know the answer to your question. Usually, early activity is in the higher latitudes, but the Sun hasn't been acting like its usual self, so who knows?

#8 Special Ed

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 06:12 PM

Hi everyone,

I made this quick sketch at lunchtime today. The active region will rotate out of sight soon but is still quite visible. Same media as before.

I hope this sketch can give a sense of the stupendous size of the Sun.

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#9 CarlosEH

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 07:14 PM

Michael,

Excellent observations of the Sun in white light showing the sunspot group AR 1029. It is ironic that we get excited about seeing one or two sunspots so long after solar minimum. The sunspot group (AR 1029) is interesting. Thank you for sharing them with us all.

Carlos

#10 Special Ed

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 09:15 PM

Thanks, Carlos. Yes, it is all relative--this little bit of solar activity would hardly be worth a mention if it wasn't at the start of a long awaited new cycle. *And* it may be a long time before anymore activity as this minimum drags on.

Meanwhile, Luna delivers dependable and dynamic views as shown by your excellent drawing of Crater Copernicus. :bow:






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