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ES Twilight II - 6" Achomat work ok on this?

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#1 Lane

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 10:38 PM

The Twilight II that Astronomics has on their showroom floor works well with a 5" ES on board. I moved it around over the weekend in the store and it seems to be very smooth. There is no backlash or jumpiness in the movement and it had very little vibration.

I have not used it or even seen it with a 6" scope. Can it handle the 6" without getting the shakes and without falling over.

#2 kwjohnson

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 05:59 AM

I can't address the 6" achro, but a couple weeks ago I shifted from a C6 to an C8 Edge on mine as my main scope. I found the C6 is beautiful with no counterweight, but added 7 lbs of an ADM counterweight with the C8 to keep the motion fluid and the feel matched in altitude and azimuth. The C8 with finder and eyepiece is about 15 lbs. Obviously also much shorter than an achro and less prone to shakes.

#3 Lane

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 01:50 PM

The 6" achro I have is almost as heavy as a C11 but it is also about 12" longer. Works fine on my CGEM mount but I was kind of hoping I could find a nice inexpensive alt-az set up to use with this scope. I guess the LX80 could handle it in ALT-AZ mode, maybe that is route I should go. I really wanted something simpler than that though.

#4 Pat at home

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 01:04 PM

Duo-T works well. A good tripod is the best way to reduce the shakes from any mount.

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#5 slyke

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 05:08 PM

Duo-T works well. A good tripod is the best way to reduce the shakes from any mount.


Pat,
Your counterweight configuration looks different from the Duo-T mount on the Canadian telescopes webpage. Can the 'stock' mount be configured this way?
-Stepeh

#6 tomharri

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 06:00 PM

Celestron C6R was too much for my canadian T, even with counterweights hanging off the side, tube too long. The 5" surplus shed f/9.4 achro is the limit for my setup, orion 1&3/4" steel leg tripod with 8" atlas ext. column.
Twilight mount is only good for 4" f/9's max. and 6" sct's or maks. They are just too lightly built. Look good in the pictures, just not in real life.

#7 Lane

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 01:10 AM

I am not sure the Twilight and the Twilight II are the same. The Twilight II definitely handles a 5" without the shakes, I have seen that first hand. But my 6" is a lot heavier that that 5".

That DUO-T looks beefier than the ES mount.

I wish the discmount dm6 was not so expensive, that looks like the best solution.

#8 Pat at home

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 11:07 AM

Duo-T works well. A good tripod is the best way to reduce the shakes from any mount.


Pat,
Your counterweight configuration looks different from the Duo-T mount on the Canadian telescopes webpage. Can the 'stock' mount be configured this way?
-Stepeh


Short answer -yes. The rather short counterweight shat is simply screwed in place. A little metal cap covers the threads at the horizontal position, remove it and screw the counter weight shaft into the threaded hole. Takes just a few seconds. The weights shown in my photo are from my EQ-6 with the centre bushing removed.






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