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I may have been happier before Cloudy Nights

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#76 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:00 PM

Another case of "How 'Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm?" (After They've Seen Paree)? ;)

Dave Mitsky

#77 cheapersleeper

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 04:07 PM

Another case of "How 'Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm?" (After They've Seen Paree)? ;)

Dave Mitsky


Absolutely, sir.

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#78 csrlice12

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 04:24 PM

"How 'Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm?" (After They've Seen Paree)?

Easy, get'em a scope. The farm has darker skies! :lol:

#79 droid

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 06:46 AM

In the mid seventies I had a little Sears refractor and I enjoyed using it. In the mid eighties, I had a 6" f5 reflector that I put together using commercial mirrors. My pocketful of Erfles brought me great joy. Late nineties I had the ubiquitous 8" f6 dob, scraped together money to buy a few plossls and in the limited time I had to observe, was fairly satisfied.

Then came Cloudy Nights. I joined my local astro club, sold the 8" dob, got a 10" dob, started ATMing again, built a this and that and a 12" dob and now have a couple of cases of collimation tools and eyepieces. I recently wandered into the Solar system imaging forum and have poked my nose into that a little bit.

So what's the problem?

I am no longer ever satisfied with the equipment that I have now after decades of enjoying whatever equipment that I had. Reading planetary observers rave about seeing "much more detail than I could take in" and endless descriptions of "minute pinpricks on a background of black velvet," not to mention dust lanes, faint planetaries, solar flares, Airy discs and the moons of Jupiter as perfect discs.

I am now painfully aware of the limitations of my equipment and of myself as an observer. Reading the forums, it would appear that the gear is out there to do what I want. Of course, it is an order of magnitude more expensive than what I already have. Still, I seriously consider throwing money at this hobby in hopes of enjoying it more. The nagging doubt remains, though, as to whether I had more fun when my own scope, whatever it was, was the best scope in the universe.

Regards,
Brad



Brad; some times it helps to go backwards , as has already been mentioned simple scopes and simpler observing is not a bad thing, I own several telescopes, but standing by the door ,always, is my trusty 60x700 Widger scope and I get tons of viewing with this little scope.yeah I have larger scopes, but after a day in the foundry, Im often far to tired to lug ,set up etc.
Im pretty sure that little scope keeps me in the game and looking up.
Hope anything youve read in this thread helps. :)

#80 cheapersleeper

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:07 AM

In the mid seventies I had a little Sears refractor and I enjoyed using it. In the mid eighties, I had a 6" f5 reflector that I put together using commercial mirrors. My pocketful of Erfles brought me great joy. Late nineties I had the ubiquitous 8" f6 dob, scraped together money to buy a few plossls and in the limited time I had to observe, was fairly satisfied.

Then came Cloudy Nights. I joined my local astro club, sold the 8" dob, got a 10" dob, started ATMing again, built a this and that and a 12" dob and now have a couple of cases of collimation tools and eyepieces. I recently wandered into the Solar system imaging forum and have poked my nose into that a little bit.

So what's the problem?

I am no longer ever satisfied with the equipment that I have now after decades of enjoying whatever equipment that I had. Reading planetary observers rave about seeing "much more detail than I could take in" and endless descriptions of "minute pinpricks on a background of black velvet," not to mention dust lanes, faint planetaries, solar flares, Airy discs and the moons of Jupiter as perfect discs.

I am now painfully aware of the limitations of my equipment and of myself as an observer. Reading the forums, it would appear that the gear is out there to do what I want. Of course, it is an order of magnitude more expensive than what I already have. Still, I seriously consider throwing money at this hobby in hopes of enjoying it more. The nagging doubt remains, though, as to whether I had more fun when my own scope, whatever it was, was the best scope in the universe.

Regards,
Brad



Brad; some times it helps to go backwards , as has already been mentioned simple scopes and simpler observing is not a bad thing, I own several telescopes, but standing by the door ,always, is my trusty 60x700 Widger scope and I get tons of viewing with this little scope.yeah I have larger scopes, but after a day in the foundry, Im often far to tired to lug ,set up etc.
Im pretty sure that little scope keeps me in the game and looking up.
Hope anything youve read in this thread helps. :)


Andy,

I does help, and it doesn't help... Perfectionism is a hard way to live. :roflmao: Part of your advice, though, I am acting on. Still working on a 6" f5 newt for my son that I imagine I will want to use as well. That's enough aperture to see stuff and a crazy big field to make it easy and relaxing. Also, less chance of herniation.

Regards,
Brad

#81 csrlice12

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:25 AM

Had a Tasco scope in the mid 60s (wish I still had it). Didn't have another till about a year ago and did a lot of research before buying the 10" Dob. Just went by yesterday and ordered an Omni 102XLT for Christmas. I love the 10", great scope. But for backyard viewing, it was a bit of a chore to drag it out for just a couple of hours or less. I have no plans of going any bigger on either a reflector or refractor. I bought the dob because I'll be retiring in a few years and wanted to pick up a hobby; it was then that I remembered all the fun I had as a kid with that scope.....I know I'll be happy with these the rest of my life...

#82 cheapersleeper

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:58 AM

Had a Tasco scope in the mid 60s (wish I still had it). Didn't have another till about a year ago and did a lot of research before buying the 10" Dob. Just went by yesterday and ordered an Omni 102XLT for Christmas. I love the 10", great scope. But for backyard viewing, it was a bit of a chore to drag it out for just a couple of hours or less. I have no plans of going any bigger on either a reflector or refractor. I bought the dob because I'll be retiring in a few years and wanted to pick up a hobby; it was then that I remembered all the fun I had as a kid with that scope.....I know I'll be happy with these the rest of my life...


Four words: You need a twelve. :lol:

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#83 galexand

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:35 AM

I love all these simple ways to test your optics -- star test, knife edge, etc. They don't make me dissatisfied with my telescope (I paid $300, I already know it's not perfection), or I would probably regret my affiliation with you guys.

Recently I discovered that if you severely defocus a bright star (so its light covers nearly your entire field of view), you can see moving air clear as day. I can set my hand just below the front of the tube and see the warm air rising from it (YMMV if your local government hasn't invented 'winter' yet). Way cool. :)

#84 orion61

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:36 AM

I have found that after 40+ years viewing no one scope is great for everything.
My 102mm ED Meade is a great scope especially for Doubles, but my 7" Mak is better,
I have a 12" LX200 but the thing is so heavy and my Midwest skys arent that great, BUT I go running for it on those great seeing nights.
a little C6 NexStar se is a perfect grab and go scope,
so is the 127 SLT Mak. Do I miss my 17" DOB yes but my back doesn't






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