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Optical and radio brightening of BL Lacertae

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#1 ZielkeNightsky

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 03:27 PM

Saw the Atel 4271 this evening.

Anyone following this exiting object?

Atel #4271

#2 NJScope

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 09:03 PM

Lars
Interesting objects, are there others within the light grasp of a small telescope?

#3 ZielkeNightsky

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 05:34 AM

Hi Kevin

While reading up on the BL Lac objects I found this very interesting paper "Photometric Analysis of the
Brightness Variation of AGN Cores, By Nicholas J. Long April 9, 2012"

In the paper there's 4-5 more of these objects.

He uses a small 8" newt, some very standard filter incl. a h-beta to do some interesting science.


Photometric AGN

The observations with the h-beta filter will only work en bright nearby Seyferts.

About BL Lacertae, I can see AAVSO have sent out an request for observations.
AAVSO req

#4 brianb11213

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 05:54 AM

The ones that come to mind as easily observable with modest aperture and are on the observing programme of the British Astronomical Association Variable Star Section are:

S5 0716 +71 (Cam): usually mag 13 or 14 and circumpolar for northern temperate latitudes

Markarian 421 (UMa): usually around mag 13. Somewhat difficult to observe visually due to nearby brightish star (Flamsteed 51).

Both of these show considerable variation if observed at intervals of a few days. They're more active than BL Lac usually is!

#5 NJScope

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 09:31 PM

Lars/Brian
Thanks for the info. I'll add these to the list of exotic targets (quasars etc) that I monitor when there's only an hour or so of decent weather to image.

#6 ZielkeNightsky

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 06:07 PM

Hi

The last couple of month I have worked on my photometric project on Blazars, and especially BL Lac objects.

So over the last couple of weeks I have tested my observatory set-up and some remote facilities. I have no problems with detecting the continuum variations with my own telescope and the remote facilities and it looks like I can detect variation in H-beta.

During the test on sep. 19 th. there was reports about huge variations on CTA 102, so I made some observations.

A graph from tonight shows the large jumps around sep. 20-22 and some minor variations over the last 48 hours.
Lightcurve CTA 102

So nice to have some results from my first photometric observations.

#7 Bill-in-BC

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 08:35 PM

Additional bright AGN's for the current observing season:
M77 (NGC 1068)
NGC 1275
NGC 7469

#8 ZielkeNightsky

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 12:36 PM

Thanks Bill


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