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#1 michael129

michael129

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 12:15 PM

Hi all,

If my city will lighten up the streets with 3000k led technologey it will be bad for the environment?
If yes, can someone link me to a scientific article please?

Thank you very much
Michael

#2 derangedhermit

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 11:21 PM

There's a fair amount of info at www.darksky.org. Try looking in the resources section. I think there are some pointers to recent research papers.

BTW, only things that emit "black body radiation" like incandescent lamps can usefully be described by a single number like 3000k. LEDs and most other artificial light sources don't work that way, and bad choices can result from not characterizing the light more accurately.

#3 roscoe

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 02:27 PM

Led's work at a pretty narrow light spectrum - that is why some LED Christmas lighting is blue-white and some is yellow-white (I prefer the latter, but the former is more popular in Japan....for what it's worth......)

That said, I have no clue what the various colors' impact on life forms are, but in terms of environmental factors, not only are the resources used in making the lights themselves less than standard lighting, and maintenance issues lessened by their longer life, but their carbon footprint, energy/fuel use to generate the necessary power, and indeed, cost of operation to the municipality, are all lessened by the same proportion as the difference in their electricity useage.
My own porch light is a 6W LED, which produces the same light level as a 40W incandescent, and has lasted well over a year so far (and also lights when cold, as opposed to compact fluorescents), and so operates at 1/6th of the energy usage of an incandescent. It cost about $7 on sale, by the way.
Russ






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