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Help Finding NGC891

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#26 Photoner

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 09:12 AM

I "think" I saw this galaxy in my 12.5" the other night from a fairly LP backyard.

Study the star patterns in the photo and the flipped sketch above to learn the deep neighborhood of this tricky object.

Try various levels of squinting at the photo above to drop out some of the detail as it might appear visually though your scope with variable seeing & transparency conditions night to night.

#27 whirlpoolm51

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 03:19 PM

You could be staring right at this galaxy and you wouldnt see it!!! hahahaha i have seen it numerous times from my backyard with a 12"" and my 16" and the first time i tried looking for it i couldnt find it , only to realize the next day that i was in the correct field and staring right at it!!!

LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS MEANS MORE THAN MAGNITUDE in light polluted skies hahaha

So when looking for this little buggger , pan slowly and first make sure you are in the correct field and then use alot of AV haha

#28 Matt2003

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 07:08 PM


Averted imagination needed? My first sighting probably was. I know this thing is located at the bottom of that little parallelogram just east & south of Almach.
ALMOST.. Almost..
I had better luck ( though not the views of last October!) with Gamma Cygni & the nebulae around it. Of course, I only tried a broadband filter & my OIII (which showed notthing) there.
One night, 891. One night, you will be MINE!

Clear Skies,
Matt

#29 Achernar

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 10:47 PM

Here is a drawing I made of NGC-891 with a 10-inch, under the murky skies of the Gulf Coast.The dark lane is more apparent through my 15-inch than the 10-inch, but it's still definite in the smaller telescope.

Taras

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#30 Scanning4Comets

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 04:45 AM

Yep. It sure is a faint one indeed! This observation was with a 12.5" Orion DSE in 1997.

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#31 Bill Barlow

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 07:53 PM

I found this galaxy with my C14 while star hopping from M34. At our club's yellow site, it was faint with a noticeably brighter core region. It was also fairly large in the C14..overall a nice object to view.

Bill

#32 Matt2003

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 06:59 PM


I still wonder why Astronomy Magazine picked this one as one of the 100 Best DSOs, its surface brightness makes it much too tough to be an easy object to view.
I wonder how many times I am going to look right at this thing & not even see it. I must simply get to a decent dark site.

Clear Skies,
Matt

#33 starrancher

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 07:07 PM

I still wonder why Astronomy Magazine picked this one as one of the 100 Best DSOs, its surface brightness makes it much too tough to be an easy object to view.
I wonder how many times I am going to look right at this thing & not even see it. I must simply get to a decent dark site.

Clear Skies,
Matt


Yeah , no kidding .
:foreheadslap:

#34 Matt Lindsey

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 09:31 AM

I still wonder why Astronomy Magazine picked this one as one of the 100 Best DSOs, its surface brightness makes it much too tough to be an easy object to view.
I wonder how many times I am going to look right at this thing & not even see it. I must simply get to a decent dark site.


Well, that's 100 best, not 100 brightest. IMO it's easily in the 100 best DSO's. I never pass a chance to view it in the Fall. The dust lane really starts to pop at 150X in my 12" scope. Once you find it, it becomes pretty easy to locate after that. Get to at least a yellow zone (SQM 21.0) to see it well.

#35 blb

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 09:38 AM

Well, that's 100 best, not 100 brightest.


How true! Many of the best objects to view are not the brightest objects in the sky and so it is with NGC 891.

#36 Matt2003

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 06:45 PM


Yes, I know they did not mean brightest, as they had a few very challenging things on that list. However, I am mystified by their statements about it being one of the "best galaxies" for a 10 inch scope. REALLY? Hmm, not much more power than my 8 inch..
And they neglected to mention anything about the very challenging low surface brightness here, though they did with several other objects. Which has been the cause of my frustration over the last three years.

Clear Skies,
Matt

#37 Astrojensen

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 03:27 AM

However, I am mystified by their statements about it being one of the "best galaxies" for a 10 inch scope.



I'd say the statement is probably true under dark skies. Under light polluted ones? Not so much.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#38 Matt2003

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 07:04 PM


Which, again, is not mentioned. No "You will need to get to a blue-Black Zone to adequately see this object".
I feel slightly miffed. But not enough NOT to try again tonight, after the cold front has moved through! LOL

Clear Skies,
Matt

#39 starrancher

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 08:52 PM

Even in a blue zone it was barely detectable in my 5 inch .
Haven't tried it yet in the gray to black zone .

#40 cpr1

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 08:54 PM

I feel your pain Matt. It took me going to a yellow/green zone before I could make it out. It is large as far as edge on galaxies go and one side always seems brighter than the other. Almost like seeing only half the galaxy sometimes. This is in a 10 inch scope.

It is faint, so if the background is grayish and not black then that won't help. I think all of those top 100's are based on excellent skies.

In my 12 from home I can't see ngc 891, m33, m74, or m97. That's in a red zone or maybe worse.

#41 droid

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 08:21 AM

Any one out there know where one might find a telrad chart to print out for this object?

#42 bremms

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:08 PM

My backyard is red-orange and I tried with my newly cleaned C8. I really couldn't see it for a good while and I remebered from MANY years ago exactly where it is compared to the orange star nearby. Went back later and saw a hint of center maybe.... The C8 doesn't have great contrast. I used to spot in my 6" reflector from a green zone. It popped right out in my 10" with a Zambuto quality mirror. Back then it was closer to a blue site.

#43 mnev326

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 02:04 PM

I observed NGC891 for the first time this year on Tuesday night. My observing site is in an orange zone in New Jersey. The scope I was using was my 15in dob. I located it with my 27pan(70x), then I swapped to my 13ethos(146x). The transparency was above average. I could not make out the dust lane. In the past I've observed it with my 10in dob at the same site. If the transparency is not above average to excellent it is a no show.

Mark

#44 auriga

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 06:09 PM

[quote name="jack45"]Been looking for NGC891 for two years. Not sure I've found it as of yet. Is it located between the star Almach and M34? If not where from the star Almach should I look (north,south,east or west of Almach). How should it look in a 12" or 16" scope?

Reply:
Here is one way to find it:
It's 2/3 of the way from Almach to Algol and about a degree up. I can see it in reasonably dark skies but it isn't bright, it's possible to miss it. The photos of it make it look a lot brighter than is seems to me visually.
Bill

#45 Matt2003

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 06:23 PM


On the 17th I tried again. Could ALMOST call it, but not enough. YET...

Clear Skies,
Matt

#46 bremms

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 11:42 PM

Spotted it tonite in the C8 just barely.. I looked at the star patterns in the wider field pics and knew RIGHT where it was. Just came inside. Faint faint little streak/ smudge.

#47 Matt2003

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 02:15 PM


I know the field stars by heart now, it does not take me 2 seconds to get there. now seeing the Beast, well...

Clear Skies,
Matt

#48 Scanning4Comets

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 07:42 AM

Any one out there know where one might find a telrad chart to print out for this object?


Droid,

You'll need a much more detailed map to find NGC-891. I used a page from Uranometria 2000 and found it that way last week. It was very "ghostly" looking in my 10" and a lot easier to see in my friend's 16". I literally photcopied EVERY PAGE from Uranometria 2000 and put the pages into transparent page holders. I then use a small magnet to hold it to my metal scope tube and I turn the map to see field stars just like I see them in my low power 38mm Orion Q70 finder eyepiece until I reach the target. I then switch to higher power to inspect the object.

Good luck!

#49 Starman1

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Posted 22 October 2012 - 04:05 PM

NGC 891 was discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783 using a 4.2 reflector telescope. Walter Scott Houston could see it with his 4-inch refractor and Steven O'Meara has a great sketch of this galaxy using a 4-inch refractor in his Caldwell book. Yet some people have trouble seeing this galaxy with an 18-inch scope, Why? Is it any surprise that the reason is light pollution? To have your best chance of seeing this galaxy you will find that you need the darkest skies you can find or have access to. Although this galaxy is easy to find, it may never be seen with much light pollution present. So my suggestion is to stop looking for this galaxy at home until you have found it from a dark sky site. That way you will know exactly what you are looking for and where it is located among the stars in your eyepiece. Once you know what this faint object looks like and where it is located you may find that it is visible at home with a much smaller scope but it will be very faint.


Regardless of discoverer, my first view of this galaxy was in 1963-1964 with a 4.25" reflector. Thirty years later, I had no problem seeing it with a 4" SCT.
The key? Very dark skies (mag. 6.2+ in the first instance, 6.8+ in the second).
In my 12.5", it's magnificent--not only because of its size and details (like the central dust lane), but also because it is in a spectacularly rich field of stars. There are very few galaxies that are in rich fields, and that makes NGC891 worth the look.
I put its surface brightness higher than NGC247, but below that of NGC253, both of which are visible during October nights.
It goes without saying you should not try for this galaxy when there is Moon in the sky.

#50 Matt2003

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Posted 22 October 2012 - 06:59 PM


I found NGC 253 relatively easy in a 25mm EP on the 8XTi. Too much magnification seemed to make it invisible, but at 48X it was pretty large & almost obvious. So far, aside from M.31, my favorite Fall galaxy.
Some day, NGC 891, some day..

Clear Skies,
Matt






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