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Moon- Light Shaft in Grimaldi Crater- New Photo

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#1 markseibold

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 08:25 AM

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Moon- Light Shaft in Grimaldi Crater- New Photo

This is yet another re-photographed earlier work. That of the light shaft observed in Grimaldi crater last February 2009 from Cannon Beach Oregon initially through my Celestron Nexstar 5i, then later continued at home through my 10.1” Newtonian.

This was another of those original large pastels on 22’ X 30” Stonehenge 100% cold pressed cotton fiber pastel paper, in fact the first on this paper that I produced with an artists conception landscape. It has subtle blues and browns in the dark shadows that did not show up in the original photo reproduction here in CN.

Also tonight my professional photographer friend photographed me with the art outside under the moonlight in two 30 second time exposures. It was difficult to hold a frozen pose for the time exposure; note the blurring in areas. Although it appears as under noon day sunlight it is under a high full moon overhead. That stereo image is possible if the cross-eyed technique is employed; also with the old-new-combined pastel images following.

-Mark
*For maximum viewing of this image a larger resolution image is at this address and may require clicking again to render 100% size >
Larger Image of 22" X 30" Pastel Sketch- Light Shaft in Grimaldi Crater

#2 markseibold

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 08:28 AM

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New image on left- Old image on right *A slight 3~D image is possible with the prescibed viewing technique if desired.

#3 markseibold

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 08:32 AM

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Mark and art photographed under full moonlight in two 30 second time exposures Nov 1 2009. *Note movement of artist causing blurred image durng 30 second time exposure.

#4 frank5817

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 11:33 PM

Mark,

This light shaft drawing from the lunar surface is really amazimg in 3-D. :cool: :bow: :rainbow:

Frank :)

#5 JayinUT

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 01:12 AM

On the comparison Mark, the new one is just so much more striking online. The contrast just blows me away and it brings more detail to the top sketch. Nicely done.

#6 markseibold

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 03:19 PM

Frank and Jay,

Thank you, I wasn't really sure that the improvement in the photograph shows through here after it is reduced for the size limitations in CN. Especially this particular work. I think it was more so the subtle colors that came through in the shadows but again, I am not sure that is showing through here depending on some computer screens.

I hope to do a new work soon as the weather improves here and not merely display old work, especially if these new images are not showing something meaningful.

Mark

#7 JayinUT

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 04:05 PM

Mark,

Have you tried an online storage place like photobucket? I get 500mb of storage and after several years (including photo's that I take as I am into photography somewhat for fun) I have only used 8% of the storage on my account. I mention it because you could link to the image and people could see it there though I'm not sure what the max. file size is.

I also have to say I just re-visited your Jupiter, Venus Moon conjunction from a year ago and really just enjoy that creation.

#8 Shannon s

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 04:25 PM

Beautiful as always Mark. Your a mad man, when do you find time to eat and sleep? I am curious as to what kind of pastels you use. I had an uncle that did fish and dear in pastels and I keep envisioning these square chunks of pastels with a paper around them,what a mess. Have they gotten high tec yet and made pastels in pencil form yet? :question:

#9 Shannon s

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 04:27 PM

DEER! OOPS.

#10 markseibold

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 06:01 PM

Beautiful as always Mark. Your a mad man, when do you find time to eat and sleep? I am curious as to what kind of pastels you use. I had an uncle that did fish and dear in pastels and I keep envisioning these square chunks of pastels with a paper around them,what a mess. Have they gotten high tec yet and made pastels in pencil form yet? :question:


OK Darling, watch your step! :roflmao:

Shannon- I am glad that you asked. Right now I am not going to go into one of my long story book responses but had hoped that you would have discovered about posting your photo of your Andromeda Galaxy painting. Did you figure out the Photoshop sizing? By the way, I still didn't get this post of the new photo of this artwork right. I am learning to color balance the photos after my friend re-photographs them. and then the real job; They are up to 30 ~ 50 MB in size! When I reduce them to only 100KB for CN i am losing some of the integrtity in image as it still looks soft-blurred and lacking something to me here even on my new large screen Toshiba laptop.

As for pastels, they are usually agreed in the history books as the most respected art medium in the world after oil painting because they use the same fine pigments as oils which render such vibrant color. However some schools of thought rate pastels as better than oil painting! Go to the web and look at the great impressionists, Edgar Degas works or Toulouse Lautrec. (Or many web sites with fine pastel artists working today.) This is because they have less chemical binders in them than oils yet the same fine color pigments. Oils can crack and peel from a canvas if improperly applied. Pastels will never do this although they are applied to mostly thin sheets of paper, they are vulnerable to moisture, (obviously cannot be left in a flooded basement where I live now!) :bawling: :help: :tonofbricks:

Go to any art store and look at the pastel selection. It is like being a kid in a candy store. Ask the workers to show them to you and explain their use. They are like anything in the world. You can buy a wrecked used VW Bug or you can buy a new Rolls Royce. They both get you from point A to Point B on the road but you know the difference?

Pastels can come as small bare various colored square sticks in lesser/cheaper pigment quality at maybe $1 per stick, conversely they come in paper and plastic wrapped larger round sticks from Holland, Germany, France, etc for up to $6 ~ $8 per stick but these are very fine pigments and some of the expensive brands are like semi-hard butter and blend like heaven (*But not to be confused with 'oil pastels' which are more like waxy crayons or Conte Crayons- An entirely different pastel form that I do not use). Complete sets can run several hundred dollars if you like. But mine are a collection starting from some old antique boxed sets that my mother in law gave me in the early 1990’s; she found them for free in an estate sale as nobody wanted them. In todays world many people only want to click a mouse and not touch real art?? We could go on hear about my disdain for this syndrome that I think is destroying education, but that is another discussion.

I have added more modern expensive sticks and square cheaper ones over time. Had she not given me these, I would possibly have never started in astronomy sketching. Or I might have only been producing with graphite pencils as I did since childhood aside from taking oil painting in college in 1974, and returning to oils in 1992.

I know the vibrant life-like colors of pastels intimidates some to think it is too much involvement and they are afraid to experience real life as an artist, as you mentioned a “mess” with paper around them and those paper wrapped are the civil cleanest form to use! Quite the contrary! Wait till you get toxic oil paints and turpentine under your nails! Pastels come in pencil form but are not as vibrant as pastel chalk sticks as they add other binders to harden the pencils so the pencil can be sharpened without cracking the chalk. I use the pencils for fine roughing in of lunar detail lines. The pencils come in many ranges of colors but because serious artists want the finer chalk form for rich color and fine works of art, the pencils are not made in as many color ranges as the bare and paper covered chalk sticks.

Pastels can be picked up or out of your pocket in a cinch and scratched onto a paper surface rendering mind blowing life like color that will knock people out! All you have to do is drag it across the paper surface (especially black paper) and then smear it lightly with your fingers or a cotton swab or paper towel or blending stump and voila! Magnifique! You cannot do that with oil paints as they require mixing and brushing wet paint with many expensice accessory materials and that needs to dry for days or weeks on a canvas. Once you progress to pastels (like oil painting) you never go less again except for an occasional sketch to study to start a work of oil or pastel. These two mediums are so intense that it is like you discovered the real world of visual art for the first time. Many people misunderstand these mediums but will eventually progress to them if they do any kind of painting or sketching. Just look in the history books or many artist web site galleries to see photo realisitc works done by many artists today.

Remember, painting is really just sketching with paint (or pastels!)

Enjoy,

Mark

PS- I was forced into retirement after 29 years of IT, now a grandparent at 55 who lost his home he designed and built, maintained for 20 years with a yard and gardens I installed myself worth possibly a hundred thousand alone, all lost in foreclosure a couple years ago. Life in these United States? What can I say? I have allot of free time now but would rather lecture about the art and show it in original form if lecture circuits would apppear, I'd be gone onto the road again. In a failing economy there are no lecture circuits except for Hollywood celebrities and Ralph Nader.

#11 JayKSC

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 10:49 AM

Another stunning work, Mark! The photos done in moonlight, too, are interesting. I didn't realize that the moon's reflected sunlight could look so naturally daylight if done with time exposure.

- Jay
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#12 Shannon s

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 04:18 PM

Thanks for the info Mark.Working on the mural pic. Hate to hear about your forecloser. My wife and I are just making it. She got laid off a year ago from a photo lab. and I am in construction :bawling:. You know how thats going. All you can do is roll with the punches. At least they can't take your art & astronomy from you. However it can slow the process of new telescope goodies down.UUGH.... I hate it.






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