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Jupiter Observation (October 2, 2010)

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#1 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:03 AM

I enjoyed one of the finest observations of Jupiter that I have had in many years on October 2, 2010. The seeing that night was good to very good (7-8/10) with moments of nearly perfect seeing (9/10). Jupiter exhibited a wealth of detail that at first overwhelming to render but after carefully reviewing it in sections I finally was able to render what was was visible. I could have just studied sections of the planet the entire observing session considering the amount of detail visible. I was even able to make out impressive, in my opinion, detail over Ganymede (III) whereas all the other Galilean satellites exhibited sharp discs (Io (I) was a pastel reddish-orange color as rendered in the detailed insert). I also made sectional sketches of interesting regions of the planet, namely the North Equatorial Belt (NEB) and the South Temperate Belt (STB). I welcome any comments no my observations.

Date (U.T.): October 2, 2010
Time (U.T.): 03:45
L1 80.6*, L2 336.8*, L3 185.2*
De 2.3*, Ds 2.1*, -2.77m, 49.6” (Equatorial)
Instrument: 9-inch (23-cm) F/13.5 Maksutov-Cassegrain
Magnification: 310x
Filters: None (IL)
Seeing (1-10): 7-8 (periods of 9), Antoniadi (I-V) II
Transparency (1-6): 4

Notes:
South Polar Region (SPR): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) and mottled. The SPR exhibited a pastel bluish-gray color which was diffuse and mottled. A bright (7/10) oval was noted following the central meridian (CM) over the northern portion of the SPR.
South South South Temperate Belt (SSSTB): Appears thin, dark to dusky (3-4/10), and irregular.
South South South Temperate Zone (SSSTZ): Appears shaded (6/10) and irregular (mostly following the CM). The portion on the CM appears wider than the rest of the zone.
South South Temperate Belt (SSTB): Appears thin, and dark to dusky (3-4/10) and connecting to a dark (3/10) complex (containing a bright (7/10) oval and also connecting to the STB) preceding the CM.
South Temperate Zone (STZ): Appears bright (7/10) and interrupted by the SSTB-STB complex described above.
South Temperate Belt (STB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) and connecting to a dark (3/10) complex preceding the CM which also connects to the SSTB. The preceding half appears thicker than the following half.
South Tropical Zone (STrZ): Appears bright (7/10) without any detail visible within.
South Equatorial Belt (SEB): Appears still diminished in intensity, but dull (5/10) streaks are noted throughout the belt. It appears a pastel pinkish-gray color.
Equatorial Zone (EZ): Appears bright (7/10) with dull (5/10) streaks noted throughout. A few of the streaks appear to connect to the southern border of the NEB.
North Equatorial Belt (NEB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) and containing a bright to very bright (7-8/10) rift on the CM which then curves and follows the belt towards the following limb. A dark to very dark (2-3/10) blue festoon base is noted at the EZ entrance of the rift. A large and dark (3/10) condensation is noted to be adjacent to the bright rift preceding the CM.
North Tropical Zone (NTrZ): Appears shaded to bright (6-7/10) without any other detail visible within.
North Temperate Belt (STB) Appears irregular and composed of discrete, dark (3/10) condensations (similar to “beads on a necklace”)connected over sections of it preceding and following the CM.
North Temperate Zone (STZ): Appears thin and shaded (6/10) and no other detail is visible within.
North North Temperate Belt (SSTB): Appears as a thin and smaller version of the STB (dusky condensations (4/10).
North Polar Region (NPR): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) and exhibits a similar bluish-gray mottling to that of the NPR, but more prominent.

A digital image produced in Pixelmator.

Carlos

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#2 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:04 AM

A wide field observation of Jupiter (129x) showing the four Galilean satellites. The satellites visible were, preceding to following, Io (I, 5.29m), Callisto (5.89m), Ganymede (4.89m) and Europa (5.57m). All of the Galilean satellites exhibited sharp discs and prominent colors (Io a pastel reddish-orange (see insert), Callisto a speckled brown, Ganymede a pastel cream and brown with albedo features noted (see insert and legend), and Europa an off-white). The upper left insert contains a detailed sketch of Io (I) at 443x which exhibits a pastel reddish-orange color. The upper right insert contains a detailed sketch of Ganymede (III) which exhibited albedo features as indicated by the legend (a labeled disk of ganymede provided by the NASA-JPL Solar System Simulator) below.

Digital images produced using Pixelmator.

Carlos

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#3 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:05 AM

An image of Ganymede produced by the NASA-JPL Solar System Simulator for October 2, 2010 at 03:45 U.T. I have labeled the major albedo features visible and flipped the satellite to match my observation.

Carlos

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#4 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:06 AM

A comparison of my Ganymede observation compared to an image of Ganymede produced by the NASA-JPL Solar System Simulator (blurred to approximate the level of resolution of my own observation).

Carlos

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#5 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:06 AM

A sectional sketch of the North Equatorial Belt (NEB) of Jupiter made on October 2, 2010 (03:45 U.T.). The NEB exhibited a reddish-brown color and much detail within. A bright to very bright (7-8/10) rift was noted to originate at the southern border of the NEB just preceding the CM which curved to the north and then extended towards the following limb. A dark (3/10) brown condensation was noted preceding the bright rift over the northern half of the belt. The southern border of the NEB exhibited dark bluish condensations (bases of the blue festoons?).

A digital image produced using Pixelmator.

Carlos

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#6 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:07 AM

A sectional sketch of the North Temperate Belt (NTB) region of Jupiter on October 2, 2010 (03:45 U.T.). The South Temperate Belt (STB) appeared to be composed of a “string of beads on a necklace” both preceding and following the CM. The section following the CM was longer in length. The North Temperate Zone (NTZ) appeared shaded to bright (6-7/10). The North North Temperate Belt (NNTB) is also composed of dusky (4/10) condensations and irregular. A dark (3/10) condensation was noted within the North North Temperate Zone (NNTZ) preceding the CM. The North North North Temperate Belt (NNNTB) appeared dusky to dull (4-5/100 and mottled.

A digital image produced in Pixelmator.

Carlos

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#7 S1mas

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 01:51 AM

Amazing compilation Carlos. Especially on Ganimede - unbelievable details. Thanks for sharing.

#8 markseibold

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 04:03 AM

Carlos

Outstanding observation and detailed artwork! Also, your impressive detailed and useful text. :bow: :bow: :bow:

I would like to forward your post here to alert others whom I know that have not ever even observed Jupiter or the moon through a telescope. The details you are indicating observed on Jupiter are impressive alone, yet further images you have depicted of Jupiter’s moon, Ganymede's surface.

Thanks for sharing this impressive observation and sketch-work with us.

Mark

#9 Sol Robbins

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 07:19 AM

Excellent observations!

#10 mathteacher

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 08:33 AM

:bow: :waytogo:

#11 Jef De Wit

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 09:01 AM

Wow! It's more a whole study than just an observation! I dream to see sometime detail in the moons of Jupiter. Meanwhile I will look at your sketches.

#12 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 09:14 AM

Thank you all for the very kind compliments on my latest observation of Jupiter and it's satellites, especially Ganymede. This was a special observation of Jupiter for me that I do not generally enjoy. The conditions all came together for me in order to see all that I recorded.I have noted detail over the Galilean satellites in the past but this is probably the best that I have ever seen Ganymede. I hope that you all enjoy such views of Jupiter in the future.

Mark- You may use my observations to alert others on what is visible over Jupiter. The best of luck in your own observations.

Carlos

#13 lunar

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:40 PM

Very nice sketch! I like the observation of Ganymede and Io especially. They are quite fascinating! I'm planning on some type of a barlow or 4-3MM TMB so I can study these surface features while it's still up, but they're a little way off. Thanks for posting the actual appearence of Ganymede for comparisons as well.

#14 GRAFFIAS

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 05:45 PM

Inspiring stuff. Having seen what you accomplished will make me pay closer attention to the moons.

#15 CarlosEH

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 06:05 PM

Brandon and GRAFFIAS,

Thank you for the compliment on my set of Jupiter and Ganymede observations. I was fortunate to enjoy such wonderful seeing conditions. The best of luck in your own observations of Jupiter.

Carlos

#16 Alan A.

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 06:38 PM

Carlos - tremendous sketches!!! Really beautiful.

#17 Tommy5

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 06:48 PM

Wow great sketches and observations, you have outdone yourself, i have seen some of jup bands portrayed as a string of beads on the best webcam photos but never in a sketch from a visual observation, outstanding stuff, thanks again for posting.

#18 frank5817

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 09:32 PM

Carlos,

What an outstanding post. The details on Jupiter and Io and Ganymede are beyond amazing. I am flabbergasted at what you are seeing and recording. :bow: :rainbow:

Frank :)

#19 CarlosEH

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 12:59 AM

Thank you all for the kind compliments on my Jupiter and Ganymede observations. I was very fortunate to have experienced very good seeing conditions and Jupiter is closer to the Earth as compared to previous apparitions. Bead-like structures have been recorded on Jupiter by astronomers (amateurs and professionals) as early as the late 1800's. I have attached an observation of Jupiter that I made on April 13, 1990 (02:19 U.T; L1 104.7*, L2 170.8*, L3 188.0*, Celestron 8-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain, 200-286x, S: 7/10, T: 5/6) when the SEB was also missing (how ironic!) which showed bead-like albedo features over the South Temperate Belt (STB). Also notice the festoon-like feature projecting from the northern border of the NEB and connecting to the beads. The shadow of Europa (II) is visible over the South Tropical Zone (STrZ).

The best of luck in your own observations of Jupiter.

Carlos

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#20 Jeremy Perez

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 01:47 AM

This is a wonderful series, Carlos! Excellent observations AND sketches. I am especially stunned by Ganymede.

#21 CarlosEH

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 10:26 AM

Jeremy,

Thank you for the compliment on my Jupiter and Ganymede observations. I am glad that you have enjoyed them. Ganymede was a real treat for me. The best of luck in your own observations.

Carlos

#22 Homa

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 06:26 PM

Hi,Carlos
you show fantastic details :cool: :bow: Thanks :)
thats was a century night ;)
Regards Marc

#23 BillP

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 01:26 AM

Breathtaking :bow: :bow: :bow:

#24 CarlosEH

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 07:11 AM

Bill and Marc,

Thank you for the kind compliments on my Jupiter and Ganymede observations. It was special night to be able to see so much detail over Jupiter and especially Ganymede. I hope that we can all obtain excellent views of Jupiter soon.

Bill- I do not know if I wold have seen more using the Ball Lens?

The best of luck in your own observations of Jupiter.

Carlos

#25 dweller25

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 10:38 AM

Simply stunning Carlos, thanks for sharing.






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