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Tripod Leg Extensions

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#1 armond

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 06:07 PM

I prefer height on my telescope as I don't like kneeling down when pointing to the zenith however is it true that there is an increase in overall vibration if your tripod's leg extensions are fully extended?

#2 Terrance

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 10:22 PM

Yes. Extending the legs does tend to increase the mount's susceptibility to vibrations. This has happened with every mount I have tried. The only "stability" advantage of extending the legs are to make it less apt to tip over when shoved on or bumped into. Therefore, like everything else there are compromises to made.

Those who want to stand up while viewing to the zenith often use an extension posts which some mount makers sell as an accessory to some mounts, which puts a cylindrical post between the tripod head and the mount head giving additional height without extending the length of the tripod leg.

There are other methods of course, such as vibration pads, or adding weight to the scope over all to make it heavier and thus less shaky.

#3 armond

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 10:35 PM

There are other methods of course, such as vibration pads, or adding weight to the scope over all to make it heavier and thus less shaky.


Would the strap on sleeve type weights runner's use on their legs while exercising be a good idea to strap on to each leg of the tripod? Say 2.5lbs each leg?

#4 Phil Wheeler

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 10:38 PM

There are other methods of course, such as vibration pads, or adding weight to the scope over all to make it heavier and thus less shaky.


Vibration pads (mine are from Celestron) are very effective if your scope sits on a patio or in a parking lot.

A good way to add weight is to suspend a heavy item from the spreader (sometimes having space for EPs and such) which most tripods have. Metal weights work and I've even seen some use a bag of sand.

#5 Terrance

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 01:33 PM

Putting weights on the legs ought to work fine if you can connect them in a convenient way. I have never tried that, but it ought to work.

Someone in our astronomy club, put bolts on his tripod legs which accepted counter weights. I do not know how he did it as I am not mechanical at all. However a part of his setup routine with a heavy scope is to screw on weights to near the bottom of the tripod legs. strapping weights on ought to have the same effect, although I think the weights he is using for his rig are much heavier than the 2.5 pound ankle weights.

Vibration suppression pads are less effective if your scope is on ground, than they are when on a deck or pavement.

#6 jrford

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Posted 22 February 2011 - 11:14 AM

Would the strap on sleeve type weights runner's use on their legs while exercising be a good idea to strap on to each leg of the tripod? Say 2.5lbs each leg?


I'm using exactly that. More to lower the center of gravity then dampen vibs. I'm using a Nexstar8 on the std tripod. Of course you get an extra weight. When mounted i hang them from the spreader or on the knobs that hold the legs.






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