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Rupes Recta region

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#1 Crusader

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 01:26 PM

I'm not much of a lunar observer and haven't even tried sketching lunar features before.

Last night I took my newest telescope addition, a Skywatcher 6" f/8 Dob for a test drive. Since the Moon was the brightest object in the sky I gave it a go and spotted an interesting feature. Grabbed a paper and pencil and did a quick sketch for identification purposes.

Initially I thought I was just seeing an odd shadow, but afterwards using the sketch I could identify the feature as Rupes Recta, not a shadow, but an actual rille.

At least the sketch fulfilled its purpose...

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#2 Uwe Pilz

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 02:26 PM

Dear Crusader,

keep sketching! The first sketches are only raw outlines, but their are much better als no sketch at all. If you sketch you see more.
In a short time your sketches get better and better and the amount of seen detail also.

If youl look at the moon section of my astronomy pages you will find my first sketches similar to yous. You may check for yourself how things have changed in my sketching.

#3 frank5817

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 02:42 PM

Crusader,

You have captured all the key elements of the Rupes Recta region. I see little Birt and Birt A on one side and Thebit and Arzachel on the other side.

Very nice. :cool: :rainbow:

Frank :)

#4 CarlosEH

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 04:46 AM

Crusader,

You are well on your way in recording our nearest celestial neighbor and companion, the Moon. All lunar observations begin with an outline as you have provided. Lunar features and shadings are then gradually added to the sketch. You can learn a great deal by studying the lunar observations provided by the talented observers/artists on this forum. I have provided some links on lunar tutorials below.

Links;
http://www.cloudynig...5/o/all/fpart/1 (CN Lunar Sketching Tutorials)
http://www.popastro..../observing6.php (excellent tutorial by lunar observer/author Peter Grego)
http://www.baalunars...wingjohnson.htm (An excellent tutorial on the BAA Lunar Section web site by Andrew Johnson)
http://www.cloudynig...uments/moon.pdf (Excellent tutorial by Daniel Mounsey)

Carlos

#5 Crusader

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 07:43 AM

Thanks for the positive feedback guys. I'll see if I can hone my skills, but unlike star clusters I think you need much more artistic talent to do lunar sketching.

#6 Uwe Pilz

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 08:41 AM

It are not artistic skills in a closer sense. You managed the first step: To draw areas an lines in the right for an size. The next step is to shadow the area, may be in a first step only raw. This gives a ┬žd impression. Shadings may refined later.

#7 Jef De Wit

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 02:53 PM

Crusader. Be warned before you make your second lunarsketch, it could be addictive :crazy: And don't worry about artistic skills. I haven't any and still enjoy sketching the Moon a lot!






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