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Veil & North American Nebula with an ST80

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#1 tnakazon

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 10:05 PM

Was able to pick up the Veil and North American Nebula with my Orion ST80 using a 32mm Plossl (12.5X magnification) and a Thousand Oaks OIII filter at an orange zone site (Malibu). For the Veil, I was able to get both ends and Pickering's Wisp in the same FOV. The OTA is mounted on a Vixen Mini-Porta alt-azimuth mount (only 6.5 lbs).

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#2 curiosidad

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 09:07 AM

Hello,
How interesting observations!
You could see the shape of the entire North America Nebula?
What field covers the 32mm eyepiece Ploss?
A greeting and congratulations ...

#3 cliff mygatt

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 09:33 AM

I did the same thing in my 120mm F5 a few years ago. The wider fields allow viewing the entire nebula and it is quite lovely.

#4 GlennLeDrew  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:48 AM

This configuration is much like one-half of a 12X80 binocular, although performing somewhat better, especially with the filter installed. But from a dark site and using this size bino, even without filtration all these objects--except perhaps Pickering's Wisp--can be seen well. By using both eyes, low contrast objects are made more definite.

And if the bino can have your desired filters installed, so much the better! My home made right angle bino in 20.8x60 mode, with Orion Ultrablock filters and the huge 4.7 degree field, have inspired others to exclaim that the presentation of larger nebulae is better than provided by most any cyclopean telescope.

My own observations of the Cygnus nebulae, also in the filtered 13X50 mode (7.7 degree FOV), have readily ferreted out the Pelican. several patches of the gamma Cygni complex, NGC 6888 and Sh2-101. Two-eyed viewing is potent.

#5 curiosidad

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 12:14 PM

Glenn,
In your opinion, then we could say that these two instruments are equivalent for these observations?
I mean, for observations of large nebulae, binoculars approx. 12X80 from areas with dark skies and short focal length refractor 80mm (ST80 for example) with narrowband filter from polluted area?
Best

#6 ensign

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 12:24 PM

I had similar results using my Equinox 80 with a Pentax 40 XL EP and an Orion OIII filter. With a huge exit pupil (6.4mm) dimming caused by the filter is not an issue.

I imagine, as Glenn says above, that having such a scope (in this case 12.5 x 80) for each eye would produce amazing views.

#7 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 01:27 PM

I've seen both nebulae many times through my filtered Orion ST80 and 101mm Tele Vue refractors from dark sites.

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#8 tnakazon

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 10:26 PM

Hello,
How interesting observations!
You could see the shape of the entire North America Nebula?
What field covers the 32mm eyepiece Ploss?
A greeting and congratulations ...

Couldn't get the entire North American Nebula in the FOV with the 32mm Plossl, only the Veil Nebula.

#9 tnakazon

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 10:30 PM

I had similar results using my Equinox 80 with a Pentax 40 XL EP and an Orion OIII filter. With a huge exit pupil (6.4mm) dimming caused by the filter is not an issue.

I imagine, as Glenn says above, that having such a scope (in this case 12.5 x 80) for each eye would produce amazing views.

I also have a 40mm Orion Highlight Plossl that I haven't tried on my ST80 - perhaps then I'll be able to get the entire North American Nebula in the FOV.

#10 tnakazon

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:33 AM

Previously I was able to see the entire view of the Veil Nebula (Eastern section + Western section + Pickering's Wisp) using my Orion Starblast 4.5 & SkyScanner Newtonian scopes with the same filter and a 26mm Highlight Plossl (giving 17X & 15X respectively), also at semi-dark orange zone sites. Just wanted to see if the ST80 could do the same using a 32mm eyepiece.

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#11 Tony Flanders

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:47 AM

Couldn't get the entire North American Nebula in the FOV with the 32mm Plossl, only the Veil Nebula.


The North America Nebula isn't very well defined. But I would say that it's somewhat smaller than the Veil.

It trails off on the north into a star cloud; that may be what's confusing you.

#12 Carol L

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 09:00 PM

Here's my 2009 observation of The Veil Nebula (with Pickering's Wedge :grin:) using a 40mm Plossl and Lumicon O-III filter - seeing some wispiness in the eastern portion was a bit of a surprise.

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#13 Carol L

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 09:02 PM

...and here's my 2009 observation of The North America Nebula using a 32mm Plossl and Lumicon O-III filter. Seeing these large nebulae in one fov sure is lovely, that's for sure - the way they were 'meant' to be seen, IMO. :)

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#14 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 07:16 AM

I'm impressed, :ooo: thanks for the views.

Rich (RLTYS)

#15 REC

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 10:10 AM

Very nice reports all. I have to keep at it with my 80mm, but tough to see in a red zone. I think I have seen parts of the Veil near the bright star.

#16 Carol L

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 12:11 PM

:rainbow: Thanks Rich, and you're welcome.
I'm still kicking myself for waiting so long to get an 80ST - what a great little scope! :grin:

#17 tnakazon

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 06:11 PM

Those are awesome drawings Carol, thanks! I'll have to try the Veil again, this time with my 40mm Plossl. Also need to see the North American again to see if I can get it in its entirety with my 32mm EP.

#18 Carol L

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 10:47 AM

Thanks! :rainbow: The 32mm should work well.
Actually, the NA Nebula fit into my 26mm Plossl but the view looked a bit cramped.

#19 dgg99

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 11:50 AM

This is a very interesting observation! I also have an 80mm short-tube –mine is a Vixen A80SS- and I love it for observing big nebulae. I live in a red zone (average NELM around 5.3), and North America nebula is not difficult with UHC and, best, O-III filter. In the best nights, its familiar shape is visible. In the veil, my view is also very similar to yours; Pickering’s wisp is visible using filters.

Here’s my sketch of the NA nebula, this time from a dark site with UHC filter.

Posted Image

Regards,

#20 tnakazon

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 06:33 PM

Thanks! :rainbow: The 32mm should work well.
Actually, the NA Nebula fit into my 26mm Plossl but the view looked a bit cramped.


Looking forward to viewing the Veil & NA again, but it probably won't be for another two weeks, as the waxing moon is ruining the views around Cygnus. The views won't be as good by then (they'll be lower in the sky).

With the 32mm, actually the Veil looked cramped - it should look better with the 40mm, similar to your view.

#21 tnakazon

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 06:39 PM

Another great sketch - thanks Diego!

#22 curiosidad

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:28 AM

Carol ,Diego , fabulous sketch, demonstrating that a simple telescope and a nebular filter can do wonders in certain objects ..
Thanks

#23 Carol L

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:00 AM

Great observational sketch, Diego - thanks for sharing it with us!
The 80mm widefield refractors certainly are wonderful for observing large nebulae. :grin:

#24 Carol L

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:13 AM

Carol ,Diego , fabulous sketch, demonstrating that a simple telescope and a nebular filter can do wonders in certain objects ..
Thanks


Thanks! :rainbow:
You're absolutely right - seeing these large nebulae in one fov is absolutely stunning. :)

#25 David Knisely

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 12:59 PM

I often use the example of putting my 2" OIII filter in the front dewcap of my 9x50 RACI finderscope to view both sides of the Veil at the same time for people who don't believe the OIII can be used in apertures under six inches. I do have an 80mm f/5 short tube and used it to see both objects, but anymore, it kind of gets left inside, as my 100mm f/6 seems to pass the threshold where detail in deep-sky objects becomes a lot easier to see, especially with filters. I prefer the views of the Veil and *especially* the North America Nebula in my 100mm f/6 refractor. In particular, the "Mexico" portion is quite a bit more prominent in the larger refractor than it is in my 80mm Short Tube. Clear skies to you.






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