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How to Locate Some of the Major Messier Galaxies and Helpful Advice for Novice Amateur Astronomers

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#26 Greyhaven

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 04:28 PM

I thank you for your very well done and very useful project for all levels of astronomers. I'll reference it often.
Be Well
Grey

#27 Jammer53

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 12:28 PM

As a former moderator for six years I appreciate all the effort that you put into this for us Dave. Thanks very much for that.

I'll make use of it often.

Jim

PS: Star Ware is currently unavailable at Amazon for the Kindle. Seems they are pulling it until they investigate certain issues that were brought to their attention. ;)

#28 Meadeball

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:13 PM

I received a new book for Christmas; I like it because it's pocket-sized yet really, really detailed:

The Observer’s Sky Atlas by Erich Karkoschka.

Wondering if any of you have tried it out?

Meade

#29 jkaiser

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 11:53 AM

Hello,
I am new to Cloudy Nights and wanted to thank you for all the links they were very helpful and loaded with alot of info. I been using a 4" astroscan from Edmund scientifics for the past year and now its time to upgrade, so this week I am purchasing a Celestron Omni 102xlt and at the same time I am also upgrading to the Zhumell Z10, I am very excited and can't wait, I have been saving all year for those 2 scopes....Again thank you for the links and thank you Cloudy Nights for being readily available. :cool:

#30 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 05:23 PM

I received a new book for Christmas; I like it because it's pocket-sized yet really, really detailed:

The Observer’s Sky Atlas by Erich Karkoschka.

Wondering if any of you have tried it out?

Meade


I don't happen to own it but I have seen a copy of The Observer's Sky Atlas at NEAF, I believe. It has quite a good reputation.

Dave Mitsky

#31 krebs

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 05:41 PM

Thanks! Just got the bug a year ago and naturally started "behind" backwards with a little 90mm scope. Kinda got tired of looking at Saturn, Jupiter and the moon... Your instructions will be good and never knew that my Binoculars would be so handy!

#32 kenrenard

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 06:41 AM

Dave,
I want to thank you for you book tips. I bought Star Hopping for Backyard Astronomers used on Amazon. I would have never came across that book had it not been for your post and suggestion.

It really is a great book with loads of information. I've been able to learn quite a bit from 3 days of reading.

Thanks Again


Ken

#33 lamplight

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:18 PM

Thank you dave

#34 budafuko

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 01:22 PM

Thanks Dave.

#35 JoeSmith

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 01:45 PM

Thank you Dave. This will give me even more reading on cloudy nights which is about 70% of the time around here. :(

#36 PhotonFanatic

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 09:40 PM

:rockon:

#37 jarhead

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 08:12 PM

I just joined recently. I have already shared this in my other beginner area. You need to pay a visit to MESSIER 45 This is a GREAT site, as far as a newbie like me, because it has hotlinks to each object. It has listings of Messier , NGC, IC, Herschel, and separate areas with Most Popular, Popular Galaxies, The 88 Constellations, Open Clusters, and Planetary Nebulae. The link for the site is http://messier45.com/

#38 Terry Dactile

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 08:38 PM

I just joined recently. I have already shared this in my other beginner area. You need to pay a visit to MESSIER 45 This is a GREAT site, as far as a newbie like me, because it has hotlinks to each object. It has listings of Messier , NGC, IC, Herschel, and separate areas with Most Popular, Popular Galaxies, The 88 Constellations, Open Clusters, and Planetary Nebulae. The link for the site is http://messier45.com/


This looks like a great website but nothing on the page seems to work. Anyone else having problems with it?

#39 jarhead

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 11:05 AM

Darn! It works for me and I'm on a Linux box. I have trouble with several sites and have to boot up (Stupid) Windows 7.

#40 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 02:46 PM

Messier45.com seems to work for me. What OS are you using?

Dave Mitsky

#41 WaterMaster

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 06:57 PM

I had no problem accessing from either a Windows 7 (Firefox) or my Mac (Safari). :shrug:

#42 PhaedrusUpshaw

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 11:56 PM

The Backyard Astronomers Guide is a reference book I find myself returning to time and time again.
Clear skies to all,
Bill

#43 Benson

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:04 AM

Star hopping can be very ... interesting. I usually retire for a vodka martini when frustrated - shaken, not stirred.

#44 nikdangr

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 03:34 PM

Footnote: Several copies of Star-Hopping for Backyard Astronomers are available used from Amazon for as low as $18.

#45 mac57

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:29 PM

Hi, my name is Mark and I am a 55 year old novice, but I aced my college Intro Astronomy course, so I know a little. As an observer, I am a beginner. I am trying to decide on a first scope, and am torn between an 8" Dobsonian, or something on an EQ mount. I like the idea of an EQ mount, because I don't want to constantly be distracted by moving the Dob. Is this a big deal? I know that the cheap EQ mounts have their drawbacks, but is the tradeoff worth it? Please explain, and grateful for your input.

#46 Doc Willie

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 11:37 AM

The hassle of manually moving an 8' Dob to keep a target in the field of view is less than the hassle of dealing with a cheap EQ mount. IMHO.

The former is more likely to induce you to upgrade to a better telescope. The latter is more likely to induce you to give up the sport.

#47 rinalmj

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:13 PM

I don't think it's a very big deal. I've done most of my observing with 8" and 12" dobs and very rarely found it to be a problem. Wide-field eyepieces help a lot with this too. The only times I've ever thought that re-positioning was a distraction are times when I've used extremely high magnifications (>300X), but sky conditions rarely permit that anyway.

#48 csrlice12

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:58 PM

While I do like the tracking of my EQ mount, I still enjoy the views my dob gives me better. With wide-field eyepieces, viewing thru the dob is a pleasant experience...

#49 mman22

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:08 PM

I don't find tracking with my 8" dob to be distracting at all. As far as moving to new objects, naked eye is very easy to do.

#50 RocketScientist

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 08:53 PM

Thanks Dave! I still have yet to get M101...


I have seen M101 with 80mm from a dark sky site in the Sierra Nevada mountains, but I cannot find it with 250mm from my condo (mag 4.5 skies). Low-surface-brightness galaxies are one class of object where aperture is not a substitute for dark skies.

M104, on the other hand, is visible with 80mm from my home. As noted, it's smaller and has higher surface brightness.


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