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Lx55 GEM

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#1 James Cunningham

James Cunningham

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 05:33 AM

Is the CNP always in the exact same place relative to where your are? I ask this because I set up my scope in the exact same position each time I go out. In fact, I have glued washers to my concrete driveway and the points of the tripod fit right into the washers. If I get a good polar alignment and then move the scope inside, when I come out again and the scope is facing the exact same position, will I still have a polar alignment? I would still do my usual 3 star alignment but do I still have to move the mounts adjustment? I could "Park" the scope before I shut down to make sure that it really was facing the exact same position. Thanks.
Jim

#2 Geo.

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 09:27 AM

CNP does not move, but the pole star does. I doubt that once moved your setup can be replaced with enough accuracy to maintain exact polar alignment, but your gotos should be fine.

#3 TALK2KEV

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 05:35 PM

James
I do the same thing I just use a black sharpie marker and if you haven't set up for a different observing site ie your Azimuth and Latitude hasn't been changed and your tripod is at the same height, you will be close just not nailed. This is also a good for a solar event and make it where you can set up your equipment in the day light. Just don't expect it to be great with out some more fine tuning.

#4 MawkHawk

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 07:09 PM

And the ground itself can move as it cools and warms or dries or gets wet.






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