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A Dedication to my Father-in-Law

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#1 JayinUT

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 10:07 PM

I, like most of us, don't speak of my family much here. Much of my time lately is taken up by supporting my wife as her father has been diagnosed with Alzheimer disease. We will know on Thursday the extent. My father-in-law, though having opinions, is very humble and quiet man. He'll do anything for anyone and was a master carpenter. I would have loved to have made a scope with him building the wooden parts. He will do anything for his wife and for his family. I will always think of him as a silent pillar, standing firm and strong for his family. Now he is beginning the slow degrade where his memory will be taken and he doesn't know why. I don't have much to offer him, but in my search of what to do for him and for my wife and her family, a suggestion was made to give of myself, and that a sketch would be appropriate.

So, I would ask for your help. I would like to sketch a DSO and dedicate it to him based on his silent, strong pillar like strength that he is for his family. I have just started to think of this and would welcome suggestions. I would like to do this the weekend of March 13th and forgo a Messier Marathon and spend an evening sketching the object, refining it and really just focusing on that object. Your suggestions on a DSO object that would stand for him would be welcome.

Thanks,

#2 Knuklhdastrnmr

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 10:10 AM

What a great idea. Let me think about a suitable subject. What telescope will you be using? That would give folks an idea of what targets would show well in the eyepiece for you.

#3 blb

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:41 PM

How about the Pillars of life in M16, the Eagle Nebula. I have seen them with my C-11 from a dark sky site.

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#4 BillP

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 02:27 PM

Some ideas for you, to help you decide…

1) The southern constellation Norma is the “Carpeneters Square.” Within it is a very beautiful DSO called Shapley-1 - http://www.astrosurf...apley1-LRGB.jpg

2) The Greek goddess Athen was a protector of artisans. She is also specifically considered the protectress of carpenters. She has several stories related to the constellations, but the closest one would be her reward to the inventer/king ERICHTHONIUS who created the four-horsed chariot (obviously made of wood). She felt it was a great gift to mankind and honored him by placing him among the stars as the constellation Auriga.

3) In Greek mythology, Daidalos (Daedalus) was a skilful craftsman and artisan, including a carpenter of such incredible skill that he actually gave life to a block of wood. One of his son’s was Icarus which of course is an asteroid that you can draw coursing its way thru the sky and by a DSO of your choice.

#5 JanisR

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 02:27 PM

I lost my mother to Alzheimer's, so I know what you're going through just now.

At first I thought of suggesting that you sketch the heart of the Milky Way: it's the source, the hub of our galaxy. But then I thought of my Mom, and I immediately saw the Moon. The reliable old Moon, so familiar that we often take it for granted. It drives the tides and who knows what else on our planet, lights our nights, and one look at its scarred ancient face shows us all the "hard knocks" it has endured and perhaps saved us from suffering. I often look up at the Moon to remind myself of just how much is wonderful and good and reliable in this universe. And when you need it, that kind face will be there, constant, silent and smiling down on you.

Anyway, that's my suggestion.

#6 rolandlinda3

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 02:45 PM

Good idea...and it does something when you deliver the sketch to relatives. We have done similar things and were surprised at what happened. As for objects: there are so many you could do. For people that might get your sketch that are less acquainted with the sky, the Orion nebula is always a keeper. We sent a sketch with it in the past because the stellar cloud folds look like wings. So when you draw the sketch intending the wings to hold someone, put them curved up, or to shelter someone: curved down. Trapezium or brightest area centers the sketch.

#7 JayinUT

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 12:32 AM

Thanks so much. I think from your suggestions I have another idea. He has five children, and I think instead of one sketch, I am going to spend time each month from now (March) through July and do a sketch for each family. We are having a reunion in August so I can present them to everyone there and provide one to him. I think I will captures Orion as he was a hunter and he taught his three sons to hunt. Auriga is a great suggestion and I'll capture that with its open clusters. I then will attempt full moon sketch and see how that goes, backed by the mountains to the east of me that tower up to around 9000 feet. I think capturing the moon as it rises over Wasatch Mountains would be nice. All of these will be framed and since I've been adding sketching with pastels one or two might be done that way.

I'll probably be using a 10 inch reflector at first, and then I might be bumping up to a 15 inch reflector.

#8 proud uncle

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 09:36 AM

He has five children, and I think instead of one sketch, I am going to spend time each month from now (March) through July and do a sketch for each family. We are having a reunion in August so I can present them to everyone there and provide one to him.


What a noble and ambitious plan! A great way to share our hobby with others. Your sketches will likely out-live your father-in-law, and possibly yourself or the other recipients of the sketches. Your sketches will not only inspire the current generation, but possibly future generations long after you are able to share those views directly.

I think I will captures Orion as he was a hunter and he taught his three sons to hunt.


Great idea! There is much symbolism there. He was a hunter, as you mentioned. He has three sons, who are hunters; there are three principal stars to Orion's belt, and three principal stars or star groups to his sword.


I then will attempt full moon sketch and see how that goes, backed by the mountains to the east of me that tower up to around 9000 feet. I think capturing the moon as it rises over Wasatch Mountains would be nice.


Cool! :cool: That should be incredible. Now, if the intended recipient is a UofU or BYU fan, you could also capture the "U" or the "Y" on the mountain! :lol:


. . . since I've been adding sketching with pastels one or two might be done that way.

Have you considered Saturn as one of your targets? Pastels should work good for that one. Pastels would also be good for M42 or the Moon.

Are you planning to sketch on black paper?

Please consider sharing the sketches with us, as you complete them.

Have you decided what the subject will be for your wife's sketch? Or is that confidential?

#9 mandotrout

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 02:17 PM

Jay: Your idea for five sketches sounds fantastic. The reference to the Wasatch Range made me think of a potentially nice sketch. Since you'll be going into summer, I'll bet you could get a really interesting angle on a naked eye sketch of the summer Milky Way. I picture it sort of trailing off over the mountains, with the Sagittarius/Scorpius region sinking to the horizon out on the flats to the south. Just a thought, if your local light pollution would allow it.

#10 markseibold

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 07:38 AM

Jay

Sorry I could not log in for the past couple days and missed this post by you.

That is a humbling situation. We lost our mother a few years ago but not to Alzheimer’s; she was struggling emotionally for the past 20 years of her life and I regreted never really having her look through my telescopes much. Our father is still alive, just passed his 87th birthday last Tuesday, and I cannot get him to ever observe much any more although he was the major driving force to interest my art and astronomy in my childhood. It occurred to me recently, that our father is very much like John Dobson, after I spent dozens of hours with Dobson to provide sidewalk astronomy in our region.

Have you thought of trying to build a telescope with your father in law? I was not sure of his physical condition from your message. Have you ever met with an older group that does this? Dobson is now 94 and still conducting infrequent classes for this. He is not that far from you as he resides in LA.

Also, I did not understand that your father-in-law has ever had the experience of watching you sketch.

I am not sure I could suggest a particular DSO; I'll have to think on that.

I believe that art and science can not only save the young students in our schools; it can enrich the elder student’s lives as well.

Mark






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