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Remarkable exoplanets

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#1 PhilCo126

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 01:35 AM

http://www.eso.org/p...ments/ann12072/
Stay tuned…

:graduate:

#2 dickbill

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 09:49 AM

The 4 suns planet?
http://www.cnn.com/2....html?hpt=hp_t3

#3 PhilCo126

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:10 AM

After 20 years of exo-planetology (1992-2012) the nearest exoplanet was Epsilon Eridani b in the constellation Eridanus-River at a distance of 10,4 Lightyears. The most distant exoplanet was OGLE-2005-BLG-390L in Scorpius at a distance of 25000 Light years...
With the current rate of discoveries it won't take long for these statistics to be updated.
Great to see that exo-planetology is rising, a fascinating and exciting subject!

#4 dickbill

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:34 AM

Yes, all non-giant stars should have some planets, or planetoids left over from accretion. Therefore Proxima Centaury at about 4.5 ly should have some.

#5 ILikePluto

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 03:30 PM

You all might want to pull out your April 1991 issue of Astronomy....

#6 dickbill

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 04:06 PM

What happened then, the first exoplanet?

#7 gavinm

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 04:31 PM

Prediction that Alpha Centauri had exoplanets - astronomers in NZ (and other places) are using hi-res spectroscopy to search for planets around Alpha Centauri as we speak.

#8 ILikePluto

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 06:39 PM

See http://www.earthmaga...est-star-system .

#9 DarkSkys

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 07:04 PM

See http://www.earthmaga...est-star-system .


It would be great if there was a a habitable planet so close, we could actualy get there!

#10 gavinm

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 08:08 PM

Told you so ;)

#11 PhilCo126

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 02:37 PM

PH1 (Planet Hunters 1) a circumbinary exoplanet around KIC 4862625 binary system:
In fact a world with 4 stars at a distance of 4000 lightyears in the constellation Cygnus.
KIC stands for Kepler Input Catalog

Multi-planet system around star KOI-500:
Discovered by Kepler space telescope at a distance of 1100 lightyears in the constellation Lyra.
KOI stands for Kepler Object of Interest

Earth-sized exoplanet around Proxima Centauri B:
At a distance of 4.3 lightyears in the Southern constellation Centaurus.

#12 PhilCo126

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 12:42 PM

I can't believe this.
Although some exoplanets got nicknames (Bellerophon, Methuselah and Osiris), these were never used by professional astronomers as exoplanets are named after their host star followed by a b, c, d, and so on in order of discovery.
It might be confusing for some to see names such as Kepler-22b or WASP-17, exoplanets named after the research project... but i was amazed to see this:
http://betaclone.uwingu.com/

What's the IAU gone think about this? :p

#13 ColoHank

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:54 PM

It would be great if there was a a habitable planet so close, we could actualy get there!



So close, in this instance (Proxima Centauri), is only about 26.4 trillion miles. But it's a lot easier to say 26.4 trillion than it is to comprehend the immensity of that number. So, consider this: with the cruise control set at a steady 75 MPH, it would take my Toyota Highlander a bit more than 40 million years to make that trip. Got a faster vehicle in mind -- a much faster vehicle? Pick a realistic velocity and do the math.

#14 llanitedave

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 11:53 AM

We're obviously not interested in realistic velocity. We want to get there fast!

We need Ludicrous speed!

#15 DarkSkys

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:03 AM

We're obviously not interested in realistic velocity. We want to get there fast!

We need Ludicrous speed!

-TV ad guy voice-
Realistic velocitys got you down? Not able to make it to your grandma's dinner party on 232 Zeta Aquaria within the next century?


You need to travel on,relativistic velocity Spacelines, the only sure fire way to get were your going and still be theoreticaly alive when you get there.

:D

#16 PhilCo126

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 11:59 AM

Check Project Dadaelus, pioneered by the British Interplanetary Society in the 1970s. Their design could reach speeds up to 12% of the speed of Light, so the closest stars could be reached within 4 decades... Mankind can do this but there're other priorities right now.

Check
http://en.wikipedia....roject_Daedalus
and the newly established Institute for Interstellar Studies
http://www.i4is.org/

:graduate:

#17 dickbill

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 12:22 PM

Robots with improved artificial intelligence could be build to reach 'lifespan' of tens of thousand of years. Perhaps they could be made with materials that don't degrade easily, like Platinums or Zircons in addition to self maintenance capabilities.
A thousand year long trip to a nearby star wouldn't look so long anymore, at least for them. Perhaps the theory of quantum computing will have made progress and these intelligent space probes could carry some sort of quantum computer entangled to a computer left on Earth and capable to transmit informations between each other instantaneously.

Travelling interstellar distances doesn't seem impossible for life 'in silico'.

#18 ColoHank

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:37 PM

I have to wonder what a probe would do once it reached the nearest star system. It's possible that Earth-based or Earth-orbiting sensing systems will have progressed so much before then that we'll be able to determine what we want to know about a distant star's exo-planets without a protracted inter-stellar mission. For such a probe to have any value, there'd have to be some folks on hand for decades or even centuries after launch to provide mid-course upkeep and to interpret the data a probe might send back upon arrival. I'd think that's a pretty ambitious and optimistic commitment given our short attention spans and penchant for instant gratification.

#19 Jarad

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:46 PM

In order to work, we would have to develop AI's to the point that they could be making such decisions on their own, without relying on us carbon-based home-bodies. As to what they would do when they get there, if we want to colonize other worlds we would stock the ship with enough genetic info and starting material for bacteria, plants, animals, and us to "fertilize" a suitable planet if they find one.

Jarad

#20 dickbill

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:17 PM

Yes Hank, i also think so.

Anyways, the new planets in Alpha Centauri hasn't change the rating in this site:
http://phl.upr.edu/p...planets-catalog

Alpha CentauriB b is rated non habitable, too hot
http://phl.upr.edu/p...tstarisemerging

So Gliese 581 g in Libra is still the champion of habitability.
Personnaly i don't agree with a classification that ignores the distance to the star, and therefore that ignores the revolution period. 32 days for Gliese581g! to me it's a death sentence. They just assume that being closer to a fainter star is the same as being further to a brighter star? What about solar storms, solar winds, radiations, magnetism?

#21 llanitedave

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:11 PM

For the same amount of technology development, I think we could develop sensor systems within the solar system that will give us significant detail of nearby exoplanets. With that information we can decide at our leisure whether to visit and what kind of probes we should develop.

I'm all for conducting the searches and learning what we can with what we have, but my first priority would be mastering and colonizing our own solar system before we try to expand to others. If we do that, we'll have 90% of the infrastructure we need already in place.






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