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Herschel 400

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#1 garyp1936

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 08:03 PM

As one who is starting the Herschel 400 with an SE8, I wonder how much "easier" (or improved viewing) would the Herschel 400 be in a 10" dob than an 8" SCT? Would the 10" give significantly improved viewing? Or would one need to increase the dob size to 12"?

#2 vsteblina

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 08:51 PM

It gets easier as the size of the telescope increases and if you have dark skies.

We did the H400 in about a year. Using a 17.5 and 12.5 Dobs. We also had digital setting circles and a very dark site 30 minutes from the house and another observatory at the house in suburban skies.

I would start with at least a 12 inch. Save the more difficult objects for a 16. Enjoy the ride it just may take you longer to complete the list.

For three of us we tried to complete the list as quickly as possible. Good thing.....we lost one to a brain tumor.

There were three of us. One punched the DSC and moved the telescope while the another looked through the eyepiece. The third took the first set of notes and then everybody got a chance to view the object.

Best night was over 100 objects.

#3 AdirondackAstro

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 08:58 PM

Vladimir you had a great process going for finding them all. Sorry to hear about your loss.

#4 JayinUT

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 09:16 PM

I started the H-400 with a 10 inch dob and it was workable. The 10 inch worked better at true dark site(s) in giving structure and detail in those objects that give detail. I later went up to a 14 inch dob and that helped a lot more, aperture does rule. A 12 inch at a dark site would work great. You could probably use a 12 inch at home if your not in too heavily light pollution. I posted in the Stellar Media section an Excel spreadsheet I made based on Stephen O'Meara's suggested target list for keeping track of what objects you observe. I took just over 2 years to finish this and found the pace enjoyable.

#5 cliff mygatt

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 09:28 PM

I did the entire Herschel 400 with my 8 inch SCT. I went up to a 12 inch dob and am now pursuing the HII list. Good Luck!

#6 David Knisely

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 01:14 AM

As one who is starting the Herschel 400 with an SE8, I wonder how much "easier" (or improved viewing) would the Herschel 400 be in a 10" dob than an 8" SCT? Would the 10" give significantly improved viewing? Or would one need to increase the dob size to 12"?


I did the entire list with an 8 inch f/7 Newtonian way back in the mid 1980's without too much trouble. A larger aperture might make things a little easier, but in point of fact, if you like a challenge, the whole list has been done with a considerably smaller aperture. Clear skies to you.

#7 Bill Weir

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 02:24 AM

If what you own presently is an 8 inch scope then I think you should do the H400 with that scope. I believe that what you will gain in observing skill out of that task is immeasurable. If/when you get a scope with more aperture you will see so much more. It will be even more than what you would see if you got that larger scope now. Besides, then you will be one of those people who answer the question, "will I be able to do the H 400 with a 10 inch scope?", with, "10 inch, heck I did it with an 8 so with a 10 it should be a piece of cake". ; )

Really though it will all depend on where you intend on chasing this list. If the sky is dark enough then as said, much smaller apertures have completed this list but that was by very experienced observers.

Me, I have seen most of the H400 (including NGC 6118 and NGC 6540) with my 6 inch dob. As I now work on the entire H2500 using my 12.5 and 20 inch scopes I find any that are on the H400 list to be extremely obvious while many of the others don`t always stand out.

So as I previously stated, just get on with it with what you`ve got. 8 inches is more than enough to get the job done and in the end you will be a better observer for it.

Bill

#8 edwincjones

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 07:52 AM

I did it wtih 25x150 binoculars-with the help of dark skies

I would suggest starting with your 8", get as many as you can,
and move up in size if necessary

edj

#9 dennyhenke

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 02:36 PM

I just started this one last week and have been greatly enjoying it with my 8"! I'm hoping to build an observing deck and a 16" Dob this spring so I'll just revisit them all then!

#10 Ed Wiley

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:45 PM

I think o'Meara did the list with a 4" refractor and really dark skies. I say go for it. I wussed out and did mine with a 12.5" dob, it would have been more of a challenge with my 8" SN.

Ed

#11 killdabuddha

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 06:01 PM

I think o'Meara did the list with a 4" refractor and really dark skies. I say go for it. I wussed out and did mine with a 12.5" dob, it would have been more of a challenge with my 8" SN.

Ed


He did. And the occasional Barlow. Not too shabby for a self-professed lunar/planetary observer. Sure, it was an old TV f/5 Genesis refractor, usin a 22mm Pan, 7mm Nagler, and 4.8mm Nagler. And a 1.8x or 3x Barlow for some planetary nebulae, plus a sturdy Gibraltar mount. But as he also notes, the members of the Ancient City Astronomy Club designed the list for 6" reflectors and up under somewhat light-polluted skies. Otherwise, he reckons his equipment/conditions (from Kilauea for the project) to be about what one can expect from an 8-10" SCT under suburban skies.

I'd say yer about as ideally situated as you can be for the task, even from a purist's vantage point. Couldn't have dialed it in better if you'd tried!






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