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Aperture fever, when does it end?

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#1 apolloadama

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 06:32 PM

When does aperture fever end? 15"? 22"? 30"? Empty bank account? Grave? Never?

#2 DavidC

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 06:42 PM

It ends when you don't have any more money after paying for your house, utility bills, and all the other piddley other stuff you have to pay for every month. Saving 20.00 a month sounds do-able 'till you find a sale on ep's or any other astronomy related object.
David

#3 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 06:58 PM

It *can* end when you realize there's lots to see and enjoy in our celestial backyard which doesn't require a monstrosity of a telescope.

#4 Old Rookie

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 07:35 PM

It ends when you decide that climbing up and down a ladder, in the dark a couple hundred times a night, just isn't worth it.

#5 star drop

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 07:44 PM

Big, bigger, biggest! :whee:

#6 whirlpoolm51

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 07:50 PM

i say keep going as big as you can until you cant no more!!! hahaha seeing objects is awesome but seeing more and more detail is even better!!! and if i had a 40" scope i would walk up and down that ladder as many times as need to get those picture quality views with my own eye!!!

#7 *skyguy*

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 07:58 PM

It ends when you are observing with your 26" F4.5 dob at the top of a 12' ladder with wind gusts of +20 MPH and temperature below 20 degrees F ... and the scope is shaking as bad as you are! The 26 is gone now and I'm very happy with my 18" dob for visual and 12" SCT for imaging (from the comfort of a heated family room). I've also gotten into wide-field binocular observing ... something the old 26 couldn't do!

#8 dsohunter

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 07:59 PM

For me, >15 minutes setup/tear down

#9 GeneT

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 08:00 PM

For me, it ended due to the logistical hassle factor. The largest telescope I can easily move, set up, store and view flat footed is a 12.5 incher. Less than that was too small, larger and the hassle was too much a bother for me to overcome.

#10 whirlpoolm51

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 08:10 PM

I did like my 12'' orion xti alot!! it was so much more easier to set up than my 16" now and i didnt need a step ladder darnet!!!!

When i get older though and move to the atacama desert ( dreams do come true ahahaha) i am going to build my own observatory that permanetly houses a 45" starstructure telescope hahaha and i am going to make the whole thing moterized so i can just plop my butt down in a custom chair at the eyepiece and push a buttom to move me and the scope around hahahaha

#11 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 08:12 PM

It *can* end when you realize there's lots to see and enjoy in our celestial backyard which doesn't require a monstrosity of a telescope.


:waytogo:

Personally I enjoy viewing our corner of the universe with telescopes of all sizes... small and big... I am OK climbing ladders and I am OK kneeling in the dirt. I appreciate the capabilities of both small and large telescopes and understand that what is most important is what I bring to the eyepiece...

So, here is a question to ponder: Exactly what is "Aperture fever?"

Not long ago I acquired a 25 inch Dob... There was no fever about it. I never really considered the possibility of owning something that big but after my wife and I purchased own dream hideaway with reasonably dark skies, 4 acres of land and a big garage, I realized I was in a situation that was well suited to owning a large telescope. I casually kept my eye open for a year or two.. One day I was looking at the Astromart ads and saw a 25 inch at a very reasonable price...

I think of aperture fever as a dissatisfaction with smaller scopes, a driven need for bigger and better... A 10 inch is not big enough, I need a 15 inch... My attitude is a 60mm is good, a 16 inch is good...

Jon

#12 tezster

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 08:37 PM

Often times, hard limits which we don't have any direct control over dictates the maximum scope size one can own. It could be a set budget, or lack of space. So in that sense, circumstances -not personal desire- dictate the maximum scope size, so the choice becomes quite simple :)

#13 Jeff Porter

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 08:53 PM

A friend of mine told me that it does not matter how big your scope is, because you will always be looking at the faintest objects possible with your scope.

Hmmmmmm..... Maybe now I can see all five galaxies in Stephens Quintet now that I have...

-Jeff P

#14 george golitzin

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 09:52 PM

For me, it pretty much ends with my 18-inch, which is the largest scope I feel comfortable transporting. Only way I'd consider something bigger is if I had a permanent observatory in a dark location. The 18 shows so much detail on DSOs, I don't feel compelled to go bigger.

-geo

#15 mark cowan

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 09:57 PM


Some might say never...

Best,
Mark

#16 Jason D

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:10 PM

It ends after successful completion of AA classes

P.S. “AA” stands for "Aperture Anonymous"

“Hi, my name is John and I am Aperturolic”

#17 johnnyha

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:10 PM

"Hi John."

#18 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:59 PM

Many responses highlight external factors which impose limits, such as setup/teardown time, mass, rickety ladders, etc. But this doesn't necessarily address the *fever* itself, where the dissatisfaction with one's current aperture leads to the continued desire for bigger, even if impractical. A change in mindset is required to overcome this.

#19 ThreeD

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 12:58 AM

But I don't think it always comes from a true dissatisfaction with what one currently has -- it may simply be a desire to see more.

I still think the XT8i I started with is great but to be honest most of my viewing is with my LB16. While some part of me would love to own a larger scope, I know it won't likely happen. I could go a bit larger and stay within the weight and logistics limits I have with the LB16 if I bought the right scope but it wouldn't be within the budget range that would please my wife and thus is a non-starter. I guess what I'm saying is I have the desire to see as much as I have the means to achieve. I enjoy what I have knowing that it is a much larger scope than most will ever have but also knowing that their are some objects that are out of reach. None of this means that I can't or don't enjoy the views through my 8".

#20 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 06:49 AM

Many responses highlight external factors which impose limits, such as setup/teardown time, mass, rickety ladders, etc. But this doesn't necessarily address the *fever* itself, where the dissatisfaction with one's current aperture leads to the continued desire for bigger, even if impractical. A change in mindset is required to overcome this.

But I don't think it always comes from a true dissatisfaction with what one currently has -- it may simply be a desire to see more...

I guess what I'm saying is I have the desire to see as much as I have the means to achieve. I enjoy what I have knowing that it is a much larger scope than most will ever have but also knowing that their are some objects that are out of reach. None of this means that I can't or don't enjoy the views through my 8".


Again, it comes down to the question of what is aperture fever?

I realize that the limitations on what I see are my own skills and not the particular telescope I am looking through. I think this is the mindset that Glenn is referring to. A "hero": J Reynolds Freeman knocked off the Hershel 400 with a 55mm Vixen refractor. I see what people like Don Pensack and David Knisely do with their scopes and Glenn does with his homemade binoculars... From my point of view, seeing more is about developing my skills and developing my skills means looking more...

In my mind, there is a distinction between the emotion driven dissatisfaction that I think of as aperture fever and a calm appreciation of the virtues of aperture, these are two different animals...

Jon

#21 maltydog

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 07:11 AM

for me, it ends at 16 inch, unless i win the lottery and can have a permanent observatory with permanently mounted big boy scope.

the 16 (truss) is fairly quick and easy to setup by myself. i do have a small step stool (one step) needed for zenith viewing. i can see a lot with this scope. at this time i have no desire to go bigger. i use the wheel barrow handles and have a little ramp i roll it in and out of my suv.

#22 GOLGO13

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 07:15 AM

I think it really depends on one's situation. I find I'm very comfortable with my 10 inch dob. I don't want a scope that requires a ladder toward zenith...even a small one. Not that I won't look through a scope like this. I just don't want that for myself. A friend of mine had a 12.5 inch obsession which I felt was a really nice setup. I feel 12.5 F5 would probably be my ideal size scope. But I would certainly like to mooch off other folks with larger scopes.

I know I had some crazy good views through a 30 inch dob which didn't even have great coatings. My friend's 16 inch also was quite good. Premium optics can make a big difference. But, those are not for me in my current situation.

I have to admit though...I'm more than happy viewing with my 6 inch dob. I personally find 6 inches (reflector wise) to be the minimum aperture for observing DSOs. And I find 10+ is where things get really fun. Pair that with a small refractor and you are good to go.

#23 JayinUT

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 08:45 AM

I've found 14 to 15 is good for me unless something larger is in an observatory. For the field, I love a 14 and am anxious to get my new DobStuff structure. I look forward to pushing the scope and Zambuto mirror to see how much more detail and how faint I can go with what I have. I've spent my discretionary money from our budget and the focus is on saving so my wife and I can retire by 62 and 60. Thus my spending in the hobby is in line with that overall goal. For me, that is the key for curing aperture fever.

#24 RogerRZ

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 08:55 AM

For me, it ends when I do an honest assessment of how long it would take for the setup/takedown of a large dob to get old, and I give my head a good shake. I'm lazy.

#25 whirlpoolm51

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 09:24 AM

You could just replace apeture fever with dark sky fever!!!

If it wasnt for light pollution i do not think apeture fever would be much of a problem to some as it is these days. If i could walk out my back door every night to see the milky way and a a sky full of stars , i would still have my 4" starter refractor!!!!






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