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Hubble 5-star Artificial Stars

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#1 mloffland

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 02:12 PM

Hubble 5-star Artificial Stars

#2 7331Peg

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 05:41 PM

Very nice looking refractor you've got there, Bill. You've got excellent taste! :grin:

As far as the Hubble 5-Star goes, I've been using mine to check collimation on several 60mm refractor lenses. I was thrilled to find the results of tests outside at night matched what I was getting inside the house in the daytime. Really is an excellent tool at a very reasonable price.

John

#3 mikiek

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 12:05 AM

Glad it's working for you. I guess the short FL of your scope allows you to use a relatively short distance. With my 11" SCT the thing is pretty much useless. I have to get the light upwards of 100' away to even have a chance of it working.

Walking into a neighbors yard at night (2 houses down) to get the light situated ain't cool.

#4 Jim7728

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 08:58 AM

Great tool to have, especially for those who do not use a driven mount and have less than steady skies when attempting a star test. :cool:

#5 jimarshall

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 02:27 PM

It's the best astro tool that I ever bought. For the first time, I could actually see the airy disc and get perfect collimation on my SCT, however when I raised the scope from the horizon position to the sky, it was off again due to the slight mirror shift. It did prove however that perfect collimation was possible and not really all that hard when you can actually see the star patterns that are described in the various articles on collimation. In my opinion, it looked much better than a real star.

#6 Joe Lalumia

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 06:47 PM

Guess I am going to have to figure out how to mount this up in a tree! to avoid mirror shift on my LX90. :)

Bought one but have not used it yet. Still in the box. Thanks for reviewing this.

#7 doctordub

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 10:08 AM

I open a window of a bedroom on the third floor of my house and use a camera tripod to hold it outside the window. I aim my telescope from my backyard as it is lower than the frontyard( added height of walk out basement) at a 50 degree angle to collimate my two CATs.
CS

#8 donjoy

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 08:50 AM

HI i just bought this lite but have not used it yet.i asked the dealer(2nd time)as to the return policy.i was at a well known lumber outlet yesterday and came upon some flashlights on sale,three in a pack for 9.99,when i looked at it,they are the same as the hubble5star except for the thin plastic with the holes at the front of the light.i thought HEY I could have made this myself.am i missing something here. Don

#9 hudson_yak

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 09:37 AM

It's steel (the mask is magnetic, remember), and drilling precisely round holes of those sizes is pretty tricky. I read somewhere they use a laser to cut them.

Mike

#10 donjoy

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 02:34 PM

cool-thanks,now i don't feel like i wasted my money.at least i know where to get extra flashlights. Don

#11 deSitter

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 06:54 AM

Keep in mind that this gizmo must be far away to test optics. Otherwise SA will appear that is an artifact of the near target.

-drl

#12 morden8uk

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 04:31 AM

Very nice looking refractor you've got there, Bill. You've got excellent taste! :grin:

As far as the Hubble 5-Star goes, I've been using mine to check collimation on several 60mm refractor lenses. I was thrilled to find the results of tests outside at night matched what I was getting inside the house in the daytime. Really is an excellent tool at a very reasonable price.

John


Sorry to dig up an older thread.. I'm hoping this tool (if still available) will be ok to check my WO 66SD which I think is off!!.. William Optics have suggested an artificial star to check it.

Thanks
Rob

#13 jimarshall

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 03:42 PM

Very nice looking refractor you've got there, Bill. You've got excellent taste! :grin:

As far as the Hubble 5-Star goes, I've been using mine to check collimation on several 60mm refractor lenses. I was thrilled to find the results of tests outside at night matched what I was getting inside the house in the daytime. Really is an excellent tool at a very reasonable price.

John


Sorry to dig up an older thread.. I'm hoping this tool (if still available) will be ok to check my WO 66SD which I think is off!!.. William Optics have suggested an artificial star to check it.

Thanks
Rob

I prefer the cheshire collimation eyepiece for refractors. you can do it indoors, during daylight and without the need for a lot of space.
http://spacealberta....r/collimate.htm






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