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Rotifer?

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#1 caheaton

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 01:21 PM

Hello...fairly new to microscopy and have a question about an organism I observed. It had a roughly egg shaped body with a ridge running around the "equator" (think of an egg standing on end). It had 3 appendages, one longer one coming from the front (top of egg) and 3 in the rear spaced about 120 degrees from one another and extending at an angle relative to the body (30 degrees or so). At magnification you could see that there were tiny structures (akin to stingers on a jellfyfish?) on the appendages. The body was largely clear, but the main body had a translucent greenish hue. The organism was fairly large, as it was easily observed at magnifications as low as 40X, but it did take 125X to observe the structure on the appendages. Also, the front appendage was perhaps 2 to 3 times the length of the main body and the three rear appendages were around 2/3rds the length of the front appendage.

At first I thought maybe it was a variety of hydra, but none of the hydra I've seen in photos resembled this creature. Now I'm thinking maybe it was some kind of rotifer? The water sample was taken from a fresh water pond located in our subidivision. There were actually two of them swimming about in the same drop of water and their movements were reminiscent of an octopus (perhaps a quadapus?). :grin:

Any suggestions? Kind of a cute little guy...

#2 lightfever

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 08:10 AM

Interesting but it does sound more like a hydra than a rotifer. I've been trying to find a hydra in my koi pond but have not had any luck yet.

Hopefully someone here will know what it is, sorry I can't help.

#3 KennyJ

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 10:52 AM

I'm sure we've seen photos of rotifers posted here before.

Before we did, I thought a rotifer was some kind of gardening apparatus :-)

Kenny

#4 mmclure

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 06:52 PM

The most common rotifers (bdelloid) are pretty easy to recognize if you're observing a live specimen due to the apparent rotation (hence the name) of the corona around their mouth. If you saw a live specimen and nothing seemed to rotate I'd doubt it was a rotifer.

IMHO, live rotifers are the Orion Nebulas or Saturns of the microscopic world - always crowd pleasers.

#5 mmclure

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 07:02 PM

Well, I appear to be mistaken - there are many rotifers that don't follow the bdelloid mold, so it's possible that what you saw was a rotifer of some sort. There's a good index of rotifer pictures here - it looks like some of the Collothecidae family could look like what you describe.

I still think rotifers are some of the coolest microscopic creatures to observe :)

#6 Sgt

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 05:40 PM

Why are they called rotifiers? Silly q but do they rot dead organic stuff in ponds??

#7 mmclure

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 03:59 PM

Why are they called rotifiers? Silly q but do they rot dead organic stuff in ponds??


The most common rotifers (bdelloid) have two little crowns of cilia around their mouth - the cilia move to pull food into their mouth, and the motion makes the crown appear to turn - hence the name "rotifer" from "rotate". You can see what this looks like on this Youtube video.

#8 caheaton

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 10:58 PM

Hello, sorry I don't have an camera for the scope, but here's a rough sketch I made tonight. It does a fair job of outlining the guy's shape. The shaded area is a translucent green that tapers to clear. At 500x and above it was obvious that the entire body is covered with round raised structures, not just the limbs (stinging cells I'm assuming). The ridge running around the body is more of a channel and it seems to be able to flex his body a bit at that point. He can move the "limbs" but tonight he seemed to be moving around via some sort of water jet function as he would just suddenly start to move slowly in a straight line and then stop without any swimming motion being apparent. I agree he looks similar to some of the photos of Collothecidae, but none of them appeared to be an exact match.

Also, the front "limb" is squared off, like it's some sort of trunk while the rear appendages taper to points.

The guy sure is big, shows up easily at 40X and fills the view entirely at 800X with a wide angle ep!

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#9 azure1961p

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 09:49 PM

Looks potentially like crustacean larva. Quite so actually.

Pete

#10 JerryOrr

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 01:34 PM

Craig,

Whay you have there is a Dinoflagellet (mispelled probably).

Jerry






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