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Problem attaching cpc to tripod; taking too long.

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#1 vorttrof

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 11:31 AM

I have no problem positioning the hole at the bottom of the scope to the tripod. The problem is rotating the scope to align the other holes. It can take several minutes for the scope to drop into position. I just keep rotating and rotating it seems before it catches possibly as long as 10 minutes. It never did this the first couple of years with the scope. Anyone have similar issues or suggestions to remedy?

#2 junomike

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:18 PM

These are a little pricey, but work fantastic!

Landing Base

Mike

#3 Gastrol

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:29 PM

Once you have the scope mounted apply alignment marks

#4 HeyJP

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 01:06 PM

I have a new CPC 1100 so have only done this a couple of times so far, but what I found is that since the screws in the base are spring loaded to drop down, push up on one of the screws while you rotate and you'll feel it click in. Then you can screw the first in and the other two follow. As Gastrol suggests, mark it once you're there.

Jim

#5 rookie

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 05:09 PM

I have no problem positioning the hole at the bottom of the scope to the tripod. The problem is rotating the scope to align the other holes. It can take several minutes for the scope to drop into position. I just keep rotating and rotating it seems before it catches possibly as long as 10 minutes. It never did this the first couple of years with the scope. Anyone have similar issues or suggestions to remedy?


Are you rotating the upper part of the scope while the underside base remains still?

Place the scope over the center position pin on the tripod. Keep the clutch loose. There are 2 parts to the base, the upper silver control panel and arms, and the underside base that attaches to the tripod. They rotate free of each other when the clutch is loose. It's the underside that has the little feet that drop into the tripod base to then be secured with the bolts. You have to wrap your fingers around the outside rim of the silver base and grasp the underside, rotate them both together. You should only have to turn them both together a maximum 1/3 rotation to get the scope to set into the tripod. I've done it hundreds of times in the dark, eyes closed, it does not matter.

I've seen people keep the clutch tight to do this, but you can stress the gears with that method.

#6 katie

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 06:00 PM

I am impressed that you guys can move these things around so easily.

My CPC1100 fork was move once by me 4 feet(giving birth was easier), from a table to the tripod.....and stayed there until I got the HD Wedge Pro.

My son moved it to the wedge....and it stays there.

If I had to set the thing up every time I used it.....well...I would/could not use it.

You guys are truly dedicated....and in shape. :applause:

#7 yonkrz

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 06:23 PM

wrap your fingers underneath the bottom plate and hold as you turn,it will drop in within seconds,sounds like your making it harder than it really is. :smirk:

#8 HeyJP

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 06:32 PM

I've done it hundreds of times in the dark, eyes closed, it does not matter.


Now, you're just showing off!!

Jim

#9 oldstargazer

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 09:24 PM

Katie, I wish I had a place where I could leave mine setup. This is indeed a heavy beast, I am glad I work with heavy stuff all day to keep me in shape for my hobby.

#10 brianb11213

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 03:17 AM

I am impressed that you guys can move these things around so easily.

My CPC1100 fork was move once by me 4 feet(giving birth was easier), from a table to the tripod.....and stayed there until I got the HD Wedge Pro.

My son moved it to the wedge....and it stays there.

If I had to set the thing up every time I used it.....well...I would/could not use it.

You guys are truly dedicated....and in shape. :applause:

Ha! You should see me. Well, probably not.

Lifting the fork/tube assy of the CPC1100 is fairly easy. I store the thing on a bench set at about the same height as the tripod is in use. No back bend necessary. Wrestling the thing out of the box it came in was a job I would not happily do again.

I could not manage to mount the fork/tube assy onto a wedge on my own. I don't think I could handle the fork/tube/wedge assy. If I wanted a 11" SCT mounted equatorially I'd get a bare tube & stick it on a GEM - much easier to handle that way, and the tracking capabilities of every halfway serious GEM I've ever come across exceeds that of the CPC fork mount by a fair margin.

But I don't have the "slow attach" issue ... yet?

#11 vorttrof

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 05:13 PM

I will mark the alignment spots when in position and try that. I had thought about holding the two bottom pieces when rotating but I was not sure if I would stress some gears so I will try that. Pushing up one of the spring loaded screws is also a good idea. Back to the 30 second attachement I hope. thanks for the replies.

#12 Doc Bob

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 06:46 PM

Dermott,
The only way you can stress gears is when the clutches are tightened and then an attempt is made to move, rotate, or otherwise place stress against the clutches. When you get the scope/fork placed on the mount correctly, grab the base with your thumb "up" and your 4 fingers along the base ( the black disk that the silver piece with the computer plug-in ports reside), with the clutch loose - just rotate the fork assembly as mentioned previously - it will drop into the cut-outs in the base and then all you have to do is tighten the 3 screws on the mount (into the base) . . . should be only a couple of seconds to get things aligned.

Sorry for the redundancy,
Bob

#13 Radiostar

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 07:34 PM

I gotta wonder if you have the centre pin up too high. It is adjustable, maybe take it down a couple of millimeters. And the clutch should be tight enough that the whole base is turning, not just the top portion. I also find that the three bolts will sometimes bind and be very difficult to turn, rocking the scope slightly frees them up.

#14 Steve Daniel

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 11:36 AM

FWIW, right after I got my CPC800, I once had trouble getting it to seat. Turned out, since I had put the scope on the ground while setting up the tripod, a stick had gotten stuck in one of the indented recesses in the bottom of the base, preventing proper seating.

#15 DarthNebula

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 01:22 PM

I had a similar problem when I also first got my scope. Turns out it was the pin in the middle was too high and while it did eventually seat...it took awhile to get it to do so...I adjusted its height and all is well since!

#16 herrointment

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 05:18 PM

And a little work on the mounting bolts with a file will render that annoyance a distant memory.......and for the price paid shouldn't have to be done in the first place. There are a lot of niggling quality problems that seem to be the norm on the CPC series.

#17 Trombone

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 02:45 PM

I had a similar problem when I also first got my scope. Turns out it was the pin in the middle was too high and while it did eventually seat...it took awhile to get it to do so...I adjusted its height and all is well since!


Mine too, but you can adjust the height of the pin in the middle as it is threaded through the plate.

#18 skypilgrim

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:54 AM

Sorry - getting to this thread a little late...

BrianB quote, "Lifting the fork/tube assy of the CPC1100 is fairly easy. I store the thing on a bench set at about the same height as the tripod is in use. No back bend necessary. Wrestling the thing out of the box it came in was a job I would not happily do again."

As a prospective buyer of a CPC this is something I'm really trying to understand. How to lift the scope/fork unit onto the tripod. I've looked up the weights at the Celestron site:

8" - 43lbs
9.25" - 58lbs
11" - 65lbs

At first glance I think, "oh my, I wouldn't want to lift more than the 43lbs late at night in the dark". But then that limits me to 8". Hmm, somethings not right.

I keep seeing posts of folks handling the larger ones, "no problems".

I'm a reasonably fit fellow but also kissing 60 so I need to be sure it's something I can lift for many years ahead. I've looked at YouTube, Yahoo groups etc but can't find a video showing the technique of lifting these tube/fork units that makes them so easy?

Deadlifting a 65lb barbell is one thing, lifting a bulky and ding-sensitive scope onto a rather small tripod landing pad is another, right? How is it done? :confused:

Any tips are appreciated,
Sam

#19 Gastrol

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 12:19 PM

Due to the location of handles it is a lot easier to lift and carry the scope assembly than a 60lb bag of concrete.

#20 skypilgrim

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 12:54 PM

Thanks Gastrol,

So I see the handle on the right fork. Is the handle somehow underneath the HC sleeve on the left fork?

UPDATE: I found the users manual at the Celestron site and they say you hold the left side under the bottom of the fork arm. I understand now. Sorry for the sidetrack.
Sam

#21 7of 9

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 01:51 AM

I own a 11 GPS old model ( Steel ball bearings) I had the same problem with aligning the screws to the base. I call a old friend in Maryland, he immediately recommended a Starizona landpad. The moment I put it on my scope I drop the scope on the base, rotate the bottom of the scope you hear a click... done thread the screws on. You will have to buy longer screws, but it is the best investment you will make. Takes me 90 seconds and it's done!

try this link

http://starizona.com...er-Tripod-P1...

Good luck,
Rachel






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