Jump to content


Photo

Almaak 2012 11 09

  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#26 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 263
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:26 PM

Hey, Stray, thanks for humoring this thread and giving two quality outings to the observation.


No, Jason, thank YOU. This Almaak survey was just the diversion that I needed after repeated failed attempts at splitting 33 Orionis for the Haas Project. Frustrating to say the least.

After doing some research, I've come to the conclusion that it is not my equipment nor my seeing/transparency conditions.

The problem lies in definite lack of observational skills on my part. I'm using a 90mm refractor. Someone else has apparently split it with an 80mm. I'm thinking that I just do not know what I am looking for or how to look for it. This is not an easy split for me.

Am I ready to call it quits? Heck no! Did we call it quits when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?

:grin:

-stray-

#27 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8246
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:58 PM

:rofl2:

NO! We did not quit! We declared war on France!

#28 Chopin

Chopin

    Canis Insanus

  • *****
  • Posts: 4585
  • Joined: 03 Feb 2005
  • Loc: In the doghouse.

Posted 18 November 2012 - 10:11 PM

Just thought I'd post my very quick impressions of tonight's observation, which lasted possibly 10 minutes. For the grab n' go session I used my 72mm ED doublet with a 4mm 50ยบ eyepiece, giving me a magnification similar to my previous observation. What I noticed immediately was the same rich blue that I recorded in the first session. But after paying close attention to the color for a solid 5 minutes the blue faded, until it remained as a "pale icy gray". I wonder if the first view of the star was assisted by my just coming from the lit house. And once dark adaptation began it may be possible that the colors washed away. Likewise, the orange tint in the primary star faded to a dull gold. It's just a hunch. Call it physiological speculation. Anyhoo, here is a sketch of the evening's observation, complete with dancing diffraction rings. The sketch closely approximates how the colors appeared by the end of the session.

Posted Image

#29 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 263
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 19 November 2012 - 03:38 AM

Jason,

Yes! You got it!

Fantastic diffraction rings. How did you achieve the effect?

:grin:

-stray-

#30 mikesemmler

mikesemmler

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 413
  • Joined: 01 Jun 2009

Posted 19 November 2012 - 03:46 AM

what a fine scetch - Jason. Observing double stars is one of the finest things on our firmament

Michael

#31 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8246
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 19 November 2012 - 04:40 AM

Nicely done, Jason. Pale icy grey is a good description, and your diffraction patterns are quite good looking.

There are some complex things that go in in the eye when changing from rods to cones. I don't know what those changes are, others can speak to that. Maybe you know the physiology. I kind of trust the eyes to react properly given the stimulation.

#32 Chopin

Chopin

    Canis Insanus

  • *****
  • Posts: 4585
  • Joined: 03 Feb 2005
  • Loc: In the doghouse.

Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:51 AM

Jason,

Yes! You got it!

Fantastic diffraction rings. How did you achieve the effect?

:grin:

-stray-


Thanks, Stray. :cool:

The effect was a combination of transparent layers in Photoshop.

Built from the ground up:

Layer 1 - third (outside) ring painted yellow, with green filter applied to left side and red filter applied to right side to mimic the "not perfectly apo" qualities of my 72ED refractor at 0.7mm exit pupil.

Layer 2 - slightly smaller black circle painted for separation.

Layer 3 - second ring painted yellowish gold.

Layer 4 - slightly smaller black circle painted for separation.

Layer 5 - first ring painted pale orange.

Layer 6 - slightly smaller black circle painted for separation.

Modified transparency of each individual ring layer to fade from center.

Merged layers 1-6.

New combined ring layer - used a soft eraser to create randomly sized radial spikes. New ring layer mimics the "dancing spikes" seen in refractor at small exit pupil.

Layer 7 - Painted primary star yellow.

Adjusted transparency of "dancing spikes" layer to reveal primary star without full distraction.


Repeated for companion, but with fewer layers.


FWIW, creating with layers in the finished sketch is what I enjoy most. A drawing program with layers gives extreme control over a finished sketch and enables you to kill and/or fix a layer individually without ruining the work you have put into the remainder of the illustration. I know, it's obsessive. That's how my mind works. :crazy:

#33 Chopin

Chopin

    Canis Insanus

  • *****
  • Posts: 4585
  • Joined: 03 Feb 2005
  • Loc: In the doghouse.

Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:56 AM

what a fine scetch - Jason. Observing double stars is one of the finest things on our firmament

Michael


Thank you for the kind words, Michael.

Double stars truly reveal a unique side to observing. It has been a learning experience where I can appreciate the effects of atmospheric seeing more readily than ever before. The beauty of the colors, the challenge of the resolve...I will not hesitate to find new subjects.

#34 Chopin

Chopin

    Canis Insanus

  • *****
  • Posts: 4585
  • Joined: 03 Feb 2005
  • Loc: In the doghouse.

Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:57 AM

Nicely done, Jason. Pale icy grey is a good description, and your diffraction patterns are quite good looking.

There are some complex things that go in in the eye when changing from rods to cones. I don't know what those changes are, others can speak to that. Maybe you know the physiology. I kind of trust the eyes to react properly given the stimulation.


I understand it minimally...possibly just enough to BS my way through a conversation. :lol:

#35 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7064
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier County, WV 38N, 80W

Posted 19 November 2012 - 02:36 PM

Jason,

I've been trying to get a chance to read this thread for several days now--meanwhile it keeps getting longer. :) Very nice sketchwork (you, too Stray) and well executed. BTW, in your original post the companion looks blue on my monitor. If the seeing was Ant V for your second sketch, there's no telling what color you saw.

I just stumbled across a double when I made my sketch of M1. I was looking for a nearby star to tweak my focus and happened upon a close binary called Struve 742. You might want to check it out. It's in Taurus.

No doubt you already know, but Jeremy Perez has much valuable info about double star sketching on his Belt of Venus website. :cool:

#36 Chopin

Chopin

    Canis Insanus

  • *****
  • Posts: 4585
  • Joined: 03 Feb 2005
  • Loc: In the doghouse.

Posted 19 November 2012 - 06:40 PM

Thank you, Michael. I've perused Jeremy's site a few times, but never payed close enough attention to his double work. I will need to visit. Much appreciated! :cool:






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics