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Amazing Galaxies

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#1 PhilCo126

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 09:57 AM

We all know that IC1101 in the constellation Serpens is the largest galaxy (over 5 million light years across) astronomers have discovered so far...

Galaxies have always intrigued astronomers and the picture showing Galaxies NGC3314A and NGC3314B is amazing as it looks like these are colliding but in fact there're millions of lightyears separating them:
http://www.astro-pho...es/ngc-3314-hst
:shocked:

#2 rockethead26

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 10:08 AM

Stunning photograph!

#3 deSitter

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 07:39 PM

It isn't at all clear that these galaxies are far away from each other. Look at the star-forming knots (blue) in each - the same basic size more or less. That alone implies relative proximity. Look at the yellowish mid-regions and dust lanes - the same. Ignore the spiral behind and follow the lines of that in front - misshapen. These galaxies are clearly interacting - and yet none are so blind as those who WILL not see.

Tell me the galaxy in front is anything like normal!

http://apod.nasa.gov...14_keel_big.jpg

Here is one of the grand spectacles of nature, two galaxies with differing redshift that are clearly interacting, and yet the priestly class must genuflect. Put the telescope away Galileo, we refuse to look!

-drl

#4 deSitter

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 08:10 PM

Look here:

http://cseligman.com.../ngc33.htm#3314

Notice the small arcuate feature at 11 o'clock with three star-forming knots which bends backward against the grain of BOTH galaxies.

Look at the jumbled mess at the right edge.

Look at the opposite ends of the "rear" object, at 2 and 8 o'clock. Does that look like the opposite ends of a grand design spiral? NO.

WHY is something like this ignored? Why do science when you refuse to believe your own eyes??

My favorite stupidity in reference to this galaxy goes like this - indeed the foreground galaxy is disturbed, but this came from another galaxy. now nowhere is sight - not of course the one visible right next to it!! Can you believe anyone could say something like this??

The fact is - these galaxies have dramatically different redshifts and yet are next to each other, and that can never, ever be admitted. There is no difference in principle, or in effect, than the Inquisitors demanding that Galileo repent his errors.

-drl

#5 llanitedave

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 09:55 PM

Your link was broken, Danny. It's fixed now.

Maybe it's just me, but it doesn't look to me like the star forming regions of the two galaxies are the same size, nor do the brightest individual stars (at least the ones that recognizably belong to one galaxy or the other) appear to me to be equivalent in brightness. The background galaxy appears to me to have fainter features, although overall, being more condensed, it's brighter.

#6 deSitter

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 03:17 AM

What is the chance that two galaxies of similar size overlap in such a way that their centers are coincident?

This morphology is seen elsewhere, to a lesser degree - see Arp's catalog, e.g. Arp 299, 280 following.

-drl

#7 deSitter

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 06:48 AM

Well if you want a smoking gun, I found the smoke. This is so patently obvious that I find it astounding that it hasn't been mentioned. Look where the arrow is pointing in the image below. The star swirls of the "rear" galaxy pass right over the dark gas/dust clouds of the "front" one, interrupting it.

-drl

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#8 russell23

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:20 PM

In this case I think there is no interaction. Here is a better example of what you are talking about:

http://es.wikipedia....ivo:NGC1275.jpg

The dusty filaments in front of NGC 1275 have a redshift 3000 km s-1 greater than the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275. There can be no disputing this one because absorption lines have been detected which place the object in the foreground of NGC 1275.

Dave

#9 russell23

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:24 PM

There is also NGC 1232 and NGC 1232a. The smaller companion to the lower left is NGC 1232A and it has a redshift ~ 4000 km s-1 greater than NGC 1232. In this instance it seems very clear that the resolution of features is of the same scale.

Dave






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