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problem with new CPC1100.please help.

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#1 snowboycosmos

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:02 AM

hello there CN's
i recently bought a CPC110
and noticed a mist patch of the inside of the corrector plate.
this mist patch has not gone away and looks to me more like mildew or mould. i am including photographs for you to look at.
the spots are on the outside of the corrector plate but the 'nebula' is on the inside. what should i do? should i ask it to be sent back ? i spent about £2400 on the scope so its not small money... any advice /help would be appreciated.SBC

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#2 snowboycosmos

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:06 AM

photo 2

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#3 snowboycosmos

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:07 AM

photo 3

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#4 snowboycosmos

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:09 AM

photo 4

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#5 mclewis1

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:23 AM

Since your scope has a fastar secondary holder the simplest thing to do would be to unthread and remove the secondary mirror and clean the "nebula" using the standard corrector cleaning solutions (some diluted Windex and filtered and distilled water with lint free cleaning cloths and maybe some popsicle sticks). For instructions on the cleaning part have a look at http://www.arksky.org/asoclean.htm

Work slowly, keep the corrector vertical or tipped forward so nothing runs or drops back onto the primary, and have some patience as it may take a few sessions to completely remove it. You'll also probably need to practice the rinsing process a bit to ensure no streaks are left.

Most of all just relax and takes things slow ... this is a very minor issue.

#6 snowboycosmos

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 07:57 PM

Phew thanks Mark. I had a sigh of relief when I read that. Good idea to clean it removing the faster. I'll get into the project right away ! Many thanks sbc

#7 Koen Dierckens

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 01:04 PM

Looks like your corrector captured a mini-M1 on its surface. :-)

Be gentle when trying the cleaning process... If the scope really is brand-new and you can drive back to the store where you bought it, I'd consider bringing it back so they can take care of it. In case you bought the scope online and returning it to the store would include shipping and stuff, you might try cleaning the mirror yourself.

#8 snowboycosmos

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 11:14 PM

the link doesn't give any clear direction on how to clean the inside of the corrector plate via the fastar opening. Is this something I should attempt? I've just bought a brand new CPC1100 and now I have Cowan the inside of it?????

#9 mclewis1

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 01:10 AM

No, there's no specific info on cleaning the inside of the corrector this way. You're going to be winging it but basically by removing the secondary mirror you're opening a reasonably sized hole in the center of the corrector. Then it's just a matter of reaching in and cleaning the inside surface. From your pictures the schmutz is not too far from the center so it should be relatively easy to reach with just your fingers.

The alternative is to remove the entire corrector (lots of instructions around for that) but that's a much more involved process that requires you return the corrector to the exact location when you replace it to maintain the optical characteristics of your scope.






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