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True cost of astronomy?

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#76 mich_al

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 12:18 PM

The cost: less then a few counseling sessions.
....


I place the value of the profesional counseling sesions I've had in the past less than the value of the Celestron eyepiece kit I bought that I thought was very nearly useless. Charlatans!

#77 csrlice12

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 02:26 PM

Then you think a lot more highly of them then I do..... :lol:

At least you can use the Celestron Eyepiece as a focuser plug to keep out dirt...

#78 ZeroID

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:49 PM

It's not a cost, it's an investment.
An investment in yourself and your enjoyment of the hobby. Up to you if you invest wisely.

#79 CounterWeight

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 10:29 AM

is it just me, or does everyone want big better faster more?? (and darker)!



Good thought and question, I don't think it's just you - at least I'll raise my hand. :praying: I'll never have enough money or clear nights and time for this hobby - that I've resigned myself to.

Cost... absolute, relative, net. Very personal question in many ways IMO. Are you having fun and enjoying the hobby in the overall aspect of your life - vs. if you'd have spent the money elsewhere? If answer is yes then that is fantastic, 'Well done!'

Paying the freight to get here, there's no other way I'd know what I enjoy so I don't lament what it took to get this far. What has kept me on the path is that I get a lot of enjoyment from being on it.

In my way I think it's an exciting time for us amatures as far as all that is out there to have and enjoy. In the big balance sheet of life I am very thankful for that :) I'll always be able to have plans and something to look forward to. That said I try not to want anything so much I can't enjoy what I have.

#80 edwincjones

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:59 AM

Like many above,
I have spent much over the years,
maybe too much
-clearly too much on equiptment
-probably not enough on travel
about right on books/charts/magazines

but I do not regret the money
sorta like marriage or having kids
-very expensive
-the benefits are well worth it

as I get older I realize that I got a lot that I really didnot need
but it seemed reasonable at the time

If I had a do over
-less optics
-more travel
-start younger in life

edj

#81 Pauls72

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:17 PM

I don't keep track of the cost of any of my hobbies, as it would probably be depressing at what I have spent on some of them over the years. I purchase the equipment that I feel is right for me and in my price range. Most of it is good and moderately priced but none is extravagant and some is down right cheap. You don't need top of the line equipment to enjoy this hobby.

With no astronomy stores near me anymore, it's kind of hard to do any impulse buying. Yes I can buy it over the internet or phone, but it will be at least 3-5 days before I get it in my grubby little hands, so it really takes away the impulse buying urge. Now days it seems like most manufactures announce their new product at least 6-12 months before it's available, so there is no impulse buying there either.


Anyone know how to mount a scope on a Bass boat???? :question:

Mounting the scope to the boat is the easy part. It's building the concrete pier in the lake to mount your boat on for stability that's the problem. :tonofbricks:

#82 SL63 AMG

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 02:02 PM

THE BEST investment one can make in this hobby is purchasing a home in a dark sky location.

I know from experience. I spent tens of thousands on equipment and none of it helped me see or photograph a single object in the sky at my previous light polluted home.

Since moving to Arizona, in a location with little to no light pollution, average MPSAS SQM reading of 21.5 and weather conditions that allow me to view the sky 300+ days per year, I have never been happier.

If I sold all of my expensive gear and was left with just a small DOB, refractor, binoculars or even my eyes, I still would be happier.

When I lived back east I never just walked outside, looked up and exclaimed "WOW".

I do that every time I step outside at night here in Arizona.

My move to a dark sky location is priceless and I wouldn't trade it for the most expensive telescope in the world located in a light polluted area.

#83 stevenf

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 02:18 PM

I think you make a very good point here Dave. I can only speak for myself, but I know that part of my gear buying addiction (or pathetic weakness as some here would call it) is due to the fact that I live in a location where it's constantly raining, and I'm in the middle of a white zone for light pollution. Collecting and acquiring gear, fiddling with it, trading and selling it...it's a way to get some enjoyment out of the hobby and still feel connected to it, even though I can't actually use it all that often for it's intended purpose.

#84 starrancher

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 02:20 PM

THE BEST investment one can make in this hobby is purchasing a home in a dark sky location.

I know from experience. I spent tens of thousands on equipment and none of it helped me see or photograph a single object in the sky at my previous light polluted home.

Since moving to Arizona, in a location with little to no light pollution, average MPSAS SQM reading of 21.5 and weather conditions that allow me to view the sky 300+ days per year, I have never been happier.

If I sold all of my expensive gear and was left with just a small DOB, refractor, binoculars or even my eyes, I still would be happier.

When I lived back east I never just walked outside, looked up and exclaimed "WOW".

I do that every time I step outside at night here in Arizona.

My move to a dark sky location is priceless and I wouldn't trade it for the most expensive telescope in the world located in a light polluted area.


You got that right !
:bow:

#85 csrlice12

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:17 PM

Know what you mean. I now live in the Denver Tech Center (think skyscrapers across the street); used to have 5 acres outside of Edgewood, New Mexico. Only lights around were mine. Didn't own a scope then, wasn't a happy time in my life; but I did spend a lot of time just looking at the stars there with the naked eye. The milky way was just that. Sure do wish I had those skies now....

#86 Doc Willie

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:31 PM

Trying to put this in some kind of perspective: Adding it all up, with the most generous assumptions, I still have not spent what one year of college tuition for one of my kids cost.

#87 EddWen

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 12:23 PM

Roger that!

I will add that a ROR Observatory is a nice addition.


THE BEST investment one can make in this hobby is purchasing a home in a dark sky location.

I know from experience. I spent tens of thousands on equipment and none of it helped me see or photograph a single object in the sky at my previous light polluted home.

Since moving to Arizona, in a location with little to no light pollution, average MPSAS SQM reading of 21.5 and weather conditions that allow me to view the sky 300+ days per year, I have never been happier.

If I sold all of my expensive gear and was left with just a small DOB, refractor, binoculars or even my eyes, I still would be happier.

When I lived back east I never just walked outside, looked up and exclaimed "WOW".

I do that every time I step outside at night here in Arizona.

My move to a dark sky location is priceless and I wouldn't trade it for the most expensive telescope in the world located in a light polluted area.

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#88 Shneor

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 12:50 PM

I don't agree that you need to live under dark skies - you just need to be within driving distance.
Clears,
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#89 Bill Weir

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 10:04 PM

I don't agree that you need to live under dark skies - you just need to be within driving distance.
Clears,
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Besides if everyone did then I suggest those places would be quite a bit less dark.

I stopped keeping track of how much I've spent. It's irrelevant. I wonder what is the cost to my inner self if I don't take part in this hobby that really fills a hole/desire?

As long as I'm not spending more than I can afford then it doesn't matter. If you are then that's different. You can't take any of this "stuff" with you when you go. As a nurse I've been a part of and seen many deaths. At none of them was the person packing anything visible. It's only money/stuff. Live life with no regrets as it's all too short. On the other hand it's far too long to carry the big burdon of regrets.

Oh and the expensive scope in my signature, it was my wife's idea. She's the best.

Bill

#90 Bob Griffiths

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:51 AM

I sure have NOT read many of the replies...

But I've been in this hobby since the Mid 1950's when I got hooked as a Cub (not boy) Scout..
Astronomy is BY FAR the least expensive hobby that I have..

I'm a serious woodworker and I play around with older Corvettes ...the cars (6 if them) do not even have to leave the garages and they cost me a few thousand dollars a year.. The wood shop does not function without lumber ...

I have not spend a single Penny this year on anything (except a magazine subscription and a few Apps for my table and phone on my Astronomy hobby..

Just my thoughts ...

Bob G






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