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Sketch of SEB Activity on Jupiter 7-25-10 6 UT

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#1 Sarkikos

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 01:54 PM

Last night, 7-24-10 through 7-25-10, I setup my Zhumell 8" f/6 Newt Dob beside my house to observe the Moon and Jupiter. This was between about 11:30 pm and 3:30 am EDT. It was Lunar Day 14, the sky was cloudless, the transparency above average, and the seeing about 3.5/5.

I did not use any filters. I had carefully collimated the scope with a Cheshire/sight tube and an autocollimator. I turned on the baffled fan behind the primary. The OTA and focuser are fully flocked with Protostar. I was using a Burgess Binoviewer with a 1.9X OC together with various pairs of eyepieces. The set which gave me the most pleasing views was a pair of Orion ED-2 22mm eyepieces, which yielded 104X, 0.5 TFOV, and 2mm exit pupil. The ED-2s were sharp edge-to-edge and showed excellent color and detail. (Yes, the much-maligned ED-2s! Go figure!)

I began sketching Jupiter at about 6 UT. The sketch is in the inverted orientation. The GRS was red and obvious. A trailing line was on the p side of the GRS. There was much activity in the SEB, which was darker than the last time I observed several weeks ago, but still not as dark as the NEB. The NEB had an obvious white notch toward the N p edge. SEBn was a light blue-grey, and showed a number of wavy formations.

Mike

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#2 CarlosEH

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 03:44 PM

Mike,

An excellent observation and report of Jupiter. You have captured much detail across the jovian disk, especially between the South Equatorial Belt (SEB)/Equatorial Zone (EZ)/North Equatorial Belt (NEB). The Great Red Spot (GRS) is very prominent, as you point out. Thank you for sharing it with us all.

I took your fine observation and cropped it according to the proportionality if Jupiter (Polar diameter ~92% that of the Equatorial diameter). I then adjusted the levels and have attached the image below. I hope that you like it.

Jeremy Perez and Sol Robbins provide excellent templates with the correct dimensions ( http://www.perezmedi.../templates.html ).

I look forward to your future observations.

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#3 Sarkikos

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 06:38 PM

Carlos,

Thanks. I was expecting your enhancement of my sketch. It looks much better now. :grin:

Mike

#4 Sarkikos

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 06:42 PM

Also, thanks, Carlos, for the link to the Belt of Venus website. I did my sketch on the spur on the moment and did not have at hand a template for Jupiter. I'll be sure to keep some copies in my observing bag.

Mike

#5 Special Ed

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 07:05 AM

Mike,

That's a good sketch with loads of detail. You took a very careful look at Jupiter. This is what observational sketching is all about. :waytogo:

#6 Sarkikos

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 07:38 AM

Michael,

Thanks much. I wish I had been able to put in all the fine detail I could see in moments of clearer seeing, especially in the N SEB and the EZ. I am sure there was a network of light blue-gray festoons that I did not capture fully in the sketch. I really should learn the tricks and techniques of sketching. Also, I'm sure there is a logical order in which to do a sketch so that you can include the most detail in the least amount of time. That's really important for Jupiter, since its rotation period is only about 9hrs, constantly bringing new detail into view and removing the old.

Last Spring when I was sketching Mars, I had intended to improve my skills by making practice drawings of photos of Mars positioned across the room from me, but I never got around to it. Maybe I could do that for Jupiter. It might be a good method to increase speed and skill without wasting time at the eyepiece.

Mike

#7 frank5817

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 09:31 AM

Mike,

Wonderful Jupiter sketching. Your view of the planet was exceptional. Hopefully you will have additional chances at this go around. :bow: :cool:

Frank :)

#8 Sarkikos

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 08:56 AM

Frank,

Next time I might use my 10" Newt to view Jupiter. I've constructed an apodizing filter to fit that scope. I viewed Mars through the filter last spring, but I did not notice any improvement in detail or contrast. Apodizing filters are supposed to work very well with Jupiter, so I'll see if that's true.

Also, since a 2mm exit pupil gives me good views of Jupiter and the Moon, I've investigated other eyepiece setups that would yield around 2mm in my scopes. I have an ES 100 deg 14mm that will give a 2mm exit pupil, 129X and 0.8 TFOV in my 10" Newt if I screw a 1.5X Barlow lens cell onto the end of the eyepiece. That would be an interesting experiment. (Of course, I would no longer have the binoviewing effect.) I just hope it will come to focus in my scope and I can balance it on the Dob mount!

Mike






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