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Orion's Stratus Eyepieces in an 8" f/4.9 Newtonian

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#1 Olivier Biot

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 05:59 PM

Orion's Stratus Eyepieces - Impressions of Performance in an f/4.9 Newtonian (203mm Aperture)

#2 Charles Funk

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 05:13 PM

I just stumbled across this review, and it's from June of 2010? With zero comments?

I have every one of those eyepieces except the 24mm. I tend to agree with this author in that they are pretty good for the money, even in my f 4.8 12.5" dob.

No, they are not Naglers. They are not absolute perfection in the eyepiece world. But they are an excellent value. That is they do a pretty good job considering their price point.

I don't lose any sleep whatsoever knowing their shortcomings, I just appreciate the view, and the views are fine. The target in the center of the fov is what I am generally looking at anyway, so that last 10 - 15% of the view that suffers from common eyepiece ailments, which BTW is something you kinda have to look for in these eyepieces... is no big deal. YMMV.

For those of us out there that are looking for that sweet spot where value and performance meet, The Stratus and I would assume their Hyperion counterparts, do a pretty good job of hitting that crossroads.

#3 jrbarnett

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 09:42 PM

"...The target in the center of the fov is what I am generally looking at anyway..."

True, but pretty much every eyepiece performs well on-axis. Stratuses and the similar Hyperions cost much more than any number of other eyepieces that match or even in some cases exceed these on-axis.

When it comes to value, then, and you're mostly concerned with on-axis performance, the extra cost of these versus a set of garden variety Plossls might come down on the side of the Plossls. Though they aren't particularly well-corrected off axis in a fast scope, in a slower scope they have a larger well-corrected field of view. Also in any scope they offer long, comfortable, uniform eye relief, which is really important for eyeglass wearers.

But the thing that kind of pushed these "out into the weeds" was the advent of the affordable Explore Scientific 82 and 68 eyepieces. For about the same price as the Stratuses and Hyperions, you can get either of these, and unlike the Strats/Hyperions, the ES units are well corrected off axis in fast scopes. Though the ES units tend to have tight eye relief in short focal lengths.

The value quotient of the Strats/Hyperions may be improving shortly as the ES eyepieces seem to be going up in price. So it may be that things will come full circle and the Strats and Hyperions will return to the high value status they had before the nearly perma-sale-priced ES 68s and 82s.

Regards,

Jim

#4 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 02:13 AM

No, they are not Naglers. They are not absolute perfection in the eyepiece world. But they are an excellent value. That is they do a pretty good job considering their price point.



I owned the 13mm Stratus for a while. Not a bad eyepiece but I was never happy with the off-axis performance. I used it in a variety of scopes including a couple of faster Dobs with a Paracorr.

I agree with Jim's assessment, the 16 mm and 24mm Meade SWAs are much better corrected for astigmatism and are evenly illuminated across the field of view.

The Stratus's, they have the eye relief, so for eye glass wearers, they are a good choice.

Jon

#5 desertstars

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 11:32 AM

I'd forgotten I even posted this! :roflmao:

But the thing that kind of pushed these "out into the weeds" was the advent of the affordable Explore Scientific 82 and 68 eyepieces. For about the same price as the Stratuses and Hyperions, you can get either of these, and unlike the Strats/Hyperions, the ES units are well corrected off axis in fast scopes. Though the ES units tend to have tight eye relief in short focal lengths.


If the Explore Scientific eyepieces had been available at the time I decided on the Stratus set, I might have a very different eyepiece collection. So it goes; the price of not being able to predict the future. ;)

However, eye relief has become more of an issue for me in the years since this review was posted, so I am more pleased than ever with where I settled. Flaws in off-axis performance still don't bother me nearly as much as they do some people - YMMV (my way of saying I no longer argue the point.) In any case, the Paracorr I mention in the review is more-or-less "permanently" installed in the Three-legged Newt these days. Not a perfect solution, but enough of a difference-maker for my purposes. :cool:

#6 Charles Funk

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:23 AM

I have to admit the Explore Scientific series has had my eye for a while. The urge to splurge is strong. :)

...and I have a few plossls in the box too. For more serious planetary they get some light.

#7 The Mighty Mo

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 09:27 AM

However, eye relief has become more of an issue for me in the years since this review was posted, so I am more pleased than ever with where I settled. Flaws in off-axis performance still don't bother me nearly as much as they do some people - YMMV (my way of saying I no longer argue the point.)

Not a perfect solution, but enough of a difference-maker for my purposes. :cool:


Those two statements pretty much sums up my feelings of the Stratus and Hyperion line as well. When I bought mine the ES wasn't available yet, but the ES wasn't really what I was looking for. I wanted, and got a cost effective good compromise to the Pentax XW's which I can't afford. The Stratus/Hyperion are pretty good eyepieces, with decent all-around performance, a decent wide-field, some of the best color transmission I've seen, and plenty of eye relief for relaxed viewing. The only two places they fail vs. the XW's (IMO) are off-axis views in fast scopes, which I'm not using now anyway (they're great in my f/8), and soft planetary views.

#8 beanerds

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 09:57 AM

I have the Baadar version 3.5mm , its only used in my SKY90 for 160x on the moon and planets , its almost as good as my TV Radian 3mm in the Tak .
Unscrew the barlow and I have a 28-32mm WA , awfull wide field at f5.5 , sea guyll city , ugly ! sad but tru .

But that 28-30mm is quite good in my f/8 Istar achromat , 3.5 gives 285x , capable but nights wont allow it much , Saturn calls .
So the 3.5 is very good at what it's made for ie. high power , good stuff .
Its 28-32 is OK but needs f/10 and then its not bad .

I like mine .

Brian.

#9 desertstars

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 02:11 PM

Unscrew the barlow and I have a 28-32mm WA , awfull wide field at f5.5 , sea guyll city , ugly ! sad but tru.


I gave this a try, early on, after seeing so much discussion of this "feature." Seagulls? Er, yes...seagulls on the windshield of a speed boat. Not a "feature" when you're at f/4.9! :shocked:

I like mine.



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