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What is your challenge object for this winter...

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#26 David Knisely

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:35 AM

Flaming Star nebula IC 405 in Auriga. G and H in the trap. Simeis 147 in Auriga. I've kind of given up on the Witch head until I get to darker skies.


The brighter parts of IC 405 should be doable under a fairly dark sky in a 12 inch if you use an H-Beta filter and at least possible using a narrow-band nebula filter. It isn't much, but the H-Beta at least should give you a fighting chance at seeing it. I can see several of the inner filaments in IC 405 in my 14 inch with the H-Beta (52x), but they are pretty darn dim. On a really dark night in an 8 inch f/5 equipped with the H-Beta, I have occasionally seen the very faint band of nebulosity that is west and extends well south of AE Aur (1.3 degrees in length). Good luck and clear skies to you.

#27 Feidb

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 10:02 AM

Buddy,

You are right. Filters don't do a thing for the Witch Head. With my 16", the field is way too narrow, that's why I went for just a chunk, an edge at one of the brightest spots but no dice. Too close, too small an area, even at 38X, my field of view just isn't wide enough to grab enough sky. This is a case where smaller may be better like you say.

#28 uniondrone

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 05:20 PM


The Flame Nebula from an orange zone would be my challenge. Not sure if it is doable, though.

#29 jeff heck

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 05:52 PM

I am in the hunt for the G and H stars in the trap, NGC 7635 Bubble Nebula, along with getting a decent view of NGC 1365. I have next week off and plan on a few dusk till dawn sessions, so wish me clear skies! :praying:

#30 David Knisely

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:55 PM

Buddy,

You are right. Filters don't do a thing for the Witch Head. With my 16", the field is way too narrow, that's why I went for just a chunk, an edge at one of the brightest spots but no dice. Too close, too small an area, even at 38X, my field of view just isn't wide enough to grab enough sky. This is a case where smaller may be better like you say.


Well, actually a good broad-band LPR filter has been known to help enhance the Witch Head nebula in rich-field telescopes. It isn't much of a boost, but every little thing can help here. I have seen the Witch Head (barely) in a good pair of 10x50 binoculars under a very dark winter sky, but it wasn't all that prominent. All I could really see was a brightening of the sky background rather than something with detail. It was a tad easier to notice in my 100mm f/6 refractor at 15x with the Lumicon Deep-sky filter than it was in the binoculars, but it still was kind of a marginal object. Clear skies to you.

#31 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:53 PM

I've also bagged IC 2118 with a refractor, my 101mm f/5.4 Tele Vue, and a 35mm Panoptic. It was an exceptionally good night.

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#32 Old Rookie

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 08:26 AM

Einstein's Cross in Pegasus. A buddy and I have tried several times the last couple of years without success. Our mirror was upgraded this year to 36" from 31" and fabricated by Mike Lockwood. We're hoping this is the year.

#33 killdabuddha

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:35 AM

What is your challenge object for this winter...

Challenge object 38; Herbig-Haro 222 - The waterfall feature.

Steven


Wow. That waterfall feature is beautiful.

#34 drbyyz

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 10:06 AM

After about a 5 year hiatus of not doing so much observing due to not having my scope with me, I'm getting started back up again and my challenge for this winter is to revisit the Messier Objects. I figure that will be a good start to get me back into the groove. Bagged 27 on the first night out with the scope last night. Looks like M74 is going to be my short term challenge, no luck with it last night, will probably need a darker site to have a chance.

#35 allnight16

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 12:06 PM

Witch Head & the Pup

#36 Starboat

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 12:08 AM

We spied the witch's head last winter, and it is a unique, faint object. We encountered it in a 30" reflector on a good night in west Texas, and were surprised to also see it through binoculars as well. I would describe it as a streak of brightness, with no form and difficulty defining the edges of it. Einstein's cross is on my to see list.

#37 Old Rookie

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 09:58 AM

11/16/12. Mid-Ohio, temp 35 degrees, clear, transparency poor/fair, dew getting heavy.

Tried for Einsteinss cross in the club's 36" last night. We located PGC 69457 without issue. First eyepiece was a 17mm Nagler at 336x - nothing. Next up was a 12mm Nagler at around 500x - nothing. The galaxy was looking better. Next was a 5mm Nagler at 1,143x. Just maybe saw something - a brightening on the southern edge of the galaxy with averted vision - probably 60-70% of the time.

We had the telescope about 20 minutes east of the meridian so this was almost as good as it was going to get for the night. If this object is visible at all in amateur instruments, then transparency has to be just about perfect.

#38 J Lowrey

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 01:30 PM

John,

I have seen all four components of the cross at the same time once after many many attempts with my 48" F/4. It was two years ago and what I did was to keep at it till I got a dry transparent night with Sub Arc seeing. I used A ZAO II 6MM eyepiece at 813X. Most people do not realize just how small the core of CGCG 378-15 is. Good luck and keep at it I am sure your night will come around.

#39 David Knisely

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 01:58 PM

11/16/12. Mid-Ohio, temp 35 degrees, clear, transparency poor/fair, dew getting heavy.

Tried for Einsteinss cross in the club's 36" last night. We located PGC 69457 without issue. First eyepiece was a 17mm Nagler at 336x - nothing. Next up was a 12mm Nagler at around 500x - nothing. The galaxy was looking better. Next was a 5mm Nagler at 1,143x. Just maybe saw something - a brightening on the southern edge of the galaxy with averted vision - probably 60-70% of the time.

We had the telescope about 20 minutes east of the meridian so this was almost as good as it was going to get for the night. If this object is visible at all in amateur instruments, then transparency has to be just about perfect.


Einstein's Cross is located almost dead-center in the lensing galaxy, so you won't see it if you are looking towards the galaxy's edge. The galaxy is a barred spiral with a faint star-like nucleus and it is that nucleus which you should be looking at all the time at as high a power as the seeing will permit. In a 25 inch Obsession at the Nebraska Star Party, we did manage to get about three of the components, but it took great seeing to do this. Much of the time, all we saw was a blobby fuzzy version of the galaxy's star-like nucleus, as the seeing never fully settled down consistently. All the components are somewhat fainter than the central one (the nucleus of the galaxy). Below is a sketch I did of what we saw when the seeing settled down. Clear skies to you.

Attached Files



#40 KidOrion

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 02:31 PM

I'd be doing amazingly well just to see the galaxy, I think. Anyone know a minimum aperture for PGC 69457 in a green zone with typically mediocre seeing? (Loaded question, perhaps.)

#41 Bill Weir

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 03:24 PM

I'd be doing amazingly well just to see the galaxy, I think. Anyone know a minimum aperture for PGC 69457 in a green zone with typically mediocre seeing? (Loaded question, perhaps.)


12.5" from essentially the conditions you describe except good seeing. I located the galaxy with my 12.5" on the observing pad at the school observatory before going into the dome and giving the Cross a shot with the totally manual eq mounted 25". With the 25" at 635X (5mm T6 Nagler) I had strong suspicions of one component so I put a 10mm eyepiece into a 2,5X Powermate (793X) and was clearly able to detect 2 dots about 75% of the time. With my 20" in early Sept I was able to replicate this feat under better conditions using a 7mm UO HD in the 2.5X Powermate for 688X I think this is totally a seeing dependant object. If you don't have the ability to up the magnification then it won't happen.

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#42 KidOrion

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 12:08 AM

Thanks, Bill--I'm currently using a borrowed 12.5, so I'll have to give this a shot. I know I won't pick up the Cross, but seeing the galaxy is still a worthy goal, especially since I've mentioned Einstein's Cross at a club meeting and I'd be able to say I'd seen the "host" galaxy.

#43 Old Rookie

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 09:03 AM

Thanks for the comments on Einstein's cross gentlemen. I really appreciate the experienced guidance you offer up to those of us that are new to this hobby.

My buddy and I have the tools to nab this object. The only variables seem to be the transparency and seeing. Sooner or later we'll get this.

#44 Old Rookie

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 11:35 AM

Thanks for the comments on Einstein's cross gentlemen. I really appreciate the experienced guidance you offer up to those of us that are new to this hobby.

My buddy and I have the tools to nab this object. The only variables seem to be the transparency and seeing. Sooner or later we'll get this.


I re-read some of your comments and mine about the core of that galaxy. My thought is that, this is what I was catching with averted vision. Neither the seeing nor the transparency was very good that night. Thanks again.

#45 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 01:15 PM

I've seen three of the arcs of Einstein's Cross through a 32" ATM Dob at a very dark site. A few other observers saw all four. The magnification used was around 800x.

Dave Mitsky

#46 kcolter

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:15 AM

I would welcome reports from observers who have seen the G and H stars in the trapezium and what atmospheric conditions they feel are necessary to see them, are they more seeing dependent or transparency dependent (or both.) Thanks. Steven, with regard to the waterfall feature of HH 222, is this something one can realistically have a chance of seeing with large aperture amateur Dob? Are there any filters that would be of value for this target? Thanks!

#47 Feidb

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:03 AM

I've caught the G and H stars in the Trapezium in my 16-inch. Nights were very stable, but can't remember transparency. I think it was the stability above all that was key because magnification was up there. When it's in the 220X to 390X range which is when I saw it, if the atmosphere is not cooperative, it spreads the stars out and blurs everything. Those tiny dots blend into the background nebula and they disappear. That one night I remember, it was stable, super clear and I just spotted them but even then it was tough. The background brightness of the nebula makes it harder. There is no black background for contrast.

#48 Darren Drake

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:01 AM

How dark were your skies when you picked out G and H? Do you think dark skies are necessary since it is already in bright nebulosity??

#49 Feidb

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 01:22 PM

I don't remember if darkness was as much an issue as clarity. However, darkness goes hand in hand with that as if there is a lot of junk up there to affect the darkness and scatter light, the clarity won't be there either. A little haze might help for settling down planetary viewing but for seeing something like this, I don't think so. Since I'm not really a planetary guy, I wouldn't swear by that though I've seen some of my best views of the planets when there was a slight haze.

#50 michiel

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:43 AM

Guess mine is the most wanted : The horsehead






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