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Byers 812 and Rotating tube rings

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#1 opticsguy

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:50 PM

Any one here familiar with the older Byers 812 mounting? My plan is to drag out the old 812 mount and set up for a 12" newt. The drive motor is 110 volt AC and planning to use this mounting in the field using a converter to 12V DC. Any ideas as to how long I can run this mounting on a "standard" automotive 12V battery?

I am a visual observer and plan to use the old fashioned setting circles for locating objects and enjoying the night skies.

Another topic here would be rotating rings. The scope I am purchasing has standard rings which would often put the eyepiece in some awkward positions. What is available in rotating rings?

Thanks for any advice.

#2 frolinmod

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 10:04 PM

Any ideas as to how long I can run this mounting on a "standard" automotive 12V battery?

If it's not a GOTO mount and all it's doing is tracking not slewing, then that sounds like a simple synchronous drive and your typical 12V automobile battery will probably drive it for a very long time, I'd think several nights at least.

#3 hottr6

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 09:37 AM

Any one here familiar with the older Byers 812 mounting? My plan is to drag out the old 812 mount and set up for a 12" newt. The drive motor is 110 volt AC and planning to use this mounting in the field using a converter to 12V DC. Any ideas as to how long I can run this mounting on a "standard" automotive 12V battery?

The Hurst synchronous "clock" motors that our Byers mounts use are rated at 3W, or 24mA. Depending on the size of your battery, that could last a few hundred hours. The inverter that you use will consume a lot more power, so that should be factored into the calculation.

I used a "pure-sine" inverter, though given the errors inherent in using a clock motor, the pure-sine inverter is overkill. However, my inverter can also power my laptop, so the extra $$$ for the pure-sine inverter is worth it.

Nowadays, I use a Vogel Electronic Digitrak, which converts the 60Hz line to run the clock motor at sidereal, lunar or solar time. This unit is equipped with 2x6V 4.5Ah rechargeable batteries, and is the only power I need.

Another topic here would be rotating rings. The scope I am purchasing has standard rings which would often put the eyepiece in some awkward positions. What is available in rotating rings?


I picked up a used pair of non-rotating Parallax rings for my 10" w/sonotube. They are pricey, and I had to play with differing thicknesses of felt padding to get the "right" friction that would allow me to rotate the tube (with rings loosened), yet hold the OTA firmly. Parallax do make rotating rings, and I expect they could make them to order if their standard rings do not fit your application. They could cost as much as your OTA. :shocked:






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